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Peter Guber

BUSINESS
April 15, 1990 | MICHAEL CIEPLY and ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Sony Corp. hasn't quit making waves since it bought Columbia Pictures Entertainment from Coca-Cola Co. and other shareholders for $3.4 billion last fall. First came a nasty scrap with Time Warner Inc. over the services of Columbia's prospective co-chairmen, "Batman" producers Peter Guber and Jon Peters, who happened to be under contract to the American media giant.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1990
Re Nina Easton's Dec. 31 article "Behind the Scenes of the Big Deal," about Sony's purchase of Columbia Pictures: Sony and the Japanese have created nothing original. All of the famous Japanese products, from the radio to the television set to the videocassette recorder, were invented elsewhere. Namely, here in the United States. All the Japanese have done is to take already existing products and make them cheaper. In the case of the Columbia deal, Jon Peters, Peter Guber and the Japanese are taking an already existing product; only, in this case, it does not seem that the Japanese are making anything cheaper or better!
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1989 | NINA J. EASTON
When Sony bought Columbia Pictures, the shock wave rolled across America--the Japanese had finally made the move into Hollywood. And the bitter legal fight with Warner for producers Guber and Peters sent aftershocks through the film industry for months. A look behind the scenes of this epic deal provides insight into how Sony will do business in Hollywood and what's in store for the '90s.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1989 | NINA J. EASTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After two months of haggling with Warner Bros. over their exclusive production contract with that studio, producers Peter Guber and Jon Peters are finally free to take over Sony's newly purchased Columbia Pictures. And they're hitting the ground running. Already they've talked about the corporate jets they will order. Plans are in the works to build a gym and day-care center and to spruce up the executive offices at Columbia Pictures' new home at the former MGM lot in Culver City.
NEWS
November 17, 1989 | NINA J. EASTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sony Corp. has agreed to hand over assets worth several hundred million dollars to Warner Bros. so that it can hire two prominent Hollywood producers to run its newly acquired Columbia Pictures Entertainment studio.
BUSINESS
November 8, 1989 | From Associated Press
Sony Corp. said Tuesday that it has completed its $3.4-billion buyout of Columbia Pictures Entertainment Inc., the film and television production giant. The Japanese electronics and records company said that its $200-million tender offer for Guber-Peters Entertainment Co., a Hollywood production concern, had also expired and that about 99.5% of Guber-Peters' shares were either tendered or promised by the deadline.
BUSINESS
November 1, 1989 | NINA J. EASTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After more than a week of filing bitter accusations against each other in court, Warner Bros. and Sony Corp. reached a tentative settlement Tuesday that would release producers Peter Guber and Jon Peters from their Warner contract--leaving them free to manage Columbia Pictures Entertainment for its new parent company, Sony.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1989 | PAT H. BROESKE
Until a few days ago, "Tango and Cash" was a forgotten element in the legal battle between Sony and Warner Bros. over the rights to Hollywood's hottest production company,Guber-Peters Entertainment. Now, by declaring in court papers that they were taken off the movie by Warner two days before Sony asked them to run Columbia Pictures, producers Peter Guber and Jon Peters have pushed "Tango and Cash" into the foreground.
BUSINESS
October 31, 1989
I was disappointed to read your editorial. As a graduate of South Pasadena High School and a resident of Alhambra, I have friends on both sides of the issue. Beyond the destruction and disruption of a small town that this construction would bring, there is one concern that stands out. That is the problem of the proximity of this proposed link to South Pasadena High. If I were emperor of the universe, it would be a capital crime to even consider placing a freeway near a school.
BUSINESS
October 27, 1989 | KATHRYN HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The "Hollywood embrace" gained new meaning Thursday with the filing of court documents describing in detail the dispute between Warner Bros. and Sony Corp. for the executive talents of Peter Guber and Jon Peters, producers of this summer's smash hit, "Batman." According to pleadings filed by Guber and Peters' lawyers, Warner production president Terry Semel "hugged and congratulated" Peter Guber upon learning on Sept.
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