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Phyllis Schlafly

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NEWS
September 19, 1992 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A son of conservative activist Phyllis Schlafly has publicly revealed that he is homosexual, while at the same time defending his mother's political views and the Republican Party's "family values" campaign theme. "The family values movement is not anti-gay," said John F. Schlafly, a 41-year-old attorney who lives with his parents in Alton, Ill., and counts among his clients the Eagle Forum, the conservative group founded by his mother. "These people are not anti-gay.
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OPINION
March 31, 2011 | Meghan Daum
This may come as a surprise, but Phyllis Schlafly, legendary conservative and leader (that is, victor) in the battle against the Equal Rights Amendment, is alive and well and still publishing books. At 86, she just collaborated with her 43-year-old niece Suzanne Venker on "The Flipside of Feminism: What Conservative Women Know — and Men Can't Say. " If you've heard about this book, it might be because you read an interview with the authors on the Huffington Post with the headline "Feminists Love Divorce!"
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NEWS
July 2, 1996 | ROY RIVENBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She's been called a national nag, been splattered in the face by a pie hit man and caused such fits among feminists that one declared, "I'd like to burn you at the stake." Now in her 50th year of public life--a career spent fighting communism, feminism, abortion and other left-wing evils--Phyllis Schlafly is hooked on phonics. Yes, phonics. Foniks. The 71-year-old conservative says she'd rather be remembered for deep-sixing illiteracy than torpedoing the Equal Rights Amendment.
OPINION
April 14, 2007
Re "The ERA: still a bad idea," Current, April 8 Even after three years of law school and 10 years of practice, I am completely baffled by Phyllis Schlafly's analysis of the 1972 Equal Rights Amendment. On its face, the amendment did no more than prohibit the denial or abridgement of rights based on gender. Yet Schlafly insists that it "would actually have taken away some of women's rights." Nonsense. The ERA harbors no potential to subject women to military conscription (even assuming Congress were to reinstate the draft)
BOOKS
January 8, 1989
So, Good Housekeeping has put its seal of approval on Malcolm MacDougall's ad campaign that appears designed to sell more magazines to women, while at the same time, putting them back in "their place." Come on! The nostalgic fantasies and overblown wishful thinking professed in the article would cause even Phyllis Schlafly to blush! MARTHA ABELL Seal Beach
OPINION
February 16, 1986
Actually, I think it's more of a testament to the times that after I read Kilpatrick's short diatribe on feminism I chuckled to myself, "Dream on James!" instead of getting upset as I would have 10 years ago. I neither burn nor wear bras (I never buy them in the first place). I work as a professional, able to financially support causes I believe in. I own a house. I have one sister who's a doctor and another who's an engineer. Free abortions are included in my health plan.
NEWS
November 2, 1987 | Associated Press
Supreme Court nominee Douglas H. Ginsburg's wife performed two abortions and assisted in a third while a medical resident but later "made a personal decision not to perform these kinds of operations," White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said today. A Justice Department spokesman confirmed over the weekend that Dr. Hallee Perkins Morgan, wife of the Supreme Court nominee, performed abortions during medical training at Beth Israel Hospital in Boston. Terry H. Eastland, the spokesman, said Dr.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2004 | Anne-Marie O'Connor, Times Staff Writer
Phyllis Schlafly is a longtime opponent of the gay rights movement. Over the years, she has warned that the Equal Rights Amendment would lead to a recognition of gay rights. She has said people may demand "restrictions on homosexuals for public health reasons" because of AIDS.
NEWS
May 14, 1987 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
Some conservatives, angry over what they describe as the "self-appointed intrusion" of other conservatives into the AIDS debate, have risen to defend Surgeon General C. Everett Koop, who has been under attack for his outspoken views on how to combat the epidemic. "To ignore reality within our society is to act like ostriches," wrote Douglas O. Lee, chairman of Americans for Nuclear Energy, to ultraconservatives Phyllis Schlafly and Paul M.
OPINION
April 14, 2007
Re "The ERA: still a bad idea," Current, April 8 Even after three years of law school and 10 years of practice, I am completely baffled by Phyllis Schlafly's analysis of the 1972 Equal Rights Amendment. On its face, the amendment did no more than prohibit the denial or abridgement of rights based on gender. Yet Schlafly insists that it "would actually have taken away some of women's rights." Nonsense. The ERA harbors no potential to subject women to military conscription (even assuming Congress were to reinstate the draft)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2004 | Anne-Marie O'Connor, Times Staff Writer
Phyllis Schlafly is a longtime opponent of the gay rights movement. Over the years, she has warned that the Equal Rights Amendment would lead to a recognition of gay rights. She has said people may demand "restrictions on homosexuals for public health reasons" because of AIDS.
NEWS
July 2, 1996 | ROY RIVENBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She's been called a national nag, been splattered in the face by a pie hit man and caused such fits among feminists that one declared, "I'd like to burn you at the stake." Now in her 50th year of public life--a career spent fighting communism, feminism, abortion and other left-wing evils--Phyllis Schlafly is hooked on phonics. Yes, phonics. Foniks. The 71-year-old conservative says she'd rather be remembered for deep-sixing illiteracy than torpedoing the Equal Rights Amendment.
NEWS
September 19, 1992 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A son of conservative activist Phyllis Schlafly has publicly revealed that he is homosexual, while at the same time defending his mother's political views and the Republican Party's "family values" campaign theme. "The family values movement is not anti-gay," said John F. Schlafly, a 41-year-old attorney who lives with his parents in Alton, Ill., and counts among his clients the Eagle Forum, the conservative group founded by his mother. "These people are not anti-gay.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1989 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the world of archconservative Phyllis Schlafly, men are men and women are housewives--even if they work. In Sarah Weddington's world, men are men and women are whatever they want to be. Thursday night, Schlafly, 65, the matron saint of family-centered womanhood, and Weddington, 44, a Texas lawyer who won the landmark Roe vs. Wade case in 1973 that legalized abortion, debated inside the Bren Events Center at UC Irvine before an audience of about 800.
BOOKS
January 8, 1989
So, Good Housekeeping has put its seal of approval on Malcolm MacDougall's ad campaign that appears designed to sell more magazines to women, while at the same time, putting them back in "their place." Come on! The nostalgic fantasies and overblown wishful thinking professed in the article would cause even Phyllis Schlafly to blush! MARTHA ABELL Seal Beach
NEWS
November 2, 1987 | Associated Press
Supreme Court nominee Douglas H. Ginsburg's wife performed two abortions and assisted in a third while a medical resident but later "made a personal decision not to perform these kinds of operations," White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said today. A Justice Department spokesman confirmed over the weekend that Dr. Hallee Perkins Morgan, wife of the Supreme Court nominee, performed abortions during medical training at Beth Israel Hospital in Boston. Terry H. Eastland, the spokesman, said Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1989 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the world of archconservative Phyllis Schlafly, men are men and women are housewives--even if they work. In Sarah Weddington's world, men are men and women are whatever they want to be. Thursday night, Schlafly, 65, the matron saint of family-centered womanhood, and Weddington, 44, a Texas lawyer who won the landmark Roe vs. Wade case in 1973 that legalized abortion, debated inside the Bren Events Center at UC Irvine before an audience of about 800.
OPINION
March 31, 2011 | Meghan Daum
This may come as a surprise, but Phyllis Schlafly, legendary conservative and leader (that is, victor) in the battle against the Equal Rights Amendment, is alive and well and still publishing books. At 86, she just collaborated with her 43-year-old niece Suzanne Venker on "The Flipside of Feminism: What Conservative Women Know — and Men Can't Say. " If you've heard about this book, it might be because you read an interview with the authors on the Huffington Post with the headline "Feminists Love Divorce!"
NEWS
May 14, 1987 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
Some conservatives, angry over what they describe as the "self-appointed intrusion" of other conservatives into the AIDS debate, have risen to defend Surgeon General C. Everett Koop, who has been under attack for his outspoken views on how to combat the epidemic. "To ignore reality within our society is to act like ostriches," wrote Douglas O. Lee, chairman of Americans for Nuclear Energy, to ultraconservatives Phyllis Schlafly and Paul M.
OPINION
February 16, 1986
Actually, I think it's more of a testament to the times that after I read Kilpatrick's short diatribe on feminism I chuckled to myself, "Dream on James!" instead of getting upset as I would have 10 years ago. I neither burn nor wear bras (I never buy them in the first place). I work as a professional, able to financially support causes I believe in. I own a house. I have one sister who's a doctor and another who's an engineer. Free abortions are included in my health plan.
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