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Petroleum Recycling Corp

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1992 | RICK HOLGUIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The district attorney's office has filed criminal charges against a Signal Hill oil recycling company, alleging that the firm illegally stored more than 175,000 gallons of hazardous oil waste in a tank at an abandoned oil refinery in Long Beach. Petroleum Recycling Corp. will be arraigned Wednesday in Long Beach Municipal Court on one felony count of illegally storing hazardous waste and one misdemeanor count of storing hazardous waste without a permit, said Deputy Dist. Atty. Joseph P.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1992
A Signal Hill oil recycling company pleaded no contest Tuesday to a misdemeanor charge of illegally storing about 100,000 gallons of oil-laden waste water at an abandoned Long Breach refinery and paid $60,000 in fines. Superior Court Judge Richard F. Charvat closed the case against Petroleum Recycling Corp. after hearing testimony that the firm had removed and properly disposed of the waste in a tank at Wright Terminals in Long Beach, said Deputy Dist. Atty. Joseph P. Charney.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1992
A Signal Hill oil recycling company pleaded no contest Tuesday to a misdemeanor charge of illegally storing about 100,000 gallons of oil-laden waste water at an abandoned Long Breach refinery and paid $60,000 in fines. Superior Court Judge Richard F. Charvat closed the case against Petroleum Recycling Corp. after hearing testimony that the firm had removed and properly disposed of the waste in a tank at Wright Terminals in Long Beach, said Deputy Dist. Atty. Joseph P. Charney.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1992 | RICK HOLGUIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The district attorney's office has filed criminal charges against a Signal Hill oil recycling company, alleging that the firm illegally stored more than 175,000 gallons of hazardous oil waste in a tank at an abandoned oil refinery in Long Beach. Petroleum Recycling Corp. will be arraigned Wednesday in Long Beach Municipal Court on one felony count of illegally storing hazardous waste and one misdemeanor count of storing hazardous waste without a permit, said Deputy Dist. Atty. Joseph P.
BUSINESS
May 8, 1991 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Signal Hill oil recycling firm and two other companies were the targets of a daylong search Tuesday by state and local investigators seeking evidence that the recycling firm illegally shipped and stored toxic wastes, officials said. Three locations of Petroleum Recycling Corp., which treats waste oil for resale as ship bunker fuel, were searched by an environmental strike force headed by the Signal Hill Police Department and the Los Angeles County district attorney's office.
NEWS
February 13, 1992 | RICK HOLGUIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The district attorney's office has filed criminal charges against a Signal Hill oil recycling company, alleging that the firm illegally stored more than 175,000 gallons of hazardous oil waste in a tank at an abandoned oil refinery in Long Beach. Petroleum Recycling Corp. will be arraigned Feb. 19 in Long Beach Municipal Court on one felony count of illegally storing hazardous waste and one misdemeanor count of storing hazardous waste without a permit, said Deputy Dist. Atty. Joseph P.
NEWS
March 12, 1992
A lawyer representing a Signal Hill oil recycling company pleaded innocent this week to charges that the firm illegally stored more than 200,000 gallons of flammable liquid oil waste at an abandoned refinery in Long Beach. Petroleum Recycling Corp. was charged last month with one felony count of illegally storing hazardous waste and a misdemeanor count of storing hazardous waste without a permit, Deputy Dist. Atty. David Guthman said. Long Beach Municipal Court Judge Bradford L.
NEWS
November 17, 1994 | STEVE EAMES
Petroleum Recycling Corp. of Signal Hill and three of its executives have been cleared of charges that they let toxic rainwater run off their parking lot and into city streets in 1993. The 38-count criminal complaint was dismissed for lack of evidence last week by Long Beach Superior Court Judge Richard R. Romero. Petroleum Recycling and its officials--President Richard Davis McAuley, compliance officer Ronald R.
NEWS
January 20, 1994
Three officers of a crude-oil cleaning and storage facility here have been charged with dumping toxic rainwater onto city streets. The district attorney's office filed a 38-count felony and misdemeanor complaint against Petroleum Recycling Corp., President Richard Davis McAuley, compliance officer Ronald R. Daerr and plant manager Mark James Vigeant.
NEWS
April 7, 1994
Three executives of a crude-oil cleaning and storage facility have pleaded innocent to charges that they dumped toxic rainwater onto city streets in 1993. A hearing was scheduled for April 25 in Long Beach Municipal Court for the Petroleum Recycling Corp. officials--Richard Davis McAuley, president; Ronald R. Daerr, compliance officer; and Mark James Vigeant, plant manager.
BUSINESS
May 8, 1991 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Signal Hill oil recycling firm and two other companies were the targets of a daylong search Tuesday by state and local investigators seeking evidence that the recycling firm illegally shipped and stored toxic wastes, officials said. Three locations of Petroleum Recycling Corp., which treats waste oil for resale as ship bunker fuel, were searched by an environmental strike force headed by the Signal Hill Police Department and the Los Angeles County district attorney's office.
NEWS
December 3, 1992 | RICK HOLGUIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The last of the huge tanks that held petroleum waste at an abandoned oil refinery in Long Beach has been drained, eliminating the danger of large spills or an explosion, officials said. "There is no imminent danger to people living around the site," said Rich Varenchik, a spokesman for the California Environmental Protection Agency.
NEWS
April 22, 1990 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When city leaders set out a decade ago to do something about the 360,000 tons of trash this town generates every year, they came up with a two-part plan: a recycling program environmentalists loved and a hulking incinerator they hated. Today, the incinerator sits less than half a mile from the sea, cremating an endless stream of household and commercial waste and converting the energy to electricity. As for the recycling program that was supposed to accompany it?
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