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NEWS
July 1, 2011 | By Katherine Skiba, Chicago Tribune
Democrat Tammy Duckworth, who Thursday left a high-level job at the Veterans Affairs Department, has begun making calls to sound people out about a potential run for Congress in Illinois, political consultant Pete Giangreco said Friday. Duckworth, who was an assistant VA secretary, lost both her legs in Iraq after the Black Hawk helicopter she was piloting was hit by enemy fire. After she recuperated from her injuries, she ran for Congress in 2006 and lost to Peter Roskam, a Republican now in his third term.
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NEWS
July 1, 2011 | By Katherine Skiba, Chicago Tribune
Democrat Tammy Duckworth, who Thursday left a high-level job at the Veterans Affairs Department, has begun making calls to sound people out about a potential run for Congress in Illinois, political consultant Pete Giangreco said Friday. Duckworth, who was an assistant VA secretary, lost both her legs in Iraq after the Black Hawk helicopter she was piloting was hit by enemy fire. After she recuperated from her injuries, she ran for Congress in 2006 and lost to Peter Roskam, a Republican now in his third term.
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NATIONAL
October 22, 2006 | P.J. Huffstutter, Times Staff Writer
In the crucial last weeks before election day, when every campaign dollar counts, Republicans' struggles with scandal and other woes have dominated the news -- but in the highly competitive and closely watched race for the seat of retiring Rep. Henry J. Hyde (R-Ill.), it's a Democrat who is doing the struggling. As of the end of September, retired Army Maj. L. Tammy Duckworth had spent all but $206,000 of the nearly $2.
NATIONAL
October 22, 2006 | P.J. Huffstutter, Times Staff Writer
In the crucial last weeks before election day, when every campaign dollar counts, Republicans' struggles with scandal and other woes have dominated the news -- but in the highly competitive and closely watched race for the seat of retiring Rep. Henry J. Hyde (R-Ill.), it's a Democrat who is doing the struggling. As of the end of September, retired Army Maj. L. Tammy Duckworth had spent all but $206,000 of the nearly $2.
NATIONAL
March 23, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Tammy Duckworth, a former Army helicopter pilot who lost both legs in a grenade attack in Iraq, is now leading the charge for the Democrats. Duckworth on Tuesday narrowly won the Democratic nomination for Congress in a primary race for the House seat held by Republican Rep. Henry J. Hyde, who is retiring after 32 years. In November, Duckworth will face state Sen. Peter Roskam, a well-to-do lawyer and conservative from Wheaton who ran unopposed in the GOP primary.
NEWS
September 29, 2011 | By James Oliphant
Gunfire on Capitol Hill. Children taken hostage. John Boehner making ransom demands. President Obama pleading on a bullhorn. Sound ridiculous? Well, that's the Onion's stock in trade. This is a site that currently features a story titled "Syracuse Leaves Big East for a Woman Named Misti. " The satirical news site posted an item about a purported standoff at the U.S. Capitol in which desperate members of Congress took a group of kids hostage in order to pay off the national debt.
NATIONAL
November 8, 2006 | Johanna Neuman, Times Staff Writer
Eager to topple Republicans from power, Democratic strategists recruited military veterans fresh from combat in Iraq to run for Congress. Their gambit: to validate Democratic opposition to the war -- without risking GOP charges of disloyalty -- by putting forward the brave men and women who were fighting it. Almost a dozen veterans and military officials signed up to carry the fight to the home front.
NEWS
March 4, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON -- President Obama unveiled a budget proposal Tuesday that increases spending on early childhood education, job training, high-tech manufacturing and urban redevelopment in an effort to shrink the gap between rich and poor. “Our budget is about choices. It's about our values,” Obama said Tuesday as he promoted his spending plan at a local elementary school. “We've got to decide if we're going to keep squeezing the middle class or reduce our deficits responsibly.” The annual budget plan includes an additional $56 billion for what the White House dubs the “Opportunity, Growth the Security Initiative.” The list is a grab bag of Democratic priorities currently stalled in a divided Congress.
NATIONAL
November 22, 2006 | Crystal Yednak, Chicago Tribune
Facing criticism over his record on veterans issues, Gov. Rod Blagojevich turned Tuesday to former congressional candidate and Iraq war veteran Tammy Duckworth to run Illinois' Veterans' Affairs Department. Duckworth was looking for work and contemplating returning to college for a graduate degree after losing to Republican Peter Roskam Nov. 7 in a close race in the 6th Congressional District.
NATIONAL
February 13, 2009 | Christi Parsons
President Obama preached a message of hope about the economy here Thursday, praising employees gathered in a Caterpillar plant for soldiering through tough times, and he promised that help is on the way. But the audience was dotted with dispirited workers who had just gotten word of 20,000 layoffs coming at the heavy-equipment giant, and though community leaders and managers cheered Obama's words, others in the crowd were in no mood to join in.
NATIONAL
March 4, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey and Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - Looking beyond the deficit battles and financial crises of years past, President Obama put forward a $3.9-trillion budget proposal Tuesday that set out a wish list of programs on education, infrastructure, job training and urban revitalization, adding policy details to his rhetorical promises to bridge the gap between rich and poor. Like any president's annual budget blueprint, Obama's stands no chance of being adopted as is by Congress. This year, the prospects are especially dim since Congress recently approved a two-year spending deal after years of ugly budget fights, and there is little interest in reopening the debate.
NATIONAL
October 13, 2006 | James Gerstenzang, Times Staff Writer
Under ordinary circumstances, there would have been nothing remarkable about President Bush's praise Thursday for House Speaker J. Dennis Hastert at a political fundraiser. But this is not an ordinary year. Hastert is struggling to cope with the fallout from how his office handled reports that former Florida Republican Rep. Mark Foley dispatched inappropriate electronic messages to a former congressional page.
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