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Philosophy

NEWS
April 18, 2000 | JENNIFER OLDHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nerissa Rosete fell in love with a pricey South Orange County home, especially its impressive view of the mountains. She entered escrow, putting $20,000 down. But she walked away from the deal, losing half her down payment, after a consultant noted the way the backyard steeply dropped off to meet Interstate 5. It was, he warned her, bad feng shui: The receding yard would prompt energy to rush out of the home.
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SPORTS
March 1, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
The precept was simple enough: buy soccer teams on both sides of the border, give them the same name and similar uniforms, and manage them with the same philosophy, creating a synergy that would benefit both clubs. But it hasn't worked out that way for Mexican businessman Jorge Vergara, owner of Chivas de Guadalajara of the Mexico League and a co-founder of Major League Soccer's Chivas USA. So with his U.S. team stumbling toward its third consecutive losing season last summer, Vergara and his wife bought out their partners and decided to start over.
WORLD
February 12, 2010 | By Devorah Lauter
A self-inflicted case of Botulism has claimed a prominent victim: the debonair, silver-coiffed French philosopher Bernard-Henri Levy. Known here simply as BHL, Levy is a veritable rock star of philosophy in a nation where the covers of weekly glossies have posed leading thinkers in superhero, v-line formation, looking as if they are ready to attack or to take flight. Levy usually leads this pack in terms of media attention, in part for his controversial political views and in part for his looks.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
The very best piece of writing I've encountered on Twitter comes from a feed called NeinQuarterly . Here it is: “At Starbucks I order under the name Godot. Then leave.” That's an almost perfect use of Twitter as a platform: Aphoristic, and yet hinting at a depth of knowledge underneath. It's a joke, but one you have to know something to get. The same is true of much of what appears at NeinQuarterly, which bills itself as a “Compendium of Utopian Negation,” but is really more a labor of love.
SPORTS
October 15, 1988
Obviously, Jim Wahler isn't majoring in philosophy. RON FOWLER Newbury Park
OPINION
November 3, 1991
At UCLA on Oct. 25, Czechoslovakian President Vaclav Havel delivered the Tanner Lecture on Human Values. It was not a humane message. Rather than extol economic freedom, productivity and private property, as he did elsewhere on his U.S. visit, Havel advocated a philosophy geared to destroy those very values: environmentalism. What particular values did Havel advocate? Not self-interest or the use of one's mind to solve problems. These values he incredibly ascribed to Marxism, a philosophy which created communist Czechoslovakia, where individuals sacrificed to the collective.
NEWS
March 17, 1990 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Government researchers have for the first time proved a scientific principle that, in the arcane and often bizarre world of quantum physics, is equivalent to demonstrating that a watched pot never boils. In proving what is known as the quantum Zeno effect, named after the Greek philosopher, the physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder, Colo.
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