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Peteris Vasks

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May 19, 1990 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the tension surrounding Latvia's May 4 declaration of independence from the Soviet Union escalates, one person watching the news with special concern is Latvian composer Peteris Vasks. "Friends and relatives and countrymen are keeping me informed all the time," Vasks said in a phone interview from New York.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1990 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the tension surrounding Latvia's May 4 declaration of independence from the Soviet Union escalates, one person watching the news with special concern is Latvian composer Peteris Vasks. "Friends and relatives and countrymen are keeping me informed all the time," Vasks said in a phone interview from New York.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1989 | Chris Pasles
You would think that concert tickets that cost less than a Pepsi might draw a big crowd. But that isn't always the case, as Micah Levy, founding music director of the Orange County Chamber Orchestra, discovered during his recent 10-day stay in Riga, Latvia. Levy traveled to the Soviet Union in May to meet with Latvian composer Peteris Vasks and to conduct a chamber orchestra made up of members of the Latvian State Symphony.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1989 | Chris Pasles
You would think that concert tickets that cost less than a Pepsi might draw a big crowd. But that isn't always the case, as Micah Levy, founding music director of the Orange County Chamber Orchestra, discovered during his recent 10-day stay in Riga, Latvia. Levy traveled to the Soviet Union in May to meet with Latvian composer Peteris Vasks and to conduct a chamber orchestra made up of members of the Latvian State Symphony.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1989 | CHRIS PASLES
Micah Levy, founding music director of the 6-year-old Orange County Chamber Orchestra, will go to the Soviet Union to conduct the Chamber Orchestra of the State Symphony of Riga, Latvia, on May 22. Levy will lead the 25-member ensemble in works by Samuel Barber, Ernst Bloch, Aaron Copland and Ellen Taaffe Zwilich. The concert will be seen on Soviet television. During his visit, which begins May 9, Levy also plans to meet with Latvian composer Peteris Vasks and to bring back cassette tapes and scores of his music for performance by the Orange County Chamber Orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 1990 | GREG HETTMANSBERGER
The finest music-making at the latest concert by the Orange County Chamber Orchestra came in the bleakest piece, the U.S. premiere of "Musica Dolorosa." Written in 1983 by the 44-year-old Latvian, Peteris Vasks, the composition made a palpably sobering impression when Micah Levy conducted it before a half-capacity audience Sunday at St. Joseph Center. A prayerful opening reminiscent of Barber led to march-like pizzicatos and bow-bouncing a la Bartok.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2000 | DANIEL CARIAGA
As he proved again this week, when Yakov Kreizberg is on the podium of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the orchestra is in good hands. The 40-year-old Russian-born conductor led the Philharmonic through a program of works by Beethoven, Peteris Vasks and Shostakovich in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion on Thursday night and, with strong help from the orchestra, produced convincing and authoritative performances.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1999 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For its appearance in the Brunch Classics series at the John Anson Ford Amphitheatre Sunday morning, the Miami String Quartet spanned three centuries of music, without blinking. From the Haydn trove, the F-minor Quartet, Opus 20, No. 5; the hum-along chestnut of Borodin's Quartet No. 2 in D; and a 1990s-vintage work added up to a balanced musical affair, and, likewise, the playing. Cohesion is the byword with this group, with no unequal strengths in the collective fabric.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2002 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Brilliant solos and felicitous programming came together during the first Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra performance of 2002, Friday night in UCLA's Royce Hall. Pianist Robert Levin was the guest, joined in the spotlight by music director Jeffrey Kahane for the most famous of Mozart's concertos for two pianos. There were other bonuses as well, including trumpeters David Washburn and Darren Mulder, featured in Vivaldi's Concerto in C for two trumpets.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2009 | Richard S. Ginell
The highly accomplished polyglot string ensemble iPalpiti wrapped its annual Festival of International Laureates at Walt Disney Concert Hall on Saturday night, about a month later than usual. Aside from the late date, all else was in place for those who miss hearing classical music in downtown L.A. during the long summer months when the Hollywood Bowl expropriates the field. The two big works on the program have become iPalpiti staples in past summers -- the Concerto for Piano and Violin by Mendelssohn, who wrote it when he was 14, and Mahler's tasteful, tasty inflation of Beethoven's String Quartet No. 11 for string ensemble.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2012 | By Richard S. Ginell
Gustavo Dudamel's hugely ambitious finishing kick to his 2011-12 Los Angeles Philharmonic season began Thursday night - but not quite as originally planned.   The program was supposed to have been something quite different - a unified trilogy of Scandinavian and Baltic music - but Grieg and Sibelius were eventually dropped and in their places were two not-quite-mainstream Mozart compositions, the Adagio and Fugue K. 546 and “Posthorn Serenade.” Then, as of Tuesday, the Adagio and Fugue had been dropped, replaced by the presumably-easier-to-prepare Overture to “The Marriage Of Figaro.”   Given the orchestra's looming production of “Don Giovanni” next week, this makes programming sense, turning May into Mozart Month at Walt Disney Concert Hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1998 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Prospect Street, with its spectacular ocean views and beautiful young beach crowd, can seem a world away from Manhattan's Upper West Side. There is certainly no Zabars, the popular New York delicatessen where one regularly runs into musicians or writers. Instead, a short walk up from the Contemporary Art Museum, where the La Jolla Chamber Music Society holds its SummerFest, is a coffeehouse with homey living-room furniture and a policy that admonishes against reading.
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