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Physical Examinations

HEALTH
February 25, 2002 | BOB ROSENBLATT
In this age of managed care, many of us no longer have easy access to the best and brightest in medicine. Unless, of course, money is no object--or someone else is picking up the tab. If that's the case, you might get to experience something called the "executive physical." For $2,000 and up, you can spend two days getting poked and prodded, undergoing a battery of tests and talking at length to a top-notch doctor about your eating habits, family medical history and exercise routine.
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SPORTS
January 24, 1990 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's required neurological examination for professional boxers, knocked from ringpost to ringpost by managers and promoters since its inception in 1986, nearly cost the Forum a world championship fight Monday. Raul Perez, the World Boxing Council bantamweight champion, failed the exam twice last week and didn't pass it until his third try, at mid-afternoon Monday, hours before he was to fight Gaby Canizales at the Forum.
NEWS
July 27, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
After criticism from women's and human rights organizations, Turkish Health Minister Osman Durmus denied that he authorized virginity tests for high school nursing students suspected of having sex. Durmus said this month that high school girls studying at government-run nursing schools would be expelled if they had sex and barred from studying at other government institutions. Newspapers reported that he was authorizing virginity tests, an order that nurses' and women's groups vowed to fight.
HEALTH
January 1, 2001 | JANE E. ALLEN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Doctors are said to make lousy patients. Now comes a study indicating that many docs avoid being patients altogether. Researchers at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine decided to examine how well doctors took care of their health after previous studies suggested that doctors' bad habits--among them smoking and drinking--influence what they tell patients.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 1994
A high-tech program unveiled Monday will allow suspected victims of child abuse in the Antelope Valley to be examined by medical experts working in Los Angeles, saving the children a time-consuming, often unsettling 150-mile round trip. In a Lancaster hospital room decorated with Disney characters, children will be examined with a magnification device that can send video images over a telephone line to Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center.
SPORTS
February 18, 1993 | BOB NIGHTENGALE
Tommy Craig, the Toronto Blue Jay trainer, said Wednesday that third baseman Kelly Gruber complained of a sore left shoulder and was examined after the third game of the World Series. It's the first time anyone in the Blue Jay organization has verified that Gruber had injured his shoulder, but Craig insisted the club was unaware of the severity. "I remember after the game, it was sore," Craig said. "We had the doctors check him out, but they didn't find anything.
NEWS
April 12, 1990 | United Press International
President Bush, described as in excellent health, will undergo a routine annual physical examination today at Bethesda Naval Hospital, the White House announced Wednesday. Bush, who jogs regularly and plays tennis, continues to suffer from a mild case of arthritis in his hips, a slight hearing loss sustained during his flight days in World War II and allergies related to bee stings and seasonal changes. The exam will conducted under the direction of the White House physician, Dr. Burton Lee.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Many women over 50 don't get mammograms because they mistakenly think they don't need them, according to a recent American Medical Assn. study. The study found that while more than 90% of the women polled in various surveys visited a doctor regularly, just 25% to 41% received X-ray breast examinations during the previous year.
NEWS
March 10, 1990 | JAN ZIEGLER, Jan Ziegler writes for American Health and Psychology Today
A routine physical checkup in the 1990s could become something quite different from what you're accustomed to. Doctors will probably be doing a lot less testing and a lot more talking about how to stay well. Most periodic physical exams should be devoted to counseling and motivating patients to adopt more healthful life styles, advises a recent report by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, a group of 20 independent physicians and health experts working under the U.S.
SPORTS
October 7, 1990 | MARK HEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Lakers said they will send No. 2 draft pick Tony Smith home for more tests after his preseason physical showed an irregular heartbeat. Smith, a 6-foot-4 guard from Marquette, was supposed to fly to Los Angeles this morning and undergo tests at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. "It could be one test or it could be two weeks," trainer Gary Vitti said.
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