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ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2013 | By Leah Ollman
Kelly Barrie's show at Marine Contemporary starts in the parking lot with a 10-foot fiberglass skate ramp, a steep comma that mimics the curve and rise of a swimming pool. Barrie built the portable ramp (which appears to be getting some use) as a homage to a humble icon of skate culture from the late '70s. His re-creation evokes a cultural moment but not much more, and the studies for it are only tangentially interesting. The show lifts off thanks to a second group of images based on another functional/sculptural form attractive to skaters: the huge concrete pipes of the Central Arizona Project, a massive water-delivery system.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2012 | By Leah Ollman
Chris McCaw's stunning photographs start with a small act of defiance: shooting directly into the sun, a basic no-no. Other deviations follow, but the work never strays from its grounding in awe and reverence. The pictures pay homage to photography's essential nature as a record written by light, and they chronicle, with profound beauty and elemental simplicity, what it means to occupy a specific place on earth at a specific time.  McCaw's third show at Duncan Miller extends the "Sunburn" series he launched, by accident, nearly a decade ago when an overnight exposure burned a hole through his negative.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2014 | By Leah Ollman
Ron Jude's "Lick Creek Line" is an essay in the less common sense of the term: an attempt, or effort. It doesn't build an argument or deliver much in the way of information to do so, but instead issues impressions, propositions toward a loose understanding of its ostensible subject, a fur-trapper in rural Idaho. The constellations of color photographs accumulate a kind of emotional heft, though more so in book form, as originally conceived, than on the wall, as at Gallery Luisotti, where the project is too abbreviated to grab hold.
NEWS
September 26, 2012 | By Christopher Reynolds
Macduff Everton is a Santa Barbara-based photographer with a wide reputation for wide pictures - often-staggering landscapes he creates using a panoramic camera in locations from Patagonia to Paris. (In fact, an exhibition of his Patagonia images will hang through Oct. 27 at the PYO Gallery LA in downtown Los Angeles.) But Everton's latest project is different. It's a set of intimate black-and-white images of Maya people on Mexico's Yucatán Peninsula. It's called “ The Modern Maya : Incidents of Travel and Friendship in Yucatán” (University of Texas Press, 2012)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2013 | By Leah Ollman
Digital technology has largely dematerialized photography for the general public. Pictures are now shown and exchanged more on screen than hand-to-hand. The work of a growing number of artists counters this trend and re materializes the medium, emphasizing the photograph's identity not just as an image carrier, a vehicle, but as an object. Artists in the late '60s, responding to a different set of stimuli, were among the first to actively exploit the sculptural possibilities of photography (Cherry and Martin held a great show on this subject last year)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2012 | By Leah Ollman
"Ideally," Lewis Baltz wrote in commentary accompanying the early publication of some of his 1978-79 pictures of Park City, Utah, "the photographer should be invisible and the medium transparent. " That aspiration was common enough among New Topographics photographers in the '70s, but also slyly disingenuous. If those framing the shots and pressing the shutters were truly invisible, a picture by Baltz wouldn't be instantly recognizable, nor distinguishable from one by Robert Adams or Joe Deal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1997
Santa Monica College will inaugurate a show on the Holocaust Sept. 8 with a display of about 40 photographs by Alfred Benjamin. Benjamin, 81, of Santa Monica, was nearly killed for photographing the Nazi destruction of a Jewish synagogue in Hamburg. "I was interrogated by the Gestapo and told to get out of Germany within 24 hours. I left 16 hours later," he said. He moved to England and then to Santa Monica, where he teaches photography. The show, which runs through Oct.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1991 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No charges will be filed against Laguna Beach photographer Marilyn Lennon over photographs she took of a partially nude 12-year-old girl at a professional workshop in Santa Fe, N.M. "There's not going to be a criminal prosecution," said Caroline Bass, an assistant district attorney in Santa Fe. Bass said she made the determination after reviewing a file prepared by investigators with the Santa Fe Police Department.
BUSINESS
February 17, 1997 | GALI KRONENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Gali Kronenberg is a freelance writer based in Los Angeles
Spread across Joe Nolte's desk are photos of scenes that never took place. An old man in South America (long dead) stands next to a grandson he's never met. In another photo, a Los Angeles woman (not an actress) in a negligee sits in Scarlett O'Hara's bed from "Gone With the Wind" and stares into Clark Gable's eyes. A third photo depicts an old man in a bomber jacket hugging a younger man (actually the old man, 50 years earlier).
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