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ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1990 | RICHARD S. GINELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Southwest Chamber Music Society apparently doesn't want to know about the word routine. That was the impression left by its refreshingly eclectic program Thursday night in Chapman College's Salmon Recital Hall (and repeated Friday at the Pasadena Library). Unusual instrumental combinations dominated this outing, beginning with Max Reger's delightful Serenade for flute, violin and viola, Opus 141a, a dashing, rambunctious, richly harmonized piece that ought to be better known.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 2013 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
Leonard Marsh, a window washer from Brooklyn who struck it rich after he and two of his boyhood pals created a soft drink called Snapple, has died. He was 80. Marsh, Snapple's former chief executive, died Tuesday at his home in Manhasset, N.Y., his family announced. The cause was not disclosed. He and his partners - brother-in-law Hyman Golden and longtime friend Arnold Greenberg - grew up in Brooklyn's Brownsville neighborhood without much beyond their ambitions. PHOTOS: Notable deaths of 2013 Born Jan. 5, 1933, Marsh was the son of Jewish immigrants from Russia.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1992 | TIMOTHY MANGAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Enthusiasm can make up for much in a faulty musical performance, but it cannot make those faults disappear. Thursday night's season-opening program of the Southwest Chamber Music Society was delivered, as is usual for this ensemble, with obvious and visceral enthusiasm. There seems never a dull moment with this always-adventuresome group, now in its sixth season. But in this concert at Chapman University in Orange, the rough edges were more apparent, and irksome, than usual.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 1990 | SUSAN BLISS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In 1976, Luigi Nono wrote a funereal work prompted by a series of deaths that had swept his family and that of his friend, pianist Maurizio Pollini. Thursday night, at Salmon Recital Hall on the campus of Chapman College, the Southwest Chamber Music Society offered " . . . sofferte onde serene . . . " as a tribute to its composer, who died last May.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1991 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gyorgy Ligeti's Trio ("Hommage a Brahms") for horn, violin and piano served as the emotionally wrenching core of a program that opened the Southwest Chamber Music Society's fifth season Thursday at Bertea Hall at Chapman University. Even without the helpful introductory comments by Jeff von der Schmidt, horn player and artistic director of the society, the impact of this work, composed in 1982, surely would have been felt.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1988 | DANIEL CARIAGA
A number of nervous moments marked the first half of the final concert at the Corona del Mar Baroque Festival. By intermission, the worst was over, and the second half went smoothly. More than smoothly, splendidly.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1988 | BRUCE BURROUGHS
You've heard the one about the silk purse and the sow's ear. Sunday afternoon, Ami Porat and the strings of the Mozart Camerata neatly transformed the decidedly non-glamorous auditorium at Santa Ana High School from the latter into the former. These accomplished musicians vanquished negative effects of unlikely surroundings and attendant acoustical anomalies via the most straightforward means: glowing, stylistically elegant, splendidly accurate playing from first note to last.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1987 | HERBERT GLASS
The Sequoia String Quartet & Friends series at the Japan America Theatre has, in the half-dozen years of its existence, become a vital, sometimes unpredictable (part of its appeal) ingredient of Los Angeles musical life, playing to a dedicated, perceptive audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 1987 | JOHN HENKEN
Composer/conductor Gerhard Samuel's activities have been based in Cincinnati for the last 11 years. Visits to Los Angeles, however, have kept his presence fresh among the friends and followers he earned during his tenures here. That was readily apparent as Samuel led the latest Monday Evening Concert. The audience in Bing Theater at the County Museum of Art seemed larger than usual, and the persistent applause of a vociferous few gave the performers more curtain calls than usual.
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