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Photovoltaic Cells

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BUSINESS
April 2, 1985 | By JAMES QUINN, Times Staff Writer
When J. W. (Bill) Yerkes resigned abruptly from Arco Solar Inc. in January to start his own company using a new solar technology, the fledgling photovoltaic industry buzzed like an aging transformer. Yerkes, 51, was already widely known as an individualist who had combined the presidency of the Chatsworth-based photovoltaic company, a subsidiary of oil giant Atlantic Richfield Co., with a life style faintly reminiscent of the 1960s counterculture.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2014 | By Julie Cart
IVANPAH VALLEY, Calif. - The day begins early at the Ivanpah solar power plant. Long before the sun rises, computers aim five square miles of mirrors to reflect the first rays of dawn onto one of three 40-story towers rising above the desert floor. The 356,000 mirrors, each the size of a garage door, focus so much light on the towers that they pulsate with a blinding white light. At the top of each tower is an enormous boiler where the sun's energy heats water to more than 1,000 degrees, creating steam that spins electricity-generating turbines.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1991 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Electric sandpaper" is what one of its inventors calls it. And it may be an answer to the long-sought goal of producing solar power at a realistic cost to the consumer. The inexpensive, fabric-like photovoltaic material shown off recently by Southern California Edison Co. and Texas Instruments Inc. is a promising surprise from an unexpected line of research.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2013 | Catherine Green
Atop a beige apartment complex in North Hollywood, rows of solar panels began providing energy Wednesday as part of what backers say is the nation's largest urban rooftop solar program. Called Clean L.A. Solar, the program allows the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power to pay customers to generate solar power across the city's vast expanse of flat roof space. The goal of the effort, the brainchild of the Los Angeles Business Council, is to generate 150 megawatts of solar electricity, or enough to power about 30,000 homes.
NEWS
December 25, 1994 | DALIA BALIGH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The flat blue-and-white panels atop the sand-colored Bedouin houses look totally alien in the stark landscape of this tiny desert village. But they have catapulted its inhabitants into the 20th Century. The tribal life, little changed for centuries, has been given a jolt--solar energy technology has brought electricity for the first time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 2001 | MATT SURMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a Seabee base dominated by squat yellow buildings out of the 1960s sits one with white-sloped roofs, a recycled water system, and photovoltaic cells that seems right for the present. As Southern California hurtles into a summer of energy woes, this unique building at the Port Hueneme naval base is getting the attention its makers had always hoped it would receive.
HOME & GARDEN
October 16, 1993 | CONNIE KOENENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ivan Forbes first thought about energy self-sufficiency while having to wait in line for gasoline during the Arab oil embargo of 1973. "I thought there should be something that ordinary people could do to help themselves," he said. "I didn't like being dependent on somebody." He and his wife, Elke, determined that there were several forms of alternative energy they could adapt to the three-level Sylmar home they had built in 1964. First, they installed a solar panel system.
BUSINESS
March 27, 2008 | Andrea Chang, Times Staff Writer
Solar energy is getting a big boost in Southern California with the unveiling of two projects that will be capable of generating a total of 500 megawatts of electricity, enough to serve more than 300,000 homes. Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and Southern California Edison plan to announce today the country's largest rooftop solar installation project ever proposed by a utility company. And on Wednesday, FPL Energy, the largest operator of solar power in the U.S.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1991 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The solar carport today joins a profusion of vehicles, furniture finishes and barbecue lighters being dreamed up as part of the grand campaign for cleaner air in Southern California. The device--which will use rooftop photovoltaic solar panels to recharge cars or to feed excess electricity into a utility's power lines--will be announced this morning by Southern California Edison and the South Coast Air Quality Management District.
BUSINESS
March 30, 1993 | JACK SEARLES
Camarillo-based Siemens Solar Industries, whose parent recently filed a lawsuit alleging that it was a victim of fraud in purchasing the solar energy concern, has installed an automated manufacturing system aimed at increasing efficiency in the production of solar cells.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2009 | William Nottingham
Should the city of Los Angeles become a national leader in the generation of renewable solar energy, as a March 3 ballot measure proposes? Or would it be too costly to put 400 megawatts' worth of photovoltaic cells on roofs and parking lots across town? Times editors recently asked the 10 mayoral candidates about the solar energy charter amendment, Measure B. Here are excerpts of their responses. Do you support Measure B, the city's proposed solar power initiative? Why?
BUSINESS
March 27, 2008 | Andrea Chang, Times Staff Writer
Solar energy is getting a big boost in Southern California with the unveiling of two projects that will be capable of generating a total of 500 megawatts of electricity, enough to serve more than 300,000 homes. Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and Southern California Edison plan to announce today the country's largest rooftop solar installation project ever proposed by a utility company. And on Wednesday, FPL Energy, the largest operator of solar power in the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 2001 | MATT SURMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a Seabee base dominated by squat yellow buildings out of the 1960s sits one with white-sloped roofs, a recycled water system, and photovoltaic cells that seems right for the present. As Southern California hurtles into a summer of energy woes, this unique building at the Port Hueneme naval base is getting the attention its makers had always hoped it would receive.
BUSINESS
May 28, 1997 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As recently as last fall, the photovoltaic energy industry was in danger of being snuffed out by the hostile winds of electricity deregulation blowing into California's power market. Why the gloom? Photovoltaic, a form of solar power, is more than twice as expensive to produce as power generated with natural gas, the benchmark.
BUSINESS
December 19, 1995 | JACK SEARLES
Once again, solar panels produced by Camarillo-based Siemens Solar Industries are generating some of the electricity that lights the national Christmas tree. As it did last year, Siemens has joined other U.S. solar manufacturers in providing panels for the traditional Washington holiday spectacle. The panels gather the sun's power during the day, then deliver it at night to the National Park Service.
NEWS
December 25, 1994 | DALIA BALIGH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The flat blue-and-white panels atop the sand-colored Bedouin houses look totally alien in the stark landscape of this tiny desert village. But they have catapulted its inhabitants into the 20th Century. The tribal life, little changed for centuries, has been given a jolt--solar energy technology has brought electricity for the first time.
BUSINESS
June 2, 1992 | JACK SEARLES
Officials of Siemens Solar Industries in Camarillo are attending this month's Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro with a goal of expanding the company's market for solar energy-related business in developing countries. "The potential is huge," said William Howley, Siemens Solar's chief of staff. "There are 2 billion people in the world who have no access to electricity. In many cases, solar energy is the answer to the problem." Howley is in Rio along with Siemens Solar's president, Charles F. Gay.
BUSINESS
March 2, 1992 | ROBERT MORAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
High above Earth, more and more satellites are being powered by gallium arsenide solar cells--cells that are lighter, longer-lasting and more efficient than any made from silicon, the industry standard. Ninety-nine percent of the market for gallium arsenide solar cells belongs to Applied Solar Energy Corp., a solar and optical technologies firm based in the City of Industry, which has placed its business future behind the compound semiconductor material.
HOME & GARDEN
October 16, 1993 | CONNIE KOENENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ivan Forbes first thought about energy self-sufficiency while having to wait in line for gasoline during the Arab oil embargo of 1973. "I thought there should be something that ordinary people could do to help themselves," he said. "I didn't like being dependent on somebody." He and his wife, Elke, determined that there were several forms of alternative energy they could adapt to the three-level Sylmar home they had built in 1964. First, they installed a solar panel system.
BUSINESS
March 30, 1993 | JACK SEARLES
Camarillo-based Siemens Solar Industries, whose parent recently filed a lawsuit alleging that it was a victim of fraud in purchasing the solar energy concern, has installed an automated manufacturing system aimed at increasing efficiency in the production of solar cells.
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