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Petroglyphs

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2012 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
BISHOP, Calif. - Ancient hunters and gatherers etched vivid petroglyphs on cliffs in the Eastern Sierra that withstood winds, flash floods and earthquakes for more than 3,500 years. Thieves needed only a few hours to cut them down and haul them away. Federal authorities say at least four petroglyphs have been taken from the site. A fifth was defaced with deep saw cuts on three sides. A sixth had been removed and broken during the theft, then propped against a boulder near a visitor parking lot. Dozens of other petroglyphs were scarred by hammer strikes and saw cuts.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
Federal investigators acting on a tip have recovered five petroglyph panels that thieves cut from an eastern Sierra site sacred to Native Americans, U.S. Bureau of Land Management officials said Thursday. The location of the petroglyphs, stolen last fall, was disclosed in an anonymous letter to authorities. By failing to sign the letter, its author walked away from a $9,000 reward - a sign that the tip may have come from the thieves themselves. Experts had said the petroglyphs would fetch little money from collectors and would be difficult to fence because of widespread publicity about the theft.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
Federal investigators acting on a tip have recovered five petroglyph panels that thieves cut from an eastern Sierra site sacred to Native Americans, U.S. Bureau of Land Management officials said Thursday. The location of the petroglyphs, stolen last fall, was disclosed in an anonymous letter to authorities. By failing to sign the letter, its author walked away from a $9,000 reward - a sign that the tip may have come from the thieves themselves. Experts had said the petroglyphs would fetch little money from collectors and would be difficult to fence because of widespread publicity about the theft.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2012 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
BISHOP, Calif. - Ancient hunters and gatherers etched vivid petroglyphs on cliffs in the Eastern Sierra that withstood winds, flash floods and earthquakes for more than 3,500 years. Thieves needed only a few hours to cut them down and haul them away. Federal authorities say at least four petroglyphs have been taken from the site. A fifth was defaced with deep saw cuts on three sides. A sixth had been removed and broken during the theft, then propped against a boulder near a visitor parking lot. Dozens of other petroglyphs were scarred by hammer strikes and saw cuts.
NEWS
August 27, 1990 | MICHAEL HAEDERLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The nation's newest national monument occupies the least likely of sites--7,300 acres of rock, grass and desert sagebrush along the blackened edge of an ancient lava flow bordered by sprawling housing developments. But it was here that the ancestors of modern-day Pueblo Indians etched more than 15,000 petroglyphs into huge basalt boulders, creating a vast gallery of sacred images that one expert has described as "an outdoor church."
NEWS
December 20, 1994 | LEE DYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They passed this way for thousands of years, pausing at a desolate hillside to leave their marks. Crude drawings of four-legged animals and other creatures of their experience were pecked into the volcanic rocks of the Hedgpeth Hills for reasons that are not fully understood. Little is known about who they were or why they came. But the petroglyphs created over scores of generations shout one message quite clearly.
TRAVEL
November 5, 2006 | Rosie Mestel, Times Staff Writer
THERE are some nifty pictures to be seen in them thar hills -- once, that is, you've risen at the crack of dawn, obtained security clearance, had your car searched, listened to a pep talk from the local police and driven deep into a weapons testing base. The pictures, or rather petroglyphs, are well worth the inconvenience.
NEWS
March 19, 1995 | TIM KORTE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
On the west side of Albuquerque, an irresistible force has encountered an immovable object. The force is progress, in the form of a proposed six-lane highway that would open the way for this booming city to expand farther west. The steadfast object is the 17-mile-long Petroglyph National Monument--about 17,000 religious etchings on volcanic rock, created by Native Americans through the centuries. Authorities want to cut a 300-foot-wide, quarter-mile-long band through the monument's lava rock, destroying between two and 10 petroglyphs to build the extension of the Paseo del Norte roadway.
MAGAZINE
May 17, 1998 | ADRIAN MAHER, Adrian Maher is a frequent contributor to The Times
Deeply etched spider webs. A bear paw with seven claws. And everywhere, bighorn sheep, thousands of them. Just a three-hour drive from the place now known as Los Angeles, in a 1,200-square-mile patch of the Eastern Sierra's Coso Mountains, ancient inhabitants meticulously carved more than 100,000 images onto lava rock walls, crags and boulders. Today, the Navy is just as relentless in bombarding the surrounding desert. High-powered lasers lash the hills. Missiles obliterate surplus Army trucks.
NEWS
December 30, 1994 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pounding surf and buffeting winds slowly chip away the sandstone walls of a cave on San Nicolas Island, erasing the only rock art left by a tribe of mysterious ancient islanders. Many of the whales or fish icons chiseled into the stone are no longer visible. The black painted pictographs can barely be distinguished from the blue-green algae that cling to the crumbling surface. Archeologists want to protect the artwork from further deterioration at the remote site they call Cave of the Whales.
TRAVEL
November 28, 2010 | By James Dorsey, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Reporting from the Providence Mountains State Recreation Area, Calif. There's Down Under, like the story on New Zealand on the left side of this page, and then there's down under. I chose the latter. Like that journey, my trip to the Providence Mountains State Recreation Area, about four hours east of Los Angeles, introduced me to a world I'd never experienced. And because this is California, the colorful subterranean wonderland of the area's Mitchell Caverns come with a story that's tailor-made for the movies.
TRAVEL
May 9, 2010 | By Dan Blackburn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Every so often I experience a genuine "oh my gosh" moment. In Africa, I rounded a bend and came face to face with a large male lion. In Wyoming, driving south from Yellowstone, I rounded a curve and saw the Tetons rising majestically from the valley floor. And, most recently, in Nevada, as I crested a hill on the drab road through the Muddy Mountains, I saw the Valley of Fire. Sculpted, chiseled and twisted red rock formations more dramatic than most others I have seen dominated the park's 35,000 acres.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2009 | By Louis Sahagun
Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) says she plans to introduce legislation today to establish two national monuments on roughly 1 million acres of Mojave Desert outback that is home to bighorn sheep and desert tortoises, extinct volcanoes, sand dunes and ancient petroglyphs. Its centerpiece, Mojave Trails National Monument, would prohibit development on 941,000 acres of federal land and former railroad company property along a 105-mile stretch of old Route 66, between Ludlow and Needles.
TRAVEL
June 1, 2008 | Jay Jones, Special to The Times
If Las Vegas is the rock star of the gambling world, energetic with plenty of edge, then Laughlin is the lounge singer -- thinning on top and slightly off-key. Still, that lounge act is entertaining in a curious sort of way and, best of all, there's no cover charge. Laughlin, Nev., which hugs the banks of the Colorado River about 30 miles north of Needles, Calif., boasts 11 hotel-casinos with more than 10,000 rooms. The town has been called "Vegas Lite" and "Vegas Junior."
TRAVEL
November 5, 2006 | Rosie Mestel, Times Staff Writer
THERE are some nifty pictures to be seen in them thar hills -- once, that is, you've risen at the crack of dawn, obtained security clearance, had your car searched, listened to a pep talk from the local police and driven deep into a weapons testing base. The pictures, or rather petroglyphs, are well worth the inconvenience.
NEWS
July 9, 2006 | Scott Sonner, Associated Press Writer
In a case with ramifications for archeological treasures across the West, the Justice Department is asking the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals to reconsider a ruling that freed two men convicted of stealing ancient petroglyphs in Nevada. "There is a good deal at stake here," said Sherry Hutt, a former Superior Court judge from Arizona who has written books on the subject and now heads a related program at the National Park Service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1995
Your story "Gripping Drama: Movie Paint Job Upsets Stoney Point Climbers" (April 7) reports the outrage felt by rock climbers over the Los Angeles Recreation and Parks Department's authorizing the painting of sandstone boulders at Stoney Point Park to make them more photogenic for Hollywood movie filming. As a San Fernando Valley resident who takes my small children on hikes in this park, I was dismayed by this abuse of what, despite much trash and graffiti, is still a wonderful park.
TRAVEL
March 2, 1986 | JULIE D. TAYLOR, Taylor is a Mission Viejo free-lance writer. and
Strange and mystifying shapes, immediately capturing the imagination, literally cover the jumbled piles of boulders that form the canyon wall. On one rock a boldly etched stick figure clutches a wooden shaft weighted near one end; nearby a group of sheep tries to outrun a hunter; above, a painted body in feathered headdress glares at me through one large central eye. It was intriguing, as I gazed about Renegade Canyon, that only a few people know of this place.
TRAVEL
May 16, 2004 | Kathryn Wilkens, Special to The Times
"We've got a problem up here!" Alarm colored the voice of wrangler Bryon Himelick, who was ahead on the trail. I clambered onto a shelf of sandstone to get a better view. Two llamas had slipped their guide ropes, walked off the trail and into a brown puddle. The 3-year-old named Howell was in quicksand up to his panniers. In seconds, Bryon and the two other guides shucked off their backpacks, raced to the llamas and gently pulled them back to solid ground.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 2002 | GARY POLAKOVIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under the shady cliffs beside a spring at the bottom of a canyon in the Grapevine Mountains, Shoshone Indians once sought respite from Death Valley's wilting heat and marked their passing by etching images on a room-size slab of granite. One symbol depicts a bighorn sheep, one a snake, but the rest are difficult to discern, lost to erosion and a blur of modern graffiti including a smiley face, crosses and scribbled initials.
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