Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsPhilip Morris Companies Inc
IN THE NEWS

Philip Morris Companies Inc

BUSINESS
October 13, 1994 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Still grieving over their mother's death last year from lung cancer, the children of Della Koenigshofer are trying to put the hurt where they think it belongs--on the tobacco industry. In a novel attack on cigarette makers, seven members of the Koenigshofer family have taken the cigarette companies into small claims court in Los Angeles and Riverside to answer to wrongful death suits. With small claims damages capped at $5,000 a case, the Koenigshofers aren't seeking a big recovery.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
October 5, 2002 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles jury on Friday ordered tobacco giant Philip Morris Cos. to pay $28 billion in punitive damages to a 64-year-old woman with lung cancer. The judgment is the largest punitive award to an individual in U.S. history. Plaintiff Betty Bullock, a Newport Beach resident who also has liver cancer, contended that the firm failed to warn her about the hazards of smoking.
BUSINESS
April 28, 2000 | MYRON LEVIN and HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Cigarette makers Thursday threw cold water on an ambitious proposal by a federal judge in Brooklyn to craft a global settlement of major anti-tobacco suits, telling the judge in writing that they do not think talks would be fruitful and would invite a flood of opportunistic new claims. But some observers said U.S. District Judge Jack B.
BUSINESS
January 28, 1999 | From Bloomberg News
Philip Morris Cos., the world's largest tobacco company, said its profit rose 9% in the fourth quarter as the company's biggest promotions ever kept U.S. cigarette sales from falling even as it boosted prices. The maker of Marlboro cigarettes, Kraft foods and Miller beer said profit from operations rose to $1.77 billion, or 72 cents a share, matching estimates. Revenue rose 7% to $18.4 billion.
BUSINESS
August 7, 2001 | From Bloomberg News
The European Commission on Monday filed a new complaint against Philip Morris Cos. and R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Holdings Inc. for cigarette smuggling after a U.S. judge dismissed the case last month. U.S. District Judge Nicholas Garaufis ruled last month that the commission wasn't injured by alleged smuggling of cigarettes into the 15-nation European Union and didn't allow other EU members to sue.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2001 | Bloomberg News
A federal judge dismissed a suit brought by the European Commission against Philip Morris Cos. and R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Holdings Inc. that accused the two largest U.S. tobacco companies of smuggling cigarettes into the European Union. U.S. District Judge Nicholas Garaufis ruled the EC had not been injured and did not allow other EU countries to sue, according to a statement released by Philip Morris.
BUSINESS
July 28, 2001 | Bloomberg News
A federal judge rejected a U.S. Justice Department request to revive parts of its lawsuit against the tobacco industry, handing a victory to Philip Morris Cos. and other cigarette makers. In a pair of rulings, U.S. District Judge Gladys Kessler reaffirmed an earlier decision in which she threw out two of the three legal theories being pressed by the federal government in its multibillion-dollar case.
BUSINESS
September 5, 2001 | Bloomberg News
Philip Morris Cos. and other U.S. tobacco companies have won the dismissal of two lawsuits brought by Native American tribes seeking reimbursement for treatment of tobacco-related disease, the company said. In a ruling last week, U.S. District Judge Thad Heartfield in Beaumont, Texas, threw out a case brought by the Coushatta tribe, agreeing with the tobacco companies that the injury suffered by the tribe was too remote to warrant damages. The other ruling, on July 30, by U.S.
BUSINESS
May 11, 2001 | From Bloomberg News
A lawsuit seeking restitution from tobacco companies for every Californian who has bought cigarettes can proceed, a state judge ruled. Superior Court Judge Ronald Prager in San Diego has certified class-action claims on behalf of California smokers who contend that Philip Morris Cos. and other cigarette makers broke the state's unfair business practices laws. Smokers may be eligible for billions of dollars in restitution if the suit succeeds, plaintiffs' lawyers said.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|