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Peter Kerndt

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1998
The county's top epidemiologist, Dr. Peter Kerndt, resumed work Wednesday, one month after being placed on administrative leave for his role in a controversial AIDS vaccine preparedness study. County Health Services Director Mark Finucane said the administrative inquiry into Kerndt's leadership role in the study is continuing, however, and that his return to work does not mean the department has cleared him of allegations of wrongdoing.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1998
The county's top epidemiologist, Dr. Peter Kerndt, resumed work Wednesday, one month after being placed on administrative leave for his role in a controversial AIDS vaccine preparedness study. County Health Services Director Mark Finucane said the administrative inquiry into Kerndt's leadership role in the study is continuing, however, and that his return to work does not mean the department has cleared him of allegations of wrongdoing.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1998 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Less than a week after his client was placed on 30 days' administrative leave, a lawyer for Los Angeles County's chief epidemiologist demanded Wednesday that Dr. Peter Kerndt be immediately reinstated, and flatly denied that the physician failed to inform his superiors of his participation in a federal study designed to pave the way for testing potential AIDS vaccines. In a letter sent to county Health Services Director Mark Finucane, lawyer James P.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1998 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Less than a week after his client was placed on 30 days' administrative leave, a lawyer for Los Angeles County's chief epidemiologist demanded Wednesday that Dr. Peter Kerndt be immediately reinstated, and flatly denied that the physician failed to inform his superiors of his participation in a federal study designed to pave the way for testing potential AIDS vaccines. In a letter sent to county Health Services Director Mark Finucane, lawyer James P.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1998 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a confidential report to be finalized today, investigators for the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services allege that the county's top epidemiologist failed to obtain the permission of--or even notify--his superiors before committing public resources to a federal research project designed to lay the groundwork for testing future AIDS vaccines. The investigators also say that Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1998 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The county's chief epidemiologist Friday was placed on 30 days administrative leave after investigators alleged that he improperly committed the health department's resources to a federally funded study designed to lay the groundwork for the testing of AIDS vaccines. The study and its director, Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1998
The pettiness of elected officials becomes increasingly galling ("People Could Die, but Let's Not Make Waves," Commentary, Feb. 20). A dedicated, compassionate, ethical scientist, Dr. Peter Kerndt, Los Angeles County's chief epidemiologist, is sidelined because someone issued "misinformation." The public be damned; we lose competent, educated, hard-working, credible people due to rumor-mongering. I hope my supervisor was not one of those impugning the impeccable career of such a worthy doctor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1997
Despite a downward turn in local AIDS deaths, more minority Los Angeles residents are living with HIV than ever before, according to testimony Wednesday at forum on AIDS and HIV. The "Los Angeles AIDS Summit: People of Color and HIV" was held at Los Angles Unified School District headquarters and addressed such topics as "Are HIV Infections Dropping in Communities of Color?" and "How Do We Ensure That People of Color Are Accessing Medical Treatments?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1998
Regarding your Jan. 31 story about how Dr. Peter Kerndt, chief epidemiologist for L.A. County, was placed on administrative leave due to his efforts to study possible AIDS vaccines in African Americans: I am at a loss to understand how the Health Services Department concluded that Kerndt had "misled community representatives, elected officials, department management and the federal government," when The Times reported memos informing his superiors about...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 2005 | Rong-Gong Lin II, Times Staff Writer
The L.A. Gay and Lesbian Center said Thursday that it has abandoned the use of a rapid oral HIV test introduced last year, saying that it produces too many false positive results. The announcement came a month after a major testing center in San Francisco, the UCSF AIDS Health Project, made the same decision. The Los Angeles center found 13 people in November who tested positive for HIV from the oral swab test, but follow-up tests showed that they were not infected.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1998 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The county's chief epidemiologist Friday was placed on 30 days administrative leave after investigators alleged that he improperly committed the health department's resources to a federally funded study designed to lay the groundwork for the testing of AIDS vaccines. The study and its director, Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1998 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a confidential report to be finalized today, investigators for the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services allege that the county's top epidemiologist failed to obtain the permission of--or even notify--his superiors before committing public resources to a federal research project designed to lay the groundwork for testing future AIDS vaccines. The investigators also say that Dr.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1989
In response to your editorial "AIDS: Cool Reception" Feb. 20: It's unfortunate that the Center for Disease Control and Dr. Peter Kerndt, epidemiologist in the Los Angeles County AIDS program office, interpreted the fact that fewer than 100 representatives from minority agencies working in AIDS-prevention programs showed up at the Biltmore Hotel for the briefing the CDC offered recently, as having received a "cool reception."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2004 | Lisa Richardson, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles Gay & Lesbian Center alerted county health officials Friday that it has administered the wrong type of penicillin to about 300 people seeking treatment for syphilis over the past five years. Penicillin therapy is the mainstay of treatment for syphilis, according to county health officials, but different formulas exist. Clients at the Gay & Lesbian Center were treated with Bicillin C-R instead of Bicillin L-A, the trade name for benzathine penicillin G.
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