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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Dr. Clement A. Finch, a University of Washington hematologist who became known as Mr. Iron because of his pioneering research on the metabolism of that crucial metal, died June 28 at his home in La Jolla. He was 94, and the cause of death was not revealed. Iron plays a key role in many aspects of bodily function but is most important as a component of hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying component of red blood cells. When Finch began his work, clinicians could diagnose iron deficiency anemia but were in the dark about its causes.
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HEALTH
December 21, 2009 | By Amina Khan
Risk-taking adolescent behavior: It's not all sex, drugs and alcohol. There's also the choking game -- otherwise known as "space monkey," "sleeper hold" and "funky chicken." The game consists of two main variants. One can be a solo operation, using a necktie, belt or other type of binding to put pressure on the carotid artery in the neck. The other method involves a partner, who can apply pressure to the neck or chest until the subject passes out, cutting off blood flow to the brain.
NEWS
June 18, 1995 | SUZANNE POSSEHL, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
Like many other expectant mothers in northern Appalachia, Janice Hay drove 100 miles to see her obstetrician. But on the winter night that her baby was born at home, 15 weeks prematurely, the drive to Burlington, Vt., would have been fatal. By the time Hay, a 37-year-old fitness instructor, got to the local hospital in an ambulance, the 1.8-pound infant wasn't breathing. Dr. Hemant Pandhi, a new general practitioner from India, began mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. In 10 minutes, Hay's newborn son, Blake, let out his first cry. "That's why I came here," said Pandhi, 46, who passed up a higher-paying offer in Albany, N.Y., to practice medicine in Ticonderoga, a logging town of 4,600 people on the Vermont border.
OPINION
September 18, 2013 | By Glenn D. Braunstein
This year, 36.6 million people will be admitted to U.S. hospitals. Each patient will stay an average of 4.8 days, and the cost for all those hospitalizations will reach into the billions. Is all that time spent in hospitals good for patients? Hospitals, of course, are vital institutions that save lives. When someone needs intensive, around-the-clock care, there is no substitute. But as physicians and hospital staffs know well, the longer a patient stays in a hospital, the more perilous the hospitalization can become.
NATIONAL
November 21, 2013 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
A surging share of Americans believe that doctors should do everything possible to save a life despite concerns over the costs and consequences of such intensive care. The new survey, released Thursday by the Pew Research Center, surprised doctors and bioethicists who have advocated for physicians and families to carefully weigh aggressive medical treatments for patients near death. Invasive procedures may not lengthen or improve life for the chronically ill, they warn. Many Americans agree with them: Two out of three people believe there are some situations in which a patient should be allowed to die, the survey found.
BOOKS
April 16, 1989 | ELENA BRUNET
During the years of the Great Depression, a marvel of civil engineering comprising a dam, tunnel, power station and plant, was erected in the hills of West Virginia. For years, Union Carbide boasted "that the Hawk's Nest hydroelectric plant could illuminate the entire city of Charleston." Yet the untold story of this monumental achievement is the cost in human lives: By conservative estimates, more than 750 workers, mostly migrants and mostly blacks, died from acute silicosis, an occupational, inhalant-induced lung disease, in the construction of the great three-mile-long Hawk's Nest Tunnel.
SCIENCE
February 25, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
You're more likely to get a doctor's appointment in Canada if you're rich than if you're poor, even though the government pays the bills, according to a new study. In the spring and summer of 2011, a team of Canadian researchers posing as prospective patients cold-called 375 doctors offices in Ontario to schedule a check-up. The researchers posed in each call as one of four types: a wealthy banker in good health, a wealthy banker with diabetes and back problems, a welfare recipient in good health, or a welfare recipient with diabetes and back problems.
BOOKS
August 17, 1986 | Patricia Seidenbaum
"Physicians take their own lives with greater frequency and generally at an earlier age than do members of the general population." For female physicians the rate is four times as high as among other contemporary women. Chemical dependency among all physicians is over 30 times higher than the general population.
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