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ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2009 | Jeff Weiss
Besides the Rolling Stones, U2 and Bruce Springsteen, it's hard to think of many rock acts that could crowd the Empire Polo Club in Indio for a three-day festival featuring no supporting acts or other live entertainment. But the legendary Vermont jam titan Phish has long operated outside the realm of normalcy, with a rabid fan base closer to addicted acolytes than casual admirers. When long-gestating message board rumors were finally confirmed months ago, Phish fanatics instantly began making preparations to trek to the site of the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival, where the band held its eighth festival -- the first in five years.
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BUSINESS
November 6, 2013 | By David Lazarus
A recent email informed Jane that she'd won a pile of money. How nice. Jane isn't stupid -- she knows she almost certainly hasn't won anything. But she wants to know if there's an easy way to tell if an email is legit. First of all, she and everyone else can dismiss all those emails saying you've won the lottery or are needed to help move a huge amount of money from an African bank account. Those are bogus. ASK LAZ: Smart answers to consumer questions Phishing emails can be tougher to spot.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1998 | MARC WEINGARTEN
The lost children of the Dead Head diaspora came from far and wide to see their new folk heroes Phish at the Greek Theatre on Thursday. And the Vermont-based quartet in turn demonstrated why it has become the master jam band of the post-Grateful Dead era, turning in a performance that alternated technical rigor with feathery delicacy. It's too easy to dismiss Phish as a Grateful Dead facsimile.
BUSINESS
August 27, 2013 | By Paresh Dave, This story has been updated. See the note below for details.
Melbourne IT, an Australian firm that allows website owners to buy addresses such as latimes.com, said the downtime suffered by the New York Times website Tuesday began when hackers gained access to the user name and password of one of the company's sales partners. Using those reseller's credentials, hackers changed the records that tell computers around the world from where to download web pages when someone types NYTimes.com into an Internet browser. [Updated, 8:27 a.m. Aug. 28: The U.S.-based sales partner's credentials ended up in the hackers' hands after a targeted phishing attack was directed at the firm's staff, Melbourne IT Chief Technology Officer Bruce Tonkin said early Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2008 | Randy Lewis
Grab your tackle box: Phish is back. The Vermont-based jam band, which became one of the top draws in the concert business during the 1990s and early part of this decade, will reunite for shows March 6 to 8 in Hampton, Va., and is expected to announce additional performances for 2009. When the group called it quits in 2004, guitarist Trey Anastasio said his thinking was that "Phish has run its course and that we should end it now while it's still on a high note." The band's final shows Aug. 14 and 15, 2004, in Coventry, Vt., drew about 80,000 fans and movie theaters around the country carried some of the performances.
BUSINESS
November 6, 2013 | By David Lazarus
A recent email informed Jane that she'd won a pile of money. How nice. Jane isn't stupid -- she knows she almost certainly hasn't won anything. But she wants to know if there's an easy way to tell if an email is legit. First of all, she and everyone else can dismiss all those emails saying you've won the lottery or are needed to help move a huge amount of money from an African bank account. Those are bogus. ASK LAZ: Smart answers to consumer questions Phishing emails can be tougher to spot.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1993 | RICHARD CROMELIN
Remember fusion? It's back. Phish, an egghead rock quartet from Vermont that has tapped into American youth's resurgent hippie vibe, headlined the first of two shows at the Palace on Wednesday and jammed the night away. The band induced impressionistic dancing to undanceable jazzy shuffles, and no doubt blew a few altered minds with their tight and technically resourceful interplay.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2009 | Associated Press
Tourism officials in Virginia say Phish heads brought their appetites and wallets -- not just dope -- to the jamband's reunion last weekend. The Hampton Convention & Visitors Bureau reported Tuesday that the estimated 75,000 fans who flocked to the coastal city generated $5 million in hotel, restaurant and retail sales. A manager at Hooters said the restaurant sold a week's worth of wings and beer over three days. Monday, police said they seized $1.2 million worth of drugs during the encampment of Phish fans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 2013 | By Mikael Wood
A decade or so ago, Nathan Rabin's older sister went to Israel on a trip with a youth group. At the time she was a fan of thoughtful folk musicians like Indigo Girls and Dar Williams, but her roommate there listened to Celine Dion - and only Celine Dion. "The first four months were really agonizing for my sister," Rabin said. "But then she cracked. She went from 'I hate Celine Dion' to 'Celine Dion is my favorite artist of all time.'" A former writer for the Onion newspaper's A.V. Club and author of several books, including "The Big Rewind: A Memoir Brought to You by Pop Culture," Rabin undergoes a startlingly similar transition in his new book, "You Don't Know Me but You Don't Like Me: Phish, Insane Clown Posse, and My Misadventures with Two of Music's Most Maligned Tribes" (Scribner: 272 pp., $16 paper)
NEWS
July 31, 2009
Phish: The headline on a Quick Takes item in Saturday's Calendar section said the band Phish had set eight dates to play in Indio. The band will play eight sets at the Empire Polo Grounds over a three-day period beginning Oct. 30, but it's being sold as a single event.
BUSINESS
July 26, 2013 | By Paresh Dave
Asked in a survey to distinguish malicious emails from legitimate ones, nearly everyone in a group of 53 undergraduates failed. The results from a new study by researchers at North Carolina State University found most people are overconfident in their ability to spot phishing attacks directed at them. “Everyone's susceptible,” said psychology professor Christopher Mayhorn , one of the study's authors. “But there's relationships that make some people more susceptible.” PHOTOS: Top smartphones of 2013 Before taking the test, 89% of the group had said they were “confident" in their ability to tell the difference between an authentic email and one sent by a scammer.
BUSINESS
July 25, 2013 | By Paresh Dave
At least 2 million people received the email May 16 notifying them that an order they had just made on "Wallmart's" website was being processed, though none of them had done any such thing. Still, thousands of people clicked on the link in the email, taking many of them to a harmless Google search results page for "Walmart. " Others weren't so fortunate. The link led to the invisible download of malware that covertly infected their personal computers, turning them into remotely controlled robots for hackers, according to email security firm Proofpoint Inc. These sorts of "phishing" attacks are not only becoming more common but also are getting more lethal, with fake emails becoming harder to distinguish from real ones.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 2013 | By Mikael Wood
A decade or so ago, Nathan Rabin's older sister went to Israel on a trip with a youth group. At the time she was a fan of thoughtful folk musicians like Indigo Girls and Dar Williams, but her roommate there listened to Celine Dion - and only Celine Dion. "The first four months were really agonizing for my sister," Rabin said. "But then she cracked. She went from 'I hate Celine Dion' to 'Celine Dion is my favorite artist of all time.'" A former writer for the Onion newspaper's A.V. Club and author of several books, including "The Big Rewind: A Memoir Brought to You by Pop Culture," Rabin undergoes a startlingly similar transition in his new book, "You Don't Know Me but You Don't Like Me: Phish, Insane Clown Posse, and My Misadventures with Two of Music's Most Maligned Tribes" (Scribner: 272 pp., $16 paper)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2013
SPORTS The Boys in the Boat Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics Daniel James Brown Viking, $28.95 An underdog story of nine working-class boys from the University of Washington's eight-oar crew and their determination to win an Olympic gold medal racing against elite teams from England and Nazi Germany. (June) Doc A Memoir Dwight Gooden and Ellis Henican New Harvest, $27 The former NY Mets pitcher had a Cy Young Award and a World Series crown and the adoration of fans, only to throw it all away on drugs and alcohol; he details his struggles to get sober and his relationships with family and fellow players.
BUSINESS
June 8, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
LinkedIn Corp. said it was not aware of any user accounts being compromised as a result of an attack by a hacker who obtained 8 million passwords and posted them online. The professional social networking website said Thursday that it had not received "verified reports of unauthorized access" to its users' accounts since the breach earlier this week. But that didn't address users coming under attack from phishing scams that are using the incident to steal log-in names and passwords.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2012 | By Chris Barton
Perhaps proving that time and tastes may change, but dreams of a free car are forever, the musical "Hands on a Hardbody" will make the leap from the West Coast to Broadway for the 2012-13 season. The La Jolla Playhouse production, which is based on S.R. Bindler and Kevin Morris' 1997 documentary of the same name, opened on May 12. It features a book by Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Doug Wright of "I Am My Own Wife. " The musical is directed by Neil Pepe, who also directed "Speed-the-Plow" on Broadway in 2008, and in an additional bit of crossover appeal, features genre-hopping music by Phish guitarist Trey Anastacio and "Bring It On: The Musical's" Amanda Green.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2005 | Steve Appleford
Trey Anastasio "Shine" (Columbia) * * * ANASTASIO was wise to let it all go. Phish was everything, the meaning of life itself to a dedicated caravan of cultists, an endless jam session of sunshine and formless noodling, and profoundly uninteresting to most everyone else. By dissolving Phish last year, to the great horror of true believers, Anastasio finally set himself free. It shows on "Shine," his first album (in stores Tuesday) since that breakup.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2000
Phish frontman Trey Anastacio makes a guest appearance on the upcoming album from blues veteran Son Seals on a new version of the latter's old "Funky Bitch." The album, "Letting Go," is due from Telarc on April 25, with Seals set to be the opening act on some Phish concerts. . . . What did Britney Spears do for her 18th birthday last month?
BUSINESS
January 31, 2012 | By Andrea Chang, Los Angeles Times
Major tech firms including Google Inc., Facebook Inc. and Microsoft Corp. have teamed up to fight email phishing scams. Members say the partnership will lead to better email security and protect users and tech brands from fraudulent messages. The group, which calls itself DMARC — for Domain-based Message Authentication, Reporting & Conformance — says it wants to help reduce email abuse by standardizing how email receivers perform authentication. Now email senders will get consistent authentication results for their messages at Gmail, Hotmail, AOL and any other email receiver using DMARC.
BUSINESS
November 22, 2010 | By Stuart Pfeifer, Los Angeles Times
Ab Force ? The Federal Trade Commission will mail refunds to more than 34,000 buyers of Ab Force electronic simulation devices, which had been advertised as being able to help people lose weight without exercising. Marketers including Telebrands Corp. and TV Savings violated federal law by making false claims about the product's effectiveness, the FTC said in a news release. Phishing ? The FBI's New York office is warning the public to be careful about responding to e-mails purportedly from their banks.
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