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Pharmaceutical Industry Mexico

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NEWS
May 23, 1999 | TRACY WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Medications banned or highly restricted in the United States because of severe, and sometimes fatal, side effects are being smuggled in from Mexico and peddled out of back-room shops across Southern California. These potentially dangerous drugs, which multinational pharmaceutical companies market in Mexico, where regulations and enforcement are less stringent, have shown up consistently in more than 70 raids over the last year of markets, dress shops and swap meets catering to Latino immigrants.
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NEWS
May 23, 1999 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is an open secret in Mexico that often ill-trained pharmacy clerks illegally diagnose and prescribe medications for millions of Mexicans every year, sometimes without mentioning potentially fatal side effects. "It is very probable that [pharmacies] are selling 3 or 4 million prescription drugs a day without prescriptions," said Dr. Luis Zavaleta, president of the Mexican Doctors Assn. "We as a population have to change our culture.
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NEWS
July 5, 1996 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a practiced eye, Arturo, a Tijuana taxi driver in an open-necked, baby-blue silk shirt, sizes up the tourists trudging off the footbridge from the United States. "Taxi, lady? You want pharmacy? I get you good pharmacy," he urges, stepping from a line of beckoning taxi drivers in big belts and straw cowboy hats. "Good prices! No prescriptions!" Soon he is nosing his long yellow Oldsmobile through scruffy streets choked with pharmacies.
NEWS
May 23, 1999 | TRACY WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Medications banned or highly restricted in the United States because of severe, and sometimes fatal, side effects are being smuggled in from Mexico and peddled out of back-room shops across Southern California. These potentially dangerous drugs, which multinational pharmaceutical companies market in Mexico, where regulations and enforcement are less stringent, have shown up consistently in more than 70 raids over the last year of markets, dress shops and swap meets catering to Latino immigrants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1998 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Juan Mendoza knew that the drugs he was selling in his family's East Los Angeles minimarket were not meant to be sold in the United States. But the products, which authorities said ranged from foot creams to antibiotics, were in great demand among his customers. Many of them were illegal immigrants, afraid to return to Mexico, where they would have been able to purchase those pharmaceuticals without a prescription in one of Tijuana's many farmacias.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1999 | JACK LEONARD and PETER M. WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Federal authorities said Monday they are investigating whether members of a Southern California family were illegally importing and selling prescription drugs that police believe may be connected to the death last month of an 18-month-old. A federal grand jury in San Diego has started probing allegations that members of the King family--with businesses and homes in Santa Ana, Tustin and Chula Vista--have smuggled Mexican pharmaceuticals from Tijuana, law enforcement sources said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1994
County public health officials are warning parents not to use a fever-suppressing drug sold in Mexico that may have contributed to the deaths of two Orange County toddlers in the last year. Dr. Hilde Meyers, a county epidemiologist, said the drug--known in Spanish as "neo-melubrina"--was banned in the United States in 1967 because it can cause a dangerous drop in white blood cells, which fight infections. Adverse reactions to the drug seem unrelated to the dosage or how long it is taken. Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1998 | HOPE HAMASHIGE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The investigation into the death of a 13-month-old boy at a Santa Ana medical clinic has unexpectedly led police to Orange County shops selling illegal prescription drugs from Mexico, investigators said Wednesday. The April 23 death of Christopher Martinez, allegedly at the hands of a man who passed himself off as a doctor but who had no medical license, led Santa Ana police to assemble a task force to investigate other clinics in the city.
NEWS
May 23, 1999 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is an open secret in Mexico that often ill-trained pharmacy clerks illegally diagnose and prescribe medications for millions of Mexicans every year, sometimes without mentioning potentially fatal side effects. "It is very probable that [pharmacies] are selling 3 or 4 million prescription drugs a day without prescriptions," said Dr. Luis Zavaleta, president of the Mexican Doctors Assn. "We as a population have to change our culture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1999 | JACK LEONARD and PETER M. WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Federal authorities said Monday they are investigating whether members of a Southern California family were illegally importing and selling prescription drugs that police believe may be connected to the death last month of an 18-month-old. A federal grand jury in San Diego has started probing allegations that members of the King family--with businesses and homes in Santa Ana, Tustin and Chula Vista--have smuggled Mexican pharmaceuticals from Tijuana, law enforcement sources said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1998 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Juan Mendoza knew that the drugs he was selling in his family's East Los Angeles minimarket were not meant to be sold in the United States. But the products, which authorities said ranged from foot creams to antibiotics, were in great demand among his customers. Many of them were illegal immigrants, afraid to return to Mexico, where they would have been able to purchase those pharmaceuticals without a prescription in one of Tijuana's many farmacias.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1998 | HOPE HAMASHIGE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The investigation into the death of a 13-month-old boy at a Santa Ana medical clinic has unexpectedly led police to Orange County shops selling illegal prescription drugs from Mexico, investigators said Wednesday. The April 23 death of Christopher Martinez, allegedly at the hands of a man who passed himself off as a doctor but who had no medical license, led Santa Ana police to assemble a task force to investigate other clinics in the city.
NEWS
July 5, 1996 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a practiced eye, Arturo, a Tijuana taxi driver in an open-necked, baby-blue silk shirt, sizes up the tourists trudging off the footbridge from the United States. "Taxi, lady? You want pharmacy? I get you good pharmacy," he urges, stepping from a line of beckoning taxi drivers in big belts and straw cowboy hats. "Good prices! No prescriptions!" Soon he is nosing his long yellow Oldsmobile through scruffy streets choked with pharmacies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1994
County public health officials are warning parents not to use a fever-suppressing drug sold in Mexico that may have contributed to the deaths of two Orange County toddlers in the last year. Dr. Hilde Meyers, a county epidemiologist, said the drug--known in Spanish as "neo-melubrina"--was banned in the United States in 1967 because it can cause a dangerous drop in white blood cells, which fight infections. Adverse reactions to the drug seem unrelated to the dosage or how long it is taken. Dr.
BUSINESS
October 26, 1992 | SUSAN MOFFAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every day, large quantities of prescription drugs are brought across the border from Tijuana into the United States in the purses and suitcases of ordinary Americans--most often senior citizens. Unable to afford skyrocketing U.S. drug prices, they make regular pilgrimages to Mexico to buy medications for high blood pressure, asthma, arthritis and a host of common ailments at a tenth or less the cost at home for identical or virtually identical drugs.
BUSINESS
October 26, 1992 | SUSAN MOFFAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every day, large quantities of prescription drugs are brought across the border from Tijuana into the United States in the purses and suitcases of ordinary Americans--most often senior citizens. Unable to afford skyrocketing U.S. drug prices, they make regular pilgrimages to Mexico to buy medications for high blood pressure, asthma, arthritis and a host of common ailments at a tenth or less the cost at home for identical or virtually identical drugs.
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