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Phoebe Snow

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April 6, 2007 | Randy Lewis
Valerie Rose Laub, the daughter for whom pop-jazz singer Phoebe Snow put her career on hold, has died. She was 31. A statement issued Thursday by a family spokesman said only that she had died suddenly on March 19. Snow interrupted a promising career after charting the pop hit "Poetry Man" in 1975, the year Valerie was born with severe brain damage, because Snow didn't want to institutionalize her daughter. They had lived in recent years in Fort Lee, N.J. -- Randy Lewis
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2007 | Randy Lewis
Valerie Rose Laub, the daughter for whom pop-jazz singer Phoebe Snow put her career on hold, has died. She was 31. A statement issued Thursday by a family spokesman said only that she had died suddenly on March 19. Snow interrupted a promising career after charting the pop hit "Poetry Man" in 1975, the year Valerie was born with severe brain damage, because Snow didn't want to institutionalize her daughter. They had lived in recent years in Fort Lee, N.J. -- Randy Lewis
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1989 | DON HECKMAN
With a generation of pop musicians well into their second and third decades of dealing with the hazards of high public visibility, it's no surprise that images of personal redemption and recovery are rapidly catching up with love stories as sources of inspiration. Survival and renewal seem to have become the buzzwords of the late '80s. Take singer Phoebe Snow, who opens a three-night engagement at the Coach House in San Juan Capistrano tonight.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1998 | JON D. MATSUMOTO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
From Paul McCartney to Sting, pop music is rife with artists whose material has grown more sedate as they've gotten older. In the case of Phoebe Snow, the process has reversed. Known mainly as a wintry pop-folk-jazz chanteuse during her 1970s heyday, the 46-year-old vocalist has reemerged in the '90s as a red-hot blues-and-rock-belting mama.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1998 | By John Roos, Special to The Times
She had one of the more memorable voices of the early 1970s. But Phoebe Snow, the pop-jazz singer-songwriter whose single "Poetry Man" climbed into the Top 5 in 1974, virtually disappeared from the scene during the 1980s and much of the '90s. Her latest release, "I Can't Complain," is her first album since 1989's "Something Real. " Snow, who took time out for family concerns, hasn't been completely static. In 1992, she toured with Donald Fagen, Michael McDonald and Boz Scaggs in the "New York Rock 'n' Soul Revue" tour.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1989 | Mike Boehm
The nice thing about Phoebe Snow's recent comeback album, "Something Real," is that it freed her to do some classic soul-belting in the Aretha Franklin vein, without sacrificing the communicative possibilities of her mid-'70s incarnation as a sensitive, introspective balladeer.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1989 | CHRIS WILLMAN
"Isn't she dead?" asked a friend upon learning of the long-absent Phoebe Snow's return to town Monday night. Ah, the perils of the comeback trail. The Snow show was not booked into Forest Lawn but rather the Roxy, a dead giveaway that the songstress is indeed still among the living. Not that it's been easy to tell during the last eight years. The recorded output of this unlikely but unforgettable star, who had her first and biggest hit 15 years ago with "Poetry Man," has been limited during most of the '80s to one vocal track on a Dave Grusin LP and anonymous advertising jingle work.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1998 | ELYSA GARDNER
On her first solo album in nine years, Snow covers classic songs by Bob Dylan, Joni Mitchell, Van Morrison and others. None of these renditions are exactly revelatory, but Snow's tangy, warmly virtuosic voice and accessible blues-pop arrangements provide guilt-free easy listening.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1996 | JON MATSUMOTO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Phoebe Snow is best known for the confessional, angst-ridden ballads she produced in her 1970s heyday. One of those wintry songs, the gorgeous and poignant "Poetry Man," became a Top 5 hit in 1975. So when the New Jersey-based singer delivered a show last Friday night in San Francisco that contained a number of up-tempo rock 'n' roll numbers, some of her longtime fans were taken aback.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1998 | JON D. MATSUMOTO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
From Paul McCartney to Sting, pop music is rife with artists whose material has grown more sedate as they've gotten older. In the case of Phoebe Snow, the process has reversed. Known mainly as a wintry pop-folk-jazz chanteuse during her 1970s heyday, the 46-year-old vocalist has reemerged in the '90s as a red-hot blues-and-rock-belting mama.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1998 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
She had one of the more memorable voices of the early 1970s. But Phoebe Snow, the pop-jazz singer-songwriter whose single "Poetry Man" climbed into the Top 5 in 1974, virtually disappeared from the scene during the 1980s and much of the '90s. Her latest release, "I Can't Complain," is her first album since 1989's "Something Real." Snow, who took time out for family concerns, hasn't been completely static.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1998 | ELYSA GARDNER
On her first solo album in nine years, Snow covers classic songs by Bob Dylan, Joni Mitchell, Van Morrison and others. None of these renditions are exactly revelatory, but Snow's tangy, warmly virtuosic voice and accessible blues-pop arrangements provide guilt-free easy listening.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1996 | JON MATSUMOTO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Phoebe Snow is best known for the confessional, angst-ridden ballads she produced in her 1970s heyday. One of those wintry songs, the gorgeous and poignant "Poetry Man," became a Top 5 hit in 1975. So when the New Jersey-based singer delivered a show last Friday night in San Francisco that contained a number of up-tempo rock 'n' roll numbers, some of her longtime fans were taken aback.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1989 | Mike Boehm
The nice thing about Phoebe Snow's recent comeback album, "Something Real," is that it freed her to do some classic soul-belting in the Aretha Franklin vein, without sacrificing the communicative possibilities of her mid-'70s incarnation as a sensitive, introspective balladeer.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1989 | DON HECKMAN
With a generation of pop musicians well into their second and third decades of dealing with the hazards of high public visibility, it's no surprise that images of personal redemption and recovery are rapidly catching up with love stories as sources of inspiration. Survival and renewal seem to have become the buzzwords of the late '80s. Take singer Phoebe Snow, who opens a three-night engagement at the Coach House in San Juan Capistrano tonight.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1989 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Top Adult Contemporary Singles 1."Miss You Like Crazy," Natalie Cole 2."Everlasting Love," Howard Jones 3."Through the Storm," Aretha Franklin, Elton John 4."Second Chance," Thirty Eight Special 5."After All," Cher, Peter Cetera 6."Thinking of You," Sa-Fire 7."Wind Beneath My Wings," Bette Midler 8."Promises," Basia 9."The Best Years of Our Lives," Neil Diamond 10."Talk It Over," Grayson Hugh 11."Giving Up on Love," Rick Astley 12."Cry," Waterfront 13."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1989 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Top Adult Contemporary Singles 1."Miss You Like Crazy," Natalie Cole 2."Everlasting Love," Howard Jones 3."Through the Storm," Aretha Franklin, Elton John 4."Second Chance," Thirty Eight Special 5."After All," Cher, Peter Cetera 6."Thinking of You," Sa-Fire 7."Wind Beneath My Wings," Bette Midler 8."Promises," Basia 9."The Best Years of Our Lives," Neil Diamond 10."Talk It Over," Grayson Hugh 11."Giving Up on Love," Rick Astley 12."Cry," Waterfront 13."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1989 | CHRIS WILLMAN
"Isn't she dead?" asked a friend upon learning of the long-absent Phoebe Snow's return to town Monday night. Ah, the perils of the comeback trail. The Snow show was not booked into Forest Lawn but rather the Roxy, a dead giveaway that the songstress is indeed still among the living. Not that it's been easy to tell during the last eight years. The recorded output of this unlikely but unforgettable star, who had her first and biggest hit 15 years ago with "Poetry Man," has been limited during most of the '80s to one vocal track on a Dave Grusin LP and anonymous advertising jingle work.
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