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Peter Viertel

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2007 | Jon Thurber, Times Staff Writer
Peter Viertel, the novelist, memoirist and screenwriter best known for his books chronicling episodes in the lives of Ernest Hemingway and John Huston, has died. He was 86. Viertel died of lymphoma Sunday in the Spanish coastal resort of Marbella, according to Paula Kane, a family friend. His death came less than three weeks after his wife of 47 years, actress Deborah Kerr, died in Suffolk, England, also at 86.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2007 | Jon Thurber, Times Staff Writer
Peter Viertel, the novelist, memoirist and screenwriter best known for his books chronicling episodes in the lives of Ernest Hemingway and John Huston, has died. He was 86. Viertel died of lymphoma Sunday in the Spanish coastal resort of Marbella, according to Paula Kane, a family friend. His death came less than three weeks after his wife of 47 years, actress Deborah Kerr, died in Suffolk, England, also at 86.
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NEWS
February 28, 1995 | ELAINE KENDALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The epigraph for this appealing novel is the rule for Hollywood gin rummy, a variation of the game in which one player is dealt 11 cards; the other, 10. After the first hand has been played, the loser always deals. Although Robert Masters, the engaging narrator, seems to consider himself a loser, he's far too resilient, charming and genial to deserve the label. His self-esteem may be a degree or two below normal, but that merely lends his prose a pleasantly ironic edge.
NEWS
February 28, 1995 | ELAINE KENDALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The epigraph for this appealing novel is the rule for Hollywood gin rummy, a variation of the game in which one player is dealt 11 cards; the other, 10. After the first hand has been played, the loser always deals. Although Robert Masters, the engaging narrator, seems to consider himself a loser, he's far too resilient, charming and genial to deserve the label. His self-esteem may be a degree or two below normal, but that merely lends his prose a pleasantly ironic edge.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1990 | JACK MATHEWS
'I 've got a little proposition to make you," he said, enjoying the moment. "How would you like to go to Africa?" "Sure, " I said, living up to his notion of me. "Where in Africa?" "Darkest Africa," he said. "The very darkest bloody corner of Africa we can find."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1989 | Claudia Puig, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Clint Eastwood, in Zimbabwe to film his latest movie, said Sunday that he hoped his first African film venture will encourage the conservation of wild animals, particularly the African elephant. The movie, "White Hunter, Black Heart," will criticize the obsessional hunting of big game animals for ivory or souvenirs, Eastwood said. "I think it is better in the long run to have animals alive than dead trinkets," he said. "I personally will not buy ivory for this reason." He is producer, director and star of the movie, based on Peter Viertel's novel set in Africa during the filming of John Huston's classic "The African Queen."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1990 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
You see, movies are all foolishness . . . an exercise in insanity . . . pure madness. . . . But, as we're in this thing, well, we might as well bluff our way through to the bitter end. --John Wilson, in Peter Viertel's "White Hunter, Black Heart." Films about moviemaking often veer between honey and gall: the sweetness of self-celebration, the acid of iconoclasm. In "White Hunter, Black Heart" (citywide), Clint Eastwood reaches for the acid.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1989 | David Pecchia \f7
Eyewitness to Murder (Armritraj). Shooting in L.A. Thriller with Andrew Stevens protecting an artist who witnesses the murder of the gallery owner at one of her shows. It's tricky here because she's blinded during the homicide and must escape someone whom she cannot see, a la "Wait Until Dark." Executive producer Ahsok Armritraj. Producer Victor Bhalla. Director Jag Mundhra. Screenwriters Karen Baldwin and Michael Potts. Also stars Baldwin, Sherilyn Walter, Adrian Zmed and Carl Strano.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1990 | MICHELA WRONG, REUTERS
The usually taciturn Clint Eastwood's acting career takes a new turn in "White Hunter, Black Heart," which received its world premiere in Cannes today. Eastwood sprang to fame as the near-silent hero of "spaghetti" westerns and pared his script down to little more than a husky "Make my day" as detective Dirty Harry. But he waxes positively wordy in his role as devil-may-care director John Wilson, a closely modeled portrait of the legendary John Huston.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1990 | From United Press International
Actress Marisa Berenson has been a jet-setter, a chic international figure, as a child, as a girl and as a young woman living in Paris and Manhattan. She is, after all, a granddaughter of fashion designer Elsa Schiaparelli and she led a charmed and somewhat indulged life as an offspring of the rich and famous. Berenson, tall and elegant, made her major movie debut 15 years ago co-starring with Ryan O'Neal in Stanley Kubrick's "Barry Lyndon." Playing an 18th-Century aristocrat came easily to her.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1990 | JACK MATHEWS
'I 've got a little proposition to make you," he said, enjoying the moment. "How would you like to go to Africa?" "Sure, " I said, living up to his notion of me. "Where in Africa?" "Darkest Africa," he said. "The very darkest bloody corner of Africa we can find."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1990 | SUZY PATTERSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The 43rd Cannes Film Festival opening Thursday offers a world view of the cinema that reflects rapidly changing events. Movies from Eastern Europe, the Far East and Africa are among the 19 films competing for the Golden Palm award during the 12 days of competition. Saturday will be devoted to "Europe 90, Cinema Without Borders" for meetings and discussions between filmmakers from East and West, marking new freedoms enjoyed by Eastern Europe's film industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1994 | GENE SEYMOUR, NEWSDAY
The Deborah Kerr line that everyone remembers from the 1956 film "Tea and Sympathy" is, of course, the one she delivers as she's about to sexually initiate an anguished prep school student: "When you speak of this in future years, and you will, be kind." Earlier in the film, however, there's a less portentous but more intriguing exchange between Kerr, as the compassionate housemaster's wife, and the student (John Kerr, no relation) about the vagaries of romance.
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