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Petty Theft

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1985 | JOHN NEEDHAM, Times Staff Writer
The man was 72 years old, had money in his pocket and credit cards in his wallet. Yet, he stole a set of socket wrenches. "He can't say why he did it," recalled Peggy Weatherspoon, manager of senior citizens' services in Orange County's Community Services Agency. "He was humiliated and ashamed and embarrassed and terrified. At age 72, he'd never been in the criminal justice system before."
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NEWS
October 22, 2000
I was greatly distressed by the mention of an elderly gentleman who was imprisoned 41 years ago for stealing $24 ("Images Locked in Time," Oct. 2). I admit that I do not know much about his case, but if this is the only crime that he committed, then certainly he has more than paid for his misdeed. We have young people going in and out of jail on second and third strikes, given chance after chance to redeem themselves, and here is a man who has spent these many years in jail for a petty theft that 30 days should have taken care of. KATHLEEN BUHARP Apple Valley
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2000 | TRACY WILSON
A former Ventura police officer convicted of shoplifting $25 worth of dog vitamins at a pet store was sentenced Thursday to three years' probation. David Matz, 58, pleaded no contest in Ventura County Superior Court on Jan. 6 to charges of petty theft and witness intimidation. Police say Matz walked into a Petco store in the 4000 block of East Main Street in August and took a $25 jar of dog vitamins from a shelf.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2009 | Tony Barboza
A jury convicted former Orange school board trustee Steve Rocco of petty theft Thursday for stealing a 14-ounce bottle of Heinz ketchup last September from a dining area at Chapman University. Rocco, an eccentric 58-year-old Santa Ana recluse known for wearing dark glasses and espousing shadowy theories about a powerful cabal he calls the Partnership, won a seat on the school board in 2004. He spent his term largely refusing to speak with colleagues, and survived a recall attempt.
NEWS
April 24, 2012 | By Dan Turner
Florida, it seems, has just gotten its very own Jerry Dewayne Williams. Mark Abaire, who has a history of petty theft in addition to an evident attitude problem, walked into a McDonald's restaurant in East Naples, Fla., recently and asked for a free courtesy cup. You're supposed to take this cup to the soda machine and fill it with water, but Abaire allegedly cheated: He filled it with about $1 worth of soda instead. When a manager asked him to pay, Abaire allegedly cursed at him and refused to leave, prompting employees to call police.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1987 | TRACEY KAPLAN, Times Staff Writer
Angered by the filing of a felony charge against a man accused of stealing a $1.49 package of bologna, Los Angeles County Dist. Atty. Ira Reiner on Thursday ordered a reduction of the charge to a misdemeanor and set an office policy of not filing felony charges against people accused of stealing small amounts of food. Reiner told Deputy Dist. Atty. Steven D.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1987 | TRACEY KAPLAN, Times Staff Writer
A 38-year-old transient with a history of petty thefts faces up to three years in state prison for stealing a $1.49 package of bologna and says he feels that prosecutors want to make an example of him. If Leonard James Hazlett was a first offender, said Deputy Dist. Atty. Steven D. Ogden, "this matter would have been dust. But it's extremely apparent that he has existed by stealing and is a career criminal." Items taken by Hazlett range from a case of cigarettes to a pair of pants. Deputy Dist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2013 | By Andrew Blankstein, Kate Mather and Richard Winton
As authorities continued to search for the main suspect in the kidnapping and sexual assault of a 10-year-old Northridge girl, they cautioned that the 30-year-old man could be in the San Diego area. San Diego police have distributed a flier warning that  Tobias Dustin Summers  should be considered armed and dangerous and asking anyone who sees him to call 911 immediately. When announcing the arrest of a man described as a "secondary suspect" in the case, Los Angeles police said Monday that detectives had reason to believe Summers could be in San Diego and that he may have changed his appearance by shaving his head.
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