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Peter Hoffman

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BUSINESS
March 19, 1998 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Producer Peter Hoffman's criminal tax fraud case ended with a whimper Wednesday when the executive pleaded guilty to the misdemeanor federal charge of sending a false tax return to the Internal Revenue Service that understated his 1989 taxable income by about $33,000. The plea, which includes no promise to cooperate with other federal tax investigations, ends a case in which Hoffman had originally faced four felony tax fraud charges.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2006 | Robert W. Welkos, Times Staff Writer
Peter Hoffman sits on the 130-foot, canoe-bottomed motor yacht South Paw, moored near the Palais de Festivals. A strong breeze ruffles his hair and in the distance thousands of people crowd the Croisette as the Hollywood executive ponders the Cannes Film Festival. "I think the festival is less important," Hoffman said. "There was a time when winning the Palme d'Or, best director, were important.
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BUSINESS
June 1, 2001 | Bloomberg News
Artisan Entertainment Inc., the movie company that released the "Blair Witch" films, has sued financier and producer Peter Hoffman for allegedly causing the company to scrap plans for a first-time stock sale. Artisan claims that a film-financing project backed by insurance policies that Hoffman proposed fell apart, forcing the company to halt production on films and delay its initial public offering.
BUSINESS
June 1, 2001 | Bloomberg News
Artisan Entertainment Inc., the movie company that released the "Blair Witch" films, has sued financier and producer Peter Hoffman for allegedly causing the company to scrap plans for a first-time stock sale. Artisan claims that a film-financing project backed by insurance policies that Hoffman proposed fell apart, forcing the company to halt production on films and delay its initial public offering.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
A real-life fight has erupted over Sylvester Stallone's "Rambo III," which ended shooting in Israel on Nov. 30 and then moved to locations in Thailand. Carolco Pictures Inc. and Tel Aviv-based Golan & Globus Studios are blaming each other for a rash of bounced checks. Golan & Globus' managing director Itzak Kol, besieged by nearly 100 irate creditors (including police and crew members), claims that Carolco location officials signed $200,000 in bad checks.
BUSINESS
October 1, 1997 | James Bates
A federal jury in Los Angeles is scheduled to start deliberations today on whether former Carolco Pictures Chief Executive Peter Hoffman misrepresented his income and signed false returns to avoid taxes. Government prosecutors allege that Hoffman improperly tapped into more than $1 million in deferred compensation accumulated at Carolco, while his lawyers contend that the payments were loans he paid back.
BUSINESS
December 31, 1991 | JOHN LIPPMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carolco Pictures said Monday that its chief executive, Peter Hoffman, will step down after his contract expires in March, ending months of speculation that the top strategist behind the independent studio's rapid diversification was on the way out.
BUSINESS
May 11, 1992 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Peter M. Hoffman, the former president and chief executive of Carolco Pictures Corp., has formed an entertainment company called CineVisions. The company will seek out business opportunities in emerging entertainment markets such as India, Indonesia and Eastern Europe. As chairman of CineVisions, Hoffman also will work as a financial consultant to the industry. He said he may even independently produce low-budget movies. CineVisions' backers include Canyons Partners Inc.
BUSINESS
May 31, 1987 | AL DELUGACH, Times Staff Writer
In "First Blood" released in 1982 and "Rambo: First Blood Part II" released in 1985, Sylvester Stallone's machine gun-toting, all-American avenger waved the flag and defeated evil while grossing an awesome $390 million at the box office. Along the way, Rambo became for some people an icon of renewed American patriotism. Meantime, the films' producers had the ironic good fortune of avoiding U.S.
BUSINESS
May 18, 1993 | ALAN CITRON
In show business, long before Hans and Franz arrived by way of "Saturday Night Live," there was simply Frans--a bald Dutch banker who helped launch the independent film industry in the high-rolling 1980s. Frans J. Afman oversaw hundreds of millions of dollars in loans to companies--many of which later went under--as the entertainment czar for French bank Credit Lyonnais. Known as "the banker who reads Variety," Afman also became a colorful fixture at the annual film festival here.
BUSINESS
March 19, 1998 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Producer Peter Hoffman's criminal tax fraud case ended with a whimper Wednesday when the executive pleaded guilty to the misdemeanor federal charge of sending a false tax return to the Internal Revenue Service that understated his 1989 taxable income by about $33,000. The plea, which includes no promise to cooperate with other federal tax investigations, ends a case in which Hoffman had originally faced four felony tax fraud charges.
BUSINESS
October 1, 1997 | James Bates
A federal jury in Los Angeles is scheduled to start deliberations today on whether former Carolco Pictures Chief Executive Peter Hoffman misrepresented his income and signed false returns to avoid taxes. Government prosecutors allege that Hoffman improperly tapped into more than $1 million in deferred compensation accumulated at Carolco, while his lawyers contend that the payments were loans he paid back.
BUSINESS
May 18, 1993 | ALAN CITRON
In show business, long before Hans and Franz arrived by way of "Saturday Night Live," there was simply Frans--a bald Dutch banker who helped launch the independent film industry in the high-rolling 1980s. Frans J. Afman oversaw hundreds of millions of dollars in loans to companies--many of which later went under--as the entertainment czar for French bank Credit Lyonnais. Known as "the banker who reads Variety," Afman also became a colorful fixture at the annual film festival here.
BUSINESS
May 11, 1992 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Peter M. Hoffman, the former president and chief executive of Carolco Pictures Corp., has formed an entertainment company called CineVisions. The company will seek out business opportunities in emerging entertainment markets such as India, Indonesia and Eastern Europe. As chairman of CineVisions, Hoffman also will work as a financial consultant to the industry. He said he may even independently produce low-budget movies. CineVisions' backers include Canyons Partners Inc.
BUSINESS
December 31, 1991 | JOHN LIPPMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carolco Pictures said Monday that its chief executive, Peter Hoffman, will step down after his contract expires in March, ending months of speculation that the top strategist behind the independent studio's rapid diversification was on the way out.
BUSINESS
December 7, 1991 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the end of "Terminator 2," Arnold Schwarzenegger's cyborg character discovers that blinding brute force doesn't always ensure survival. Carolco Pictures Inc., the freewheeling production company that made the movie, recently has learned the same lesson. Carolco has been forced into deep cuts in its operations, despite its success with "Terminator 2" and other audaciously ambitious action movies.
BUSINESS
December 7, 1991 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the end of "Terminator 2," Arnold Schwarzenegger's cyborg character discovers that blinding brute force doesn't always ensure survival. Carolco Pictures Inc., the freewheeling production company that made the movie, recently has learned the same lesson. Carolco has been forced into deep cuts in its operations, despite its success with "Terminator 2" and other audaciously ambitious action movies.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2006 | Robert W. Welkos, Times Staff Writer
Peter Hoffman sits on the 130-foot, canoe-bottomed motor yacht South Paw, moored near the Palais de Festivals. A strong breeze ruffles his hair and in the distance thousands of people crowd the Croisette as the Hollywood executive ponders the Cannes Film Festival. "I think the festival is less important," Hoffman said. "There was a time when winning the Palme d'Or, best director, were important.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
A real-life fight has erupted over Sylvester Stallone's "Rambo III," which ended shooting in Israel on Nov. 30 and then moved to locations in Thailand. Carolco Pictures Inc. and Tel Aviv-based Golan & Globus Studios are blaming each other for a rash of bounced checks. Golan & Globus' managing director Itzak Kol, besieged by nearly 100 irate creditors (including police and crew members), claims that Carolco location officials signed $200,000 in bad checks.
BUSINESS
May 31, 1987 | AL DELUGACH, Times Staff Writer
In "First Blood" released in 1982 and "Rambo: First Blood Part II" released in 1985, Sylvester Stallone's machine gun-toting, all-American avenger waved the flag and defeated evil while grossing an awesome $390 million at the box office. Along the way, Rambo became for some people an icon of renewed American patriotism. Meantime, the films' producers had the ironic good fortune of avoiding U.S.
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