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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2006 | Arin Gencer, Times Staff Writer
Her face illuminated by the fluorescent white glow of two computer monitors, Dr. Jenna Liu examined a CT scan of a car crash victim's stomach. Liu, a radiology resident at UC San Diego Medical Center, scanned through shots of the patient's kidneys, noting the abnormal fluid around one. It wasn't long before the phone rang. A fax had arrived. "That's NightHawk," Liu said.
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HEALTH
December 21, 2009 | By Amina Khan
Risk-taking adolescent behavior: It's not all sex, drugs and alcohol. There's also the choking game -- otherwise known as "space monkey," "sleeper hold" and "funky chicken." The game consists of two main variants. One can be a solo operation, using a necktie, belt or other type of binding to put pressure on the carotid artery in the neck. The other method involves a partner, who can apply pressure to the neck or chest until the subject passes out, cutting off blood flow to the brain.
NEWS
June 18, 1995 | SUZANNE POSSEHL, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
Like many other expectant mothers in northern Appalachia, Janice Hay drove 100 miles to see her obstetrician. But on the winter night that her baby was born at home, 15 weeks prematurely, the drive to Burlington, Vt., would have been fatal. By the time Hay, a 37-year-old fitness instructor, got to the local hospital in an ambulance, the 1.8-pound infant wasn't breathing. Dr. Hemant Pandhi, a new general practitioner from India, began mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. In 10 minutes, Hay's newborn son, Blake, let out his first cry. "That's why I came here," said Pandhi, 46, who passed up a higher-paying offer in Albany, N.Y., to practice medicine in Ticonderoga, a logging town of 4,600 people on the Vermont border.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1989
It is impossible for me to understand how the physicians caring for Contreras would not honor his wishes and those of the family. Nurse Rangel obviously understood and apparently acted to fill a void created by the inaction of physicians. NEIL BARBER MD Rancho Palos Verdes
NEWS
September 18, 1985 | United Press International
The editor of the New England Journal of Medicine today chastised the growing number of physicians with financial conflicts of interest that could interfere with their treatment of patients. With increasing frequency medical practitioners are seeking profits from business arrangements with hospitals, equipment manufacturers and companies providing ambulatory health care services, Dr. Arnold S. Relman said.
OPINION
September 18, 2013 | By Glenn D. Braunstein
This year, 36.6 million people will be admitted to U.S. hospitals. Each patient will stay an average of 4.8 days, and the cost for all those hospitalizations will reach into the billions. Is all that time spent in hospitals good for patients? Hospitals, of course, are vital institutions that save lives. When someone needs intensive, around-the-clock care, there is no substitute. But as physicians and hospital staffs know well, the longer a patient stays in a hospital, the more perilous the hospitalization can become.
SCIENCE
February 25, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
You're more likely to get a doctor's appointment in Canada if you're rich than if you're poor, even though the government pays the bills, according to a new study. In the spring and summer of 2011, a team of Canadian researchers posing as prospective patients cold-called 375 doctors offices in Ontario to schedule a check-up. The researchers posed in each call as one of four types: a wealthy banker in good health, a wealthy banker with diabetes and back problems, a welfare recipient in good health, or a welfare recipient with diabetes and back problems.
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