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June 4, 2006 | Arin Gencer, Times Staff Writer
Her face illuminated by the fluorescent white glow of two computer monitors, Dr. Jenna Liu examined a CT scan of a car crash victim's stomach. Liu, a radiology resident at UC San Diego Medical Center, scanned through shots of the patient's kidneys, noting the abnormal fluid around one. It wasn't long before the phone rang. A fax had arrived. "That's NightHawk," Liu said.
July 14, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Dr. Clement A. Finch, a University of Washington hematologist who became known as Mr. Iron because of his pioneering research on the metabolism of that crucial metal, died June 28 at his home in La Jolla. He was 94, and the cause of death was not revealed. Iron plays a key role in many aspects of bodily function but is most important as a component of hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying component of red blood cells. When Finch began his work, clinicians could diagnose iron deficiency anemia but were in the dark about its causes.
Like many other expectant mothers in northern Appalachia, Janice Hay drove 100 miles to see her obstetrician. But on the winter night that her baby was born at home, 15 weeks prematurely, the drive to Burlington, Vt., would have been fatal. By the time Hay, a 37-year-old fitness instructor, got to the local hospital in an ambulance, the 1.8-pound infant wasn't breathing. Dr. Hemant Pandhi, a new general practitioner from India, began mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. In 10 minutes, Hay's newborn son, Blake, let out his first cry. "That's why I came here," said Pandhi, 46, who passed up a higher-paying offer in Albany, N.Y., to practice medicine in Ticonderoga, a logging town of 4,600 people on the Vermont border.
September 12, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Doctors are supposed to help patients eat healthfully - but they're not exactly dietary angels themselves.    Skipping from meeting (snacks provided) to conference (catered, with jumbo cookies) to lunch at the hospital cafeteria (sugary soda on the side), many fall into the same bad habits the rest of us do, consuming too many calories, gaining too much weight, and eating all the wrong foods. At least one group of researchers thinks it's time for this to change.  Writing in the journal JAMA on Tuesday (subscription required)
September 18, 2013 | By Glenn D. Braunstein
This year, 36.6 million people will be admitted to U.S. hospitals. Each patient will stay an average of 4.8 days, and the cost for all those hospitalizations will reach into the billions. Is all that time spent in hospitals good for patients? Hospitals, of course, are vital institutions that save lives. When someone needs intensive, around-the-clock care, there is no substitute. But as physicians and hospital staffs know well, the longer a patient stays in a hospital, the more perilous the hospitalization can become.
August 17, 1986 | Patricia Seidenbaum
"Physicians take their own lives with greater frequency and generally at an earlier age than do members of the general population." For female physicians the rate is four times as high as among other contemporary women. Chemical dependency among all physicians is over 30 times higher than the general population.
November 21, 2013 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
A surging share of Americans believe that doctors should do everything possible to save a life despite concerns over the costs and consequences of such intensive care. The new survey, released Thursday by the Pew Research Center, surprised doctors and bioethicists who have advocated for physicians and families to carefully weigh aggressive medical treatments for patients near death. Invasive procedures may not lengthen or improve life for the chronically ill, they warn. Many Americans agree with them: Two out of three people believe there are some situations in which a patient should be allowed to die, the survey found.
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