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Philip Anschutz

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HEALTH
March 14, 2013 | By Marla Dickerson and Walter Hamilton
AEG founder Philip Anschutz said in an exclusive interview with the Los Angeles Times that he pulled his sports and entertainment conglomerate off the market after having a change of heart and deciding to become actively "reengaged" in managing the company. Anschutz wouldn't directly address how many bids he received for AEG or what prices were offered. But he hinted strongly that the bids fell short of the $8 billion to $10 billion that he reportedly was seeking. "We were very clear from the start," Anschutz said in an hourlong interview in a conference room high atop L.A. Live.
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SPORTS
October 9, 2013 | Bill Dwyre
As far as the NFL and Los Angeles go, all is quiet on the Western front. Or maybe we just need to look more closely. The leading location remains AEG's downtown Farmers Field. Phil Anschutz's exclusive bargaining window is open until November 2014. It is "shovel-ready," as developers say. Money is in the bank. Entitlements have been taken care of. AEG is an owner-landlord in waiting. It is a quieter effort now, since Tim Leiweke left AEG. He was effective, hard-charging, persuasive, but never quiet.
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SPORTS
April 21, 2010 | By Helene Elliott
Philip Anschutz, who bought the Kings out of bankruptcy in 1995 and built Staples Center, hasn't gotten enough credit for stabilizing the franchise, NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman said Wednesday before the Kings faced the Vancouver Canucks at Staples Center in Game 4 of their playoff series. Anschutz, a Denver-based billionaire who regularly shuns interviews, has been vilified by fans who contend he ignores the team and bought it only to get a foothold in downtown real estate. Not so, Bettman said during an interview with The Times, adding that he had seen Anschutz's distaste for losing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - An influential state senator has a plan to allow electronic billboard ads that are currently banned by state law - including pitches for beer and gambling - next to a proposed NFL stadium in Los Angeles. The proposal, approved by a legislative committee, has outraged activists who oppose the proliferation of electronic billboards. They say lawmakers intend the measure as special treatment for Philip Anschutz, the Denver billionaire who wants to build the stadium in downtown Los Angeles.
SPORTS
March 14, 2013 | Sam Farmer
Philip Anschutz doesn't get pushed around. He's a billionaire who makes business deals with his head, not his heart. When he sets his mind to something, he stands firm. In other words, he's not likely to bring an NFL team back to Los Angeles. Throughout the Farmers Field process, it was Tim Leiweke, then president of AEG, who was keeping the concept alive, scrambling to keep all parties engaged, always selling the notion that a downtown L.A. stadium would not only work but would be the gem of the NFL. Without Leiweke as a buffer, we have two behemoths of business - Anschutz and the NFL - poised to bang heads again, each with distinctly different ideas of what a fair deal is. Anschutz told The Times that his decision to pull AEG off the sales block actually makes it more likely a team will return, not less.
SPORTS
February 1, 2011 | T.J. Simers
I was surprised to walk out of Tuesday's standing-room-only pep rally to find Farmers Field, L.A.'s new downtown football stadium, has yet to be built. From what everyone was saying inside the West Hall of the Convention Center, it's a done deal. I kept waiting for the San Diego Chargers to make a grand entrance, since they will be playing in the new joint. Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa was so pumped up he was already angling for tickets to Super Bowl 50. He reminded everyone he won't be mayor in 2016, but really wants to go to the game.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 2006 | Glenn F. Bunting, Times Staff Writer
On a warm summer evening in 2004, Philip Anschutz greeted British Deputy Prime Minister John Prescott at the $150-million soccer palace Anschutz had created in Carson. After settling into a luxury suite to watch the Los Angeles Galaxy battle the San Jose Earthquakes, Prescott asked Anschutz which side he was rooting for. "He said it didn't matter because he owned the two teams," Prescott recalled in an interview in London.
BUSINESS
April 5, 2007 | Glenn F. Bunting, Times Staff Writer
Since Philip Anschutz became one of the nation's youngest billionaires at 42, he has enjoyed a low profile. The publicity-shy tycoon routinely refuses to talk to reporters, even though he owns daily newspapers in San Francisco, Washington and Baltimore. The last time he sat down for an on-the-record interview was in 1974. Anschutz also prefers to stay out of courthouses, despite spending a small fortune on litigation and attorney fees.
SPORTS
December 15, 2010 | Sam Farmer
The stadium renderings are impressive. The sightlines are cool. And it's fun to imagine how an NFL game in the heart of Los Angeles might look. But we've seen dazzling L.A. stadium designs before. We've seen dozens of them over the last 15 years, in fact, and the nation's second-largest market still doesn't have an NFL team. What really matters this time is where Denver billionaire Philip Anschutz stands on all of this, and whether he's ready to invest the kind of money necessary to build the elaborate events center that his top executive, AEG's Tim Leiweke, envisions.
NEWS
July 15, 2004 | From Associated Press
The film company of Denver billionaire Philip Anschutz has agreed to work on five movies, including four based on award-winning children's books, in a deal with 20th Century Fox. Walden Media of the Anschutz Film Group would produce and develop the films with Fox, while Fox would distribute them. Financial details of the agreement were not disclosed.
SPORTS
March 14, 2013 | By Mike James
Philip Anschutz, who announced Thursday that he was terminating the sale of sports and entertainment giant AEG, said that the company is still interested in working out a deal to bring the NFL back to Los Angeles and that he was “optimistic” that would happen. But he also said, in a rare, wide-ranging interview with The Times, that while AEG, the city and state have all done what was needed to build a new stadium on the LA Live campus downtown,  the NFL now needs to be an active fourth party.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2013 | By Marla Dickerson and Mike James, Los Angeles Times
In an interview with the Los Angeles Times, AEG founder Philip Anschutz discussed his decision to pull his sports and entertainment conglomerate off the market, as well as Tim Leiweke's impending departure from the company. This is an edited transcript: Question: Tim Leiweke was the public face of AEG in Los Angeles. It's a surprise to see him leaving so abruptly. What happened? Answer: I think he made his decision based on the fact that I had terminated the process for the sale, combined with the opportunities that he's looking at elsewhere as well.
HEALTH
March 14, 2013 | By Marla Dickerson and Walter Hamilton
AEG founder Philip Anschutz said in an exclusive interview with the Los Angeles Times that he pulled his sports and entertainment conglomerate off the market after having a change of heart and deciding to become actively "reengaged" in managing the company. Anschutz wouldn't directly address how many bids he received for AEG or what prices were offered. But he hinted strongly that the bids fell short of the $8 billion to $10 billion that he reportedly was seeking. "We were very clear from the start," Anschutz said in an hourlong interview in a conference room high atop L.A. Live.
SPORTS
March 14, 2013 | Sam Farmer
Philip Anschutz doesn't get pushed around. He's a billionaire who makes business deals with his head, not his heart. When he sets his mind to something, he stands firm. In other words, he's not likely to bring an NFL team back to Los Angeles. Throughout the Farmers Field process, it was Tim Leiweke, then president of AEG, who was keeping the concept alive, scrambling to keep all parties engaged, always selling the notion that a downtown L.A. stadium would not only work but would be the gem of the NFL. Without Leiweke as a buffer, we have two behemoths of business - Anschutz and the NFL - poised to bang heads again, each with distinctly different ideas of what a fair deal is. Anschutz told The Times that his decision to pull AEG off the sales block actually makes it more likely a team will return, not less.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2013 | Marc Lifsher
Denver billionaire Philip Anschutz, who has pushed to bring a football stadium to Los Angeles, also wants to bring wind power to California. A plan being marketed in Sacramento would bring California utilities thousands of megawatts of electricity from a massive wind farm in Wyoming being developed by the entertainment and energy mogul, who also developed L.A. Live and Staples Center. The idea is being promoted by Wyoming state officials who say that, besides benefiting Anschutz, it could be an economic boost for the Cowboy State and an environmental plus for California, providing cleaner power at a good price.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2012 | By Roger Vincent, Los Angeles Times
Tim Leiweke stepped away from a meeting in his L.A. Live office last week to take a phone call. On the line was Sen. Darrell Steinberg (D-Sacramento), one of the most powerful men in the state capital, and he wanted some answers. "I'm not going anywhere," said Leiweke, the president and chief executive of Anschutz Entertainment Group, better know as AEG. He assured the Senate president pro tem, who has thrown his weight behind an effort to bring a National Football League team to Los Angeles, that AEG was committed to closing the deal.
BUSINESS
January 31, 2007
* Apple Inc. was ordered to pay more than $750,000 to lawyers who defended online journalists against the company's failed attempt to force them to reveal sources of confidential information used in news stories. * Manchester was picked as the site for Britain's first Las Vegas-style casino over favorites Blackpool and London's Millennium Dome, where billionaire Philip Anschutz has been hoping to locate one. * DirecTV Group Inc. agreed to buy Darlene Investments' 14.
SPORTS
February 2, 2008
Clippers owner Donald Sterling is admittedly not a genius when it comes to his team, but at least he makes himself available to reporters, attends games and seems to have a vested interest in the outcome. On the other hand, Kings owner Philip Anschutz hides behind a corporate wall of silence and gives the impression that he does not know or care about the team or its fans. I suspect Anschutz would not attend a game were it to take place in his Denver backyard. Elizabeth Watt Torrance
BUSINESS
September 19, 2012 | By Walter Hamilton and Roger Vincent, Los Angeles Times
The entertainment Goliath behind Staples Center and the Los Angeles Kings has been put up for sale, a move that could reshape the face of sports ownership in Southern California. The Anschutz Co., run by Denver billionaire Philip Anschutz, announced late Tuesday that it is seeking a buyer for its AEG subsidiary. The sprawling entity owns and manages a wide range of sports and entertainment properties, including the L.A. Live complex, the LA Galaxy professional soccer team, and a worldwide concert-promotion business.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2012 | By Kate Linthicum and Sam Farmer, Los Angeles Times
Billionaire developer Philip Anschutz is committed to the idea of an NFL stadium in downtown Los Angeles and is willing to buy a team himself in order to make the deal work, his top executive said Monday. Speaking to Times reporters and editors, Anschutz Entertainment Group President Tim Leiweke downplayed recent reports that NFL executives are dissatisfied with the terms of AEG's proposal for a team, as well as talk of possible competition from a Chavez Ravine football stadium now that ownership of the Dodgers has changed hands.
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