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SPORTS
April 26, 1998 | ERIC SONDHEIMER
Here's the ultimate dilemma for 16-year-old Peter Tuber of Granada Hills High: In his wildest imagination, he must decide between playing his guitar on stage with Pantera at the Forum or pitching for the Dodgers at Dodger Stadium. Which one would he choose? Two years ago, Tuber determined he couldn't do both. He quit baseball to devote his free time to playing his guitar.
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SPORTS
April 26, 1998 | ERIC SONDHEIMER
Here's the ultimate dilemma for 16-year-old Peter Tuber of Granada Hills High: In his wildest imagination, he must decide between playing his guitar on stage with Pantera at the Forum or pitching for the Dodgers at Dodger Stadium. Which one would he choose? Two years ago, Tuber determined he couldn't do both. He quit baseball to devote his free time to playing his guitar.
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SPORTS
August 17, 1995 | RICK SCHULTE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Northridge's pitching ace couldn't do it Tuesday on the mound, but he got it done Wednesday at the plate. Nathaniel Dunlap, who suffered his first loss of the season in the Junior League World Series opener against South Lake Charles, La., came up with a second-inning single to drive in two runs and spur Northridge to a 3-1 victory over South Point, Ohio.
SPORTS
August 11, 1995
The Northridge Little League 13-year-old all-star team suffered its second postseason loss Thursday night, bowing to Oak Grove Little League of San Jose, 8-1, in the Junior Regional tournament at American River College in Sacramento. The teams play again tonight at 7, with the winner qualifying as the Western Region representative for the Junior World Series in Taylor, Mich. Northridge will pitch its ace, Nathaniel Dunlap, who defeated Oak Grove, 11-1, Tuesday night.
SPORTS
May 26, 1999 | ERIC SONDHEIMER
Determined to gain respect for the East Valley League, No. 13-seeded Grant High pulled off the biggest upset in the first round of the City Championship baseball playoffs. The Lancers relied on power hitting and two shutout innings from reliever Frank Amaya to defeat No. 4-seeded Granada Hills, 7-6, on Tuesday at Granada Hills.
SPORTS
August 2, 1995
The pitching and batting of Marshall Plouffe kept Northridge Little League alive Tuesday in the Major Divisional tournament at Mission Viejo. Northridge defeated Hacienda Heights, 11-0, in a loser's bracket game. Plouffe pitched five innings, retiring 13 of 15 batters by strikeouts, and hit a home run. Northridge will face Diamond Bar today at 5:30 p.m. * Matt Riordan of Westlake High will play for the United States in a Goodwill Series in South Korea.
SPORTS
December 31, 1994 | STEVE HENSON
Dubbed the Earthquake Kids, the Northridge Little League team shook the youth baseball world by storming to the national championship in August. Thanks in part to the major league baseball strike, Northridge was the focus of national media attention throughout the World Series in Williamsport, Pa. Representing the West Region, Northridge rebounded from a loss in its first game to win three in a row and defeated Springfield, Va., 3-0, for the national championship.
SPORTS
August 28, 1994 | STEVE HENSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The ticket problem that had a few Northridge parents threatening to keep their sons from taking the field Saturday was resolved by diligent effort on the part of Pat Cunningham and Paula Mort.
SPORTS
August 12, 1995 | JOHN ORTEGA
Nathaniel Dunlap threw a six-hitter and Peter Tuber, Spencer Gordon and Mike Frost each had two hits as the Northridge Little League 13-year-old all-star team defeated Oak Grove of San Jose, 7-1, in the championship game of the Junior Western Regional tournament Friday night at American River College in Sacramento. With the victory, Northridge (16-2) advanced to the Junior World Series in Taylor, Mich. The eight-team tournament starts Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1994
You probably thought that the baseball strike took place because of the threat of player salary caps and team owners griping over revenues. Wrong. The purpose (or at least the result) was to give a bunch of boys from Northridge more of the limelight than they ever could have imagined.
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