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Peter S Kalikow

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BUSINESS
August 21, 1991 | From Reuters
Peter S. Kalikow, the real estate developer who owns the New York Post newspaper, filed for personal bankruptcy protection Tuesday. Kalikow, who blamed the recession and New York City's hard-hit real estate market, said, "I want to make it extremely clear that this filing will not affect the operation of the New York Post, which has operated profitably since last October." The flashy tabloid was founded by Alexander Hamilton in 1801. Kalikow said the filing, under Chapter 11 of the U.S.
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BUSINESS
February 20, 1993 | From Newsday
The New York Post's future remained in limbo Friday even though a federal bankruptcy judge approved its sale to acting Publisher Steven Hoffenberg. Judge Burton Lifland said there was "no viable alternative" to Hoffenberg's offer, which involves no cash but the assumption of the Post's debts, which total at least $25 million. Lifland is overseeing the personal bankruptcy of Post owner Peter Kalikow. But Friday's hearing made it clear that Hoffenberg may not be financially viable either.
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BUSINESS
March 25, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Kalikow Hires Adviser for N.Y. Daily News: Peter S. Kalikow, publisher of the New York Post, said he has hired Lazard Freres & Co. to consider offers to buy the New York Daily News in a joint effort with another bidder. Kalikow, a real estate developer, has said he wants to buy the newspaper and combine its operations with his tabloid newspaper. He said Lazard Freres will advise him on the financing of the acquisition of the Daily News as well as analyze what Kalikow said are "offers . . .
BUSINESS
July 27, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
N.Y. Post Publisher May Bid on Daily News: Developer and Publisher Peter Kalikow is near a deal with Wall Street investor Leon Black that would pull Kalikow out of bankruptcy and give him financing to bid for New York's Daily News, according to a weekly business newspaper. Black, former head of mergers and acquisitions at Drexel Burnham Lambert Inc., will provide $50 million to Kalikow, Crain's New York Business reported.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1988 | United Press International
Real estate magnate Peter S. Kalikow, called one of the nation's richest men and one of the city's worst landlords, waltzed into the world of publishing with his tentative agreement Sunday to buy the financially troubled New York Post. Kalikow's lack of experience in publishing and his reputation as one of the city's most vigorous developers fueled suspicions that he was more interested in the Post's waterfront site than in running the city's oldest continuously published daily.
BUSINESS
May 26, 1989 | From Associated Press
Jane Amsterdam, editor of the New York Post for 11 months, has quit her $200,000-a-year job after cutbacks in the floundering Sunday section, two of the newspaper's competitors reported today. A spokesman for the Post, Howard Rubenstein, would neither confirm nor deny the reports and he said Post owner Peter S. Kalikow would have no comment. Amsterdam's secretary at the Post said Amsterdam was not in the office today and was not expected. The secretary said all calls on the subject were being forwarded to Rubenstein.
BUSINESS
May 27, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Jane Amsterdam, editor of the ailing New York Post for less than a year, was reported Friday to have quit her $200,000-a-year job, but a spokesman for the tabloid said "she has neither resigned nor been fired." Amsterdam's office was empty Friday and efforts to reach her were unsuccessful. The Post, sold last year by media magnate Rupert Murdoch to real estate developer Peter S. Kalikow, has lost millions of dollars over the last decade and is currently believed to be suffering heavy losses from a recently introduced Sunday edition.
BUSINESS
February 8, 1988 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, Times Staff Writer
Rupert Murdoch agreed Sunday to sell the New York Post to real estate developer Peter S. Kalikow for a reported $37 million, but the deal is conditioned on Murdoch winning "sweeping" concessions from the newspaper's unions. Murdoch, the native Australian who has lost dozens of millions on the Post since 1976, expects to begin meeting with union leaders today to seek "significant reductions in labor costs" that Kalikow finds satisfactory. Kalikow reportedly wants concessions worth $20 million.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1988 | Associated Press
Rupert Murdoch told union leaders Monday that his effort to sell the New York Post will fail, and the newspaper will close by the end of next week unless employees agree to a 12% pay cut and other concessions totaling $24 million over three years. "At this point, whether or not the Post survives is entirely up to the cooperation from our unions," Murdoch said in a statement issued after he met briefly with union leaders. "If Feb.
BUSINESS
December 18, 1991 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like a pair of bloodied prizefighters, the New York Daily News and the New York Post traded charges about each other's financial health Tuesday in the latest volley in a long-running tabloid war that one or both will likely lose. The News, in an article headlined "POST IS CRYING FOR CASH," reported that its rival's publisher, Peter S. Kalikow, "is scrambling for $5 million to help the tabloid pay its bills."
BUSINESS
March 25, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Kalikow Hires Adviser for N.Y. Daily News: Peter S. Kalikow, publisher of the New York Post, said he has hired Lazard Freres & Co. to consider offers to buy the New York Daily News in a joint effort with another bidder. Kalikow, a real estate developer, has said he wants to buy the newspaper and combine its operations with his tabloid newspaper. He said Lazard Freres will advise him on the financing of the acquisition of the Daily News as well as analyze what Kalikow said are "offers . . .
BUSINESS
February 14, 1992 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New York Post Publisher Peter S. Kalikow said Thursday that he'd like to acquire the New York Daily News, but his expression of interest drew a barbed response from the troubled tabloid. Kalikow, a real estate magnate who plunged into personal bankruptcy proceedings last summer, said the terms and conditions of his offer will be disclosed after he reviewed confidential financial information being circulated to possible buyers of the News.
BUSINESS
December 18, 1991 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like a pair of bloodied prizefighters, the New York Daily News and the New York Post traded charges about each other's financial health Tuesday in the latest volley in a long-running tabloid war that one or both will likely lose. The News, in an article headlined "POST IS CRYING FOR CASH," reported that its rival's publisher, Peter S. Kalikow, "is scrambling for $5 million to help the tabloid pay its bills."
BUSINESS
August 21, 1991 | From Reuters
Peter S. Kalikow, the real estate developer who owns the New York Post newspaper, filed for personal bankruptcy protection Tuesday. Kalikow, who blamed the recession and New York City's hard-hit real estate market, said, "I want to make it extremely clear that this filing will not affect the operation of the New York Post, which has operated profitably since last October." The flashy tabloid was founded by Alexander Hamilton in 1801. Kalikow said the filing, under Chapter 11 of the U.S.
BUSINESS
June 21, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Kalikow Debt Plan: Peter Kalikow said he is working on a plan to restructure his debts and maintain control of his vast empire. Kalikow is one of New York's biggest developers and publisher of the New York Post. In his proposal, some of his assets would be put into a pool that would serve as collateral for about $1.1 billion he owes to more than a dozen banks and other institutions. Some of the nation's biggest banks, including Citicorp, Chase Manhattan Corp. and Manufacturers Hanover Corp.
BUSINESS
September 18, 1990 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The long-ailing New York Post survived another threatened shutdown Monday as the last of its nine unions voted for contract concessions that management said were needed to keep the boisterous tabloid alive. In a tumultuous meeting, members of the Post's Newspaper Guild voted 242 to 45 to accept a proposal that will cut the guild's workers to a four-day work week and eliminate 43 jobs. The paper's eight other unions accepted concession packages in negotiations last Friday.
BUSINESS
September 15, 1990 | PAUL RICHTER and KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The owner of the New York Post has agreed to delay by three days his threat to close down the brassy tabloid to give a union time to vote on a proposal to stem its $20-million-a-year losses. Peter S. Kalikow, who has lost more than $100 million on the paper, delayed the threatened shutdown to allow the paper's Newspaper Guild to present a giveback proposal to its 352 members Monday evening.
BUSINESS
September 13, 1990 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The management and unions of the cash-strapped New York Post labored Wednesday through a second day of contract negotiations that could permanently stop the presses at the city's third-largest and loudest daily newspaper. As they worked toward a Friday deadline, each side hailed what they said was the other's good-faith efforts. But it wasn't clear that the unions would be willing to make the sacrifices that owner Peter S.
BUSINESS
September 15, 1990 | PAUL RICHTER and KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The owner of the New York Post has agreed to delay by three days his threat to close down the brassy tabloid to give a union time to vote on a proposal to stem its $20-million-a-year losses. Peter S. Kalikow, who has lost more than $100 million on the paper, delayed the threatened shutdown to allow the paper's Newspaper Guild to present a giveback proposal to its 352 members Monday evening.
BUSINESS
September 13, 1990 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The management and unions of the cash-strapped New York Post labored Wednesday through a second day of contract negotiations that could permanently stop the presses at the city's third-largest and loudest daily newspaper. As they worked toward a Friday deadline, each side hailed what they said was the other's good-faith efforts. But it wasn't clear that the unions would be willing to make the sacrifices that owner Peter S.
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