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Pew Hispanic Center

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2012 | By Paloma Esquivel, Los Angeles Times
Growing up in the suburbs of Detroit, Helen Iris Torres responded to questions about her identity by telling people she was Puerto Rican. It didn't matter that schoolbooks referred to her as Hispanic. Now, as head of an organization that supports women of Latin American heritage, Torres still says she's a "proud Puerto Rican" but prefers the term Latina, which she says encompasses the larger community of Spanish speakers in the country. Torres' quandary is reflected in a new report by the Pew Hispanic Center, which suggests that the majority of people of Latin American descent choose to identify themselves by their countries of origin, over either Latino or Hispanic.
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BUSINESS
February 5, 2012 | By Don Lee, Los Angeles Times
After scraping by on handyman jobs for a year, Bert Qintana figured he'd have to leave his wife and teenage son at their home near Taos, N.M., and find work elsewhere. Then Qintana got a call last month from Chevron Mining, which runs a mine 20 miles away. Would he be interested in hauling muck from the molybdenum mine for $17.05 an hour? He leaped at the offer. "Thank God," said Qintana, 45, a Latino who had worked as a general contractor. "I was able to hang in there and not have to move.
NEWS
December 28, 2011 | By David Lauter
Latinos by a 2-to-1 margin disapprove of how President Obama is handing deportations of illegal residents, but by an even larger margin, Latino voters favor him over Mitt Romney, according to a new survey by the Pew Hispanic Center. The Obama administration has presided over a record number of deportations of illegal residents, a policy that has drawn extensive criticism from Latino leaders. By 59%-27%, Latinos - citizens and noncitizens - say they disapprove of how the administration is handling the issue.
NATIONAL
December 28, 2011 | By David Lauter, Washington Bureau
Latinos by a 2-1 margin disapprove of how President Obama is handling deportations of illegal residents, but by an even larger margin, Latino voters favor him over Mitt Romney, according to a new survey by the Pew Hispanic Center. The Obama administration has presided over a record number of deportations of illegal residents, a policy that has drawn extensive criticism from Latino leaders. By 59% to 27%, Latinos — citizens and noncitizens — say they disapprove of how the administration is handling the issue, according to the poll, released Wednesday.
OPINION
December 15, 2011 | Doyle McManus
Florida's new Republican senator, 40-year-old Marco Rubio, is handsome, personable and smart. He can talk with intelligence and ease about foreign policy, the federal budget and the aspirations of the American people. And he has a Reaganesque gift for sounding reassuring, even when he's arguing for Tea Party positions such as a complete overhaul of Social Security and Medicare. All these factors, along with his decisive electoral victory last year in Florida, one of the most important swing states in a presidential election, have vaulted Rubio to the top of the GOP's list of potential vice presidential candidates, no matter who the party's presidential nominee turns out to be. A big piece of that enthusiasm, of course, stems from the hope that Rubio would help the party make inroads with the fastest-growing ethnic group in America, Latinos, who have mostly turned a cold shoulder to the party.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 2011 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Harry Pachon, a scholar-activist who helped focus national attention on the needs and traits of a growing Latino population, particularly in politics and education, has died. He was 66. Pachon, the longtime president of the Tomas Rivera Policy Institute, had been ill for several months and died Friday at Kindred Hospital in Ontario. The cause was lung failure, said his son, Marc Pachon. A Claremont resident, Pachon had led the policy institute since 1993, when it operated at Claremont Graduate University as the Tomas Rivera Center.
NEWS
April 26, 2011 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
Despite strong recent turnouts at the polls, Latinos trail other groups when it comes to voting, according to an analysis of census data released Tuesday by the Pew Hispanic Center. More than 6.6 million Latinos went to the polls in the recent November midterm election, making the group a rich prize for Democrats and Republicans in the 2012 cycle, which includes a battle for the presidency and control of both houses of Congress. The growing Latino population, particularly in the Southwest and West, makes the group a pillar of support  for Democrats, who have been the beneficiaries of votes by Latinos, who generally favor the party’s position on immigration reform.
NATIONAL
February 2, 2011 | By Nicholas Riccardi, Los Angeles Times
After two years of declines, the number of illegal immigrants living in the U.S. was virtually unchanged last year, according to a report released Tuesday by the Pew Hispanic Center . The annual report, relied upon by both sides in the contentious immigration debate, found 11.2 million illegal immigrants living in the U.S., statistically identical to the 11.1 million estimated in 2009. The number peaked in 2007 at 12 million and dropped steadily as the economy collapsed. "It seems the decline has halted as of 2010," Jeffrey Passel, one of the report's authors, said in a conference call with reporters.
NEWS
October 5, 2010 | By Michael Muskal
Latinos, a key part of the Democratic coalition that helped put President Obama in the White House, have the same lack of enthusiasm as other voters but will likely vote Democratic in this year’s midterm election, according to a survey released Tuesday by the Pew Hispanic Center. The survey, based on bilingual telephone interviews with 1,375 Latinos from Aug. 17 through Sept. 19, shows that 65% of registered Latino voters said they plan to support a Democrat while 22% said they prefer a Republican.
OPINION
September 3, 2010
The number of immigrants entering the United States illegally has plummeted in tandem with the economy, with the greatest slowdown occurring between 2007 and 2009, according to a report issued Wednesday by the nonpartisan Pew Hispanic Center. Also, the number of people apprehended at the border is down dramatically, and furthermore, an estimated 1 million illegal immigrants have left the country. But the report, coming as the immigration reform debate turns increasingly ugly, is a timely reminder of how perception lags reality.
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