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Philip Woldemariam

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NEWS
February 21, 1996 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Snoop Doggy Dogg, one of the nation's preeminent rap artists, was acquitted along with his bodyguard Tuesday of first- and second-degree murder charges in the shooting death of a gang member at a Palms park. Jurors also acquitted the 24-year-old rapper, whose real name is Calvin Broadus, and bodyguard McKinley Lee on one charge each of conspiracy to commit assault in connection with the August 1993 death of Philip Woldemariam.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1996 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rap star Snoop Doggy Dogg and his former bodyguard, who were acquitted of murder charges last month, will not be retried on lesser charges of voluntary manslaughter, the Los Angeles County district attorney's office announced Monday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1996 | From a Times staff writer
Jurors at the murder trial of rapper Snoop Doggy Dogg began deliberating his fate Friday after a prosecutor told the panel not to allow the defense to "demonize" the victim. Comparing victim Philip Woldemariam to the fictional character Bigger Thomas in the novel "Native Son," co-prosecutor Bobby Grace told the jury: "They are trying to portray Philip Woldemariam as an aggressive, wild person. Don't fall into that trap."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1996 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a Los Angeles Superior Court judge declared a mistrial Wednesday on charges of manslaughter against rapper Snoop Doggy Dogg and his bodyguard, newly released members of the jury sought autographs, prepared to attend a celebratory party with the defendants and--in one case--performed a rap song lampooning the prosecution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1996 | BILL BOYARSKY
The Woldemariams' life, once single-mindedly focused on pursuing the American dream, now centers on a small downtown courtroom where they seek justice for their slain son and brother, Philip. Philip Woldemariam, 20, was shot to death in a West Los Angeles park in 1993. A rich and famous rapper, Calvin Broadus (Snoop Doggy Dogg) and his bodyguard, McKinley Lee, are on trial for the murder.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1995
About 60 prospective panelists made it through the first phase of jury selection on Thursday in the murder trial of Snoop Doggy Dogg--one of America's best known rappers--and two co-defendants. "It is what we call a 'high-profile' case," Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Paul Flynn told nearly 100 potential panelists, some of whom groaned, as the morning began.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1996
The Los Angeles Superior Court jury in the Snoop Doggy Dogg murder trial, apparently struggling with a manslaughter charge, sent a note to the judge seeking guidance on their deliberations, it was learned Friday. It was unclear whether the jury had discarded the more serious charges of first- and second-degree murder against the rapper and his bodyguard, McKinley Lee.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1995
A state appeals court has denied a request to allow into evidence unedited taped statements made to police by two defendants in the Snoop Doggy Dogg murder trial, prompting prosecutors to consider the possibility of dropping charges--and then refiling them--against the rapper and a co-defendant. By dismissing and then refiling the charges against Snoop (a.k.a.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1995 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A key witness in the Snoop Doggy Dogg murder trial testified Monday that he and another man removed a gun from the waistband of their dying friend in an attempt to improve the chances that the rapper and his bodyguard would be convicted of murder. On the stand for the second day, Jason London said he figured that if his friend, Philip Woldemariam, was found unarmed, "Snoop and them would just go to jail." "If they never found a gun, it would be just considered murder," London told the jury.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1995 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The defense in the Snoop Doggy Dogg murder trial completed its opening statements Tuesday, portraying the rapper's bodyguard as a family man who was merely doing his job when he shot and killed a hotheaded gang member who was looking for a fight after seeing Snoop on his Westside turf. "That shooting is completely consistent with self-defense," defense lawyer Donald Re told the jury.
NEWS
February 21, 1996 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Snoop Doggy Dogg, one of the nation's preeminent rap artists, was acquitted along with his bodyguard Tuesday of first- and second-degree murder charges in the shooting death of a gang member at a Palms park. Jurors also acquitted the 24-year-old rapper, whose real name is Calvin Broadus, and bodyguard McKinley Lee on one charge each of conspiracy to commit assault in connection with the August 1993 death of Philip Woldemariam.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1996
The Los Angeles Superior Court jury in the Snoop Doggy Dogg murder trial, apparently struggling with a manslaughter charge, sent a note to the judge seeking guidance on their deliberations, it was learned Friday. It was unclear whether the jury had discarded the more serious charges of first- and second-degree murder against the rapper and his bodyguard, McKinley Lee.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1996 | BILL BOYARSKY
Race seemed to have no place in the Snoop Doggy Dogg murder trial, where the famed rapper and his armed bodyguard, both African Americans, were charged with killing a pistol-packing young black man. But during final arguments late last week, prosecutor Bobby Grace, who is African American, played a race card. He put an unusual face on it. But it was still the controversial card, played as swiftly and surely as Johnnie Cochran did during the O.J. Simpson trial.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1996
Jurors at the murder trial of rapper Snoop Doggy Dogg began deliberating his fate Friday after a prosecutor told the panel not to allow the defense to "demonize" the victim. Comparing victim Philip Woldemariam to the fictional character Bigger Thomas in the novel "Native Son," co-prosecutor Bobby Grace told the jury: "They are trying to portray Philip Woldemariam as an aggressive, wild person. Don't fall into that trap." The rapper, whose real name is Calvin Broadus, and former bodyguard McKinley Lee, 25, have been charged with murder in connection with the shooting death of Woldemariam at Woodbine Park on Aug. 25, 1993.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1996 | BILL BOYARSKY
The Woldemariams' life, once single-mindedly focused on pursuing the American dream, now centers on a small downtown courtroom where they seek justice for their slain son and brother, Philip. Philip Woldemariam, 20, was shot to death in a West Los Angeles park in 1993. A rich and famous rapper, Calvin Broadus (Snoop Doggy Dogg) and his bodyguard, McKinley Lee, are on trial for the murder.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1996 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A witness in the Snoop Doggy Dogg murder trial testified Wednesday that the victim appeared unarmed and was walking away from the rapper's Jeep when he was shot in a Palms park in August 1993. Trevor Wolfe told the jury that she did not see the victim, Philip Woldemariam, reach for his waistband and pull out a gun--contrary to a defense contention that the rapper's bodyguard shot Woldemariam in self-defense after Woldemariam displayed a weapon and possibly fired it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1996 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rap star Snoop Doggy Dogg and his former bodyguard, who were acquitted of murder charges last month, will not be retried on lesser charges of voluntary manslaughter, the Los Angeles County district attorney's office announced Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1995 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A key witness in the Snoop Doggy Dogg murder trial testified Monday that he and another man removed a gun from the waistband of their dying friend in an attempt to improve the chances that the rapper and his bodyguard would be convicted of murder. On the stand for the second day, Jason London said he figured that if his friend, Philip Woldemariam, was found unarmed, "Snoop and them would just go to jail." "If they never found a gun, it would be just considered murder," London told the jury.
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