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Physical Examinations

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1990 | LANIE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When former president Jimmy Carter's sister, Gloria Carter Spann, was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in December, a leading oncologist suggested that the whole family undergo tests for that type of cancer. Carter's father, James Earl Carter Sr.; his brother, Billy Carter, and his sister, Ruth Carter Stapleton, all died of pancreatic cancer. And after actress Gilda Radner died last year of ovarian cancer, New York cancer researcher H.
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NEWS
April 1, 1994 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For many women, the only obstacle standing between them and a career with the Los Angeles Police Department is a six-foot wooden wall. Scaling "the wall" is one of the Police Academy's pass-fail entrance requirements, part of an intense physical exam designed to weed out the weak from the strong. Fail it and forget a badge. The wall, with its emphasis on upper body strength, is one of the biggest reasons that women are turned away from the department.
HEALTH
February 25, 2002 | BOB ROSENBLATT
In this age of managed care, many of us no longer have easy access to the best and brightest in medicine. Unless, of course, money is no object--or someone else is picking up the tab. If that's the case, you might get to experience something called the "executive physical." For $2,000 and up, you can spend two days getting poked and prodded, undergoing a battery of tests and talking at length to a top-notch doctor about your eating habits, family medical history and exercise routine.
SPORTS
January 24, 1990 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's required neurological examination for professional boxers, knocked from ringpost to ringpost by managers and promoters since its inception in 1986, nearly cost the Forum a world championship fight Monday. Raul Perez, the World Boxing Council bantamweight champion, failed the exam twice last week and didn't pass it until his third try, at mid-afternoon Monday, hours before he was to fight Gaby Canizales at the Forum.
SPORTS
July 19, 2003 | From Associated Press
A Northwestern University doctor acknowledged burning records of a physical he gave Rashidi Wheeler three weeks before the football player died during a 2001 training drill. Dr. Mark Gardner testified for nearly 6 1/2 hours Thursday in a lawsuit that Wheeler's parents filed against the university. Only lawyers for Wheeler's family were able to question Gardner before the deposition ended for the day. He is expected to continue questioning at a later date.
HEALTH
February 13, 2006 | Sara Solovitch, Special to The Times
SITTING in a cold, sterile room in a blue paper dress, you tell yourself you're taking care of business. That's when the doctor listens to your heart and lungs, hits the knees with a mallet, shines a flashlight into eyes, nose and mouth -- and pronounces you fit as a fiddle. Ready to go for another year. Don't kid yourself. Study after study has found that the annual physical exam is almost worthless, a medical anachronism that should be buried alongside the iron lung and mercurochrome.
NEWS
July 27, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
After criticism from women's and human rights organizations, Turkish Health Minister Osman Durmus denied that he authorized virginity tests for high school nursing students suspected of having sex. Durmus said this month that high school girls studying at government-run nursing schools would be expelled if they had sex and barred from studying at other government institutions. Newspapers reported that he was authorizing virginity tests, an order that nurses' and women's groups vowed to fight.
HEALTH
January 1, 2001 | JANE E. ALLEN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Doctors are said to make lousy patients. Now comes a study indicating that many docs avoid being patients altogether. Researchers at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine decided to examine how well doctors took care of their health after previous studies suggested that doctors' bad habits--among them smoking and drinking--influence what they tell patients.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 1994
A high-tech program unveiled Monday will allow suspected victims of child abuse in the Antelope Valley to be examined by medical experts working in Los Angeles, saving the children a time-consuming, often unsettling 150-mile round trip. In a Lancaster hospital room decorated with Disney characters, children will be examined with a magnification device that can send video images over a telephone line to Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center.
SPORTS
February 18, 1993 | BOB NIGHTENGALE
Tommy Craig, the Toronto Blue Jay trainer, said Wednesday that third baseman Kelly Gruber complained of a sore left shoulder and was examined after the third game of the World Series. It's the first time anyone in the Blue Jay organization has verified that Gruber had injured his shoulder, but Craig insisted the club was unaware of the severity. "I remember after the game, it was sore," Craig said. "We had the doctors check him out, but they didn't find anything.
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