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Petraeus

NATIONAL
November 19, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Lawmakers on Sunday targeted U.N. Ambassador Susan Rice's talking points about the Sept. 11 attack on a U.S. diplomatic post in Benghazi, Libya, vowing to find out who changed the original language and why. The incident left four Americans dead, including Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens. Days later, Rice said the administration's preliminary view was that the attack was a spontaneous reaction to an anti-Islamic video, rather than a planned terrorist attack. But Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.)
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
It's "Homeland" meets "The Real Housewives" - and it's hands down the best serialized show on TV. It's "Dallas" in military drag, in which a ridiculously retro social order (who knew that "socialites" and "hostesses" even existed anymore, never mind in Tampa) slams into the high-tech world of cyberstalking - only to reveal a story as old as the written word: The Case of the Compromising Love Letter. GRAPHIC: Who's who | Gen. Petraeus Scandal Honestly, when will cheating couples finally learn to keep their declarations of passion out of anything that could conceivably be stolen by a lady's maid, discovered by a suspicious spouse or unearthed by a cyber sleuth?
NATIONAL
November 16, 2012 | By Ken Dilanian
Los Angeles Times WASHINGTON - Appearing before two congressional committees in closed-door sessions, former CIA Director David H. Petraeus did little to ease the partisan divide over whether Obama administration officials misled the public after heavily armed militants killed four Americans in the Libyan city of Benghazi, lawmakers said Friday. Petraeus told the House and Senate intelligence committees that he believed almost immediately that the Sept. 11 assault was an organized terrorist attack, according to lawmakers and staff sources.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2012 | Ed Stockly
Click here to download TV listings for the week Nov. 18 - 24 in PDF format This week's TV Movies     SATURDAY Good Morning America (N) 7 a.m. KABC The Chris Matthews Show Dan Rather; Sam Donaldson; Katty Kay; Jodi Kantor. (N) 11 a.m. KNBC, Sunday 5:30 a.m. KNBC McLaughlin Group 6:30 p.m. KCET SUNDAY Today Matthew Broderick. (N) 6 a.m. KNBC Good Morning America (N) 6 a.m. KABC State of the Union Fiscal cliff negotiations: Sen. Richard J. Durbin (D-Ill.)
NEWS
November 16, 2012 | By Ken Dilanian, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
WASHINGTON - Appearing before two congressional committees in closed-door sessions, former CIA Director David Petraeus did little to dispel the partisan divide over whether Obama administration officials misled the public in the days after heavily armed militants killed four Americans in Benghazi,Libya,  lawmakers said Friday. Petraeus told the House and Senate intelligence committees that he believed almost immediately that the Sept. 11 assault was an organized terrorist attack, according to lawmakers and staff sources.
NATIONAL
November 16, 2012 | By David Horsey
Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower was lucky there was no such thing as email during the Second World War. His romantic relationship with his lovely Irish driver, Kay Summersby, did not come to light for decades and did not keep him from leading the D-Day Invasion, becoming the first supreme commander of NATO or rising to the presidency. Gen. David Petraeus was not so fortunate. He tried to hide an affair with his attractive biographer and jogging partner, Paula Broadwell, by using a dropbox that would evade any email trail.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 2012 | Sandy Banks
It seemed at first like a welcome break from political overload. There's nothing like a juicy sex scandal to relieve election fatigue. But this one, it turns out, brims with suggestions of military misconduct and questions of national security that have talking heads droning about matters of policy while most of us just want the dope on disgraced generals, the West Point vixen and Kardashian-esque identical twins. By now, we are all caught up on the basics of the scandal that brought down C.I.A.
OPINION
November 16, 2012 | By Jonathan Zimmerman
In 1954, psychologist Benjamin Karpman wrote a prescient book about "sexual offenders" in the United States. Karpman focused especially on homosexuals who were drummed out of government jobs on the grounds that their sexual orientation made them security risks. If you were gay, the argument went, you were susceptible to blackmail by communist spies. But the real problem lay in the taboo on homosexuality, which paved the way for exactly the kind of extortion that the government feared.
NATIONAL
November 16, 2012 | By David S. Cloud and Ken Dilanian, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - Shortly before David H. Petraeus took charge at the CIA in September 2011, he stood on a sunny parade ground in his Army dress uniform, his wife at his side, and enjoyed a military retirement ceremony unlike any in recent memory. A band played patriotic marches, a formation of soldiers crisply saluted, and the nation's top commanders praised him as the greatest officer of his generation for averting a U.S. defeat in Iraq and rescuing the war in Afghanistan. "You now stand among the giants not just in our time but of all time, joining the likes of Grant and Pershing and Marshall and Eisenhower as one of the great battle captains of American history," proclaimed Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, as hundreds cheered and Petraeus beamed.
OPINION
November 15, 2012 | By Sarah Chayes
The scandal enveloping members of America's adulated top brass is the deepest crisis to hit the military in decades. It is a crisis President Obama did not need - shaming the country and increasing his burden during a major transition on his national security team. And yet, crisis can be a great corrective. Obama should use this one to reverse one of the most dysfunctional elements of U.S. foreign policy over the last decade: an infatuation with military solutions to problems that are fundamentally political.
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