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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Dr. Clement A. Finch, a University of Washington hematologist who became known as Mr. Iron because of his pioneering research on the metabolism of that crucial metal, died June 28 at his home in La Jolla. He was 94, and the cause of death was not revealed. Iron plays a key role in many aspects of bodily function but is most important as a component of hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying component of red blood cells. When Finch began his work, clinicians could diagnose iron deficiency anemia but were in the dark about its causes.
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HEALTH
December 21, 2009 | By Amina Khan
Risk-taking adolescent behavior: It's not all sex, drugs and alcohol. There's also the choking game -- otherwise known as "space monkey," "sleeper hold" and "funky chicken." The game consists of two main variants. One can be a solo operation, using a necktie, belt or other type of binding to put pressure on the carotid artery in the neck. The other method involves a partner, who can apply pressure to the neck or chest until the subject passes out, cutting off blood flow to the brain.
NEWS
June 18, 1995 | SUZANNE POSSEHL, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
Like many other expectant mothers in northern Appalachia, Janice Hay drove 100 miles to see her obstetrician. But on the winter night that her baby was born at home, 15 weeks prematurely, the drive to Burlington, Vt., would have been fatal. By the time Hay, a 37-year-old fitness instructor, got to the local hospital in an ambulance, the 1.8-pound infant wasn't breathing. Dr. Hemant Pandhi, a new general practitioner from India, began mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. In 10 minutes, Hay's newborn son, Blake, let out his first cry. "That's why I came here," said Pandhi, 46, who passed up a higher-paying offer in Albany, N.Y., to practice medicine in Ticonderoga, a logging town of 4,600 people on the Vermont border.
NEWS
May 12, 1991
Please pass on a hearty "well done" to Shari Roan for her revealing articles on factitious disorders, ("Playing for Sympathy" and "The Factitious Career: Faking the Faces of Illness," April 21). Her accuracy and research do her credit. These cases test the acumen and patience of any physician and will even set physicians at odds with each other over diagnosis and treatment. The cases we have discovered in our hospital are known to all floors and are well known to the emergency room, where they often come at night to test the discernment of almost every new physicians on call.
HEALTH
March 13, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
After the surging ocean waters spawned by Japan's magnitude 8.9 earthquake receded, the drowned were only the first victims to be counted. In the coming days, physicians and public health officials along Japan's hard-hit eastern coast can expect a second wave of tsunami victims with aspiration-related illnesses, trauma and crush wounds, as well as the threat of disease spread by contaminated water. As they tend to survivors, Japanese officials can look to the experience of health workers who ministered to victims after the massive tsunami that inundated Indian Ocean nations on Dec. 26, 2004.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1989
It is impossible for me to understand how the physicians caring for Contreras would not honor his wishes and those of the family. Nurse Rangel obviously understood and apparently acted to fill a void created by the inaction of physicians. NEIL BARBER MD Rancho Palos Verdes
HEALTH
July 17, 2000
I appreciated your article about the expanding services offered by local pharmacists ("A Far Different Pharmacy," June 26). Physicians who feel threatened by pharmacists offering disease management and education services may be missing the point. The expanding role of pharmacists is complementary to that of physicians. In fact, a growing number of pharmacists are setting up collaborative relationships with doctors. In a health-care system in which doctors have limited time to spend with their patients, pharmacists are stepping up and providing quality services that patients need, increasingly in collaboration with physicians.
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