Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsPhotos
IN THE NEWS

Photos

NEWS
March 6, 2014 | By Kerry Cavanaugh
Doh! Imagine Assemblywoman Bonnie Lowenthal's surprise when she received one of her own campaign mailers only to discover the photo on it was not her longtime home of Long Beach, where she wants to be mayor, but a picture of San Diego. The giveaway was the skyline, which was obviously different, and the giant Navy vessel docked in the harbor. Lowenthal told Times reporter Christine Mai-Duc that she had approved a nighttime photo of the Long Beach skyline for the brochure and was "shocked" when she received the piece in the mail.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Sheri Linden
The subject of "Thomas Keating: A Rising Tide of Silence" is a Trappist monk and a prolific author who's considered a transformative figure in contemporary Christianity. In the 1970s, Keating became a key figure in the revival of contemplative prayer, reshaping an ancient monastic tradition for modern-day seekers. Filmmakers Elena Mannes and Peter C. Jones are attentive to the beauty and discipline of meditative devotion, and their portrait will be of special interest to followers for its intimate conversations with the monk, who turned 91 on March 7. Jones, Keating's nephew, has a background in art photography, evident in the creative use of composite stills.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Robert Abele
In "The Face of Love," it's five years after the devastating loss of her husband when Annette Bening's still-grieving Nikki sees an uncanny look-alike of her dear departed wandering their old haunt, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. As Nikki starts courting Tom (Ed Harris), a local artist with no idea the psychodrama he's walking into, moviegoers can be forgiven for seeing double themselves in the trappings of this skewed, late-in-life romance. But rather than indulging the weird Sirkian "Vertigo" (minus the murder plot)
NEWS
March 6, 2014 | By Paul Whitefield, This post has been updated. See below for details.
OK, listen up, all you dumb users of smartphones: In spite of what Massachusetts ' high court decided, no, it isn't OK to take “upskirt” pictures of unsuspecting women. On Wednesday, in the land of the Puritans and the home of “Banned in Boston,” all hell broke loose after the state Supreme Judicial Court overruled a lower court in a case involving one Michael Robertson, who seemed to think it was clever to use his cellphone in ways Apple or Samsung never intended. But Robertson got away with it because the state's Peeping Tom laws don't apply to such behavior, the court found.
NATIONAL
March 6, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
Massachusetts lawmakers Thursday approved legislation making it a crime to take secret photos of private body parts, a quick response to a state supreme court ruling that dismissed charges against a man who took “upskirt” photos of female trolley passengers.  Under the new law, anyone who attempts to take such photos without consent would face a maximum penalty of more than two years in jail and a $5,000 fine, the Associated Press reported....
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Gary Goldstein
"Lucky Bastard" is a bold little thriller - and deft cautionary tale - involving a website (called Lucky Bastard) that awards average Joes the chance to have sex with a porn star. The caveat: These trysts will be filmed for the site's subscribers, so the more awkward or humiliating the contestant's experience, the better - at least for the viewer. At the core of this particular circus is the website's tough but equitable impresario, Mike (a terrific Don McManus), who oversees a mini-stable of talent including performers Ashley (Betsy Rue)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
It was the gaffe that launched a thousand quips. John Travolta's now-infamous mispronunciation of "Let It Go" singer Idina Menzel's name as "Adele Dazeem" at the Oscars spawned viral screen captures, countless tweets and even a widget to "Travoltify your name. " On Wednesday, Movies Now asked readers to submit their own witty captions about the incident to accompany the photo above, which shows Travolta backstage with publicist Paul Bloch. Here are our favorite submissions. Third place: "Now, John, it's I before E except after C, and remember the L in Idina Menzel," suggested by James Norwood.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Philip Brandes
“Every great artist has freed himself from something - his family, his nation, his race,” warns the worldly mentor to an aspiring painter in Chaim Potok's semi-autobiographical novel, “My Name Is Asher Lev.” As the Fountain Theatre's affecting L.A. premiere of Aaron Posner's three-actor stage adaptation eloquently illustrates, the greater the artist, the more painful sacrifices that separation entails. Posner's script skillfully retains the book's introspective narrative voice, philosophical insights and essential plot points, as its title character (played with convincing passion by Jason Karasev)
NATIONAL
March 6, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
The top court of Massachusetts, founded in the 17th century by Puritans, has ruled in the 21st century that state law does not protect a woman's privacy from a man with a cellphone who wants to snap an "upskirt" photo of her as she rides on a Boston trolley. Michael Robertson was arrested in August 2010 by transit police who set up a sting after getting reports that he was using his cellphone to take photos and video up female riders' skirts and dresses, a process known as “upskirting.” On Wednesday, the Supreme Judicial Court overruled a lower court and dismissed the charges.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Inkoo Kang
Urbanites have plenty of reasons to fear country folk, at least in the movies. Getting away for the weekend so often turn into a showdown with masked murderers that heading out to the country seems like a game of Russian roulette. In writer-director Jeremy Lovering's exceptional British thriller "In Fear," the needy, nebbish Tom (Iain De Caestecker) rolls the dice by booking a room at a remote hotel for himself and his maybe-kinda girlfriend, Lucy (Alice Englert), to celebrate their two-week anniversary.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|