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NEWS
October 14, 1998 | K.C. COLE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Consolidating a remarkable winning streak for California, Nobel Prizes in physics and chemistry were awarded Tuesday to Stanford and UC Santa Barbara scientists. Both prizes were given for work bringing to light the obscure inner world of atoms and making possible quantum leaps in the design of materials and drugs--work in which physics and chemistry are tightly intertwined.
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SCIENCE
October 4, 2006 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Two astrophysicists from Berkeley and NASA won the 2006 Nobel Prize in physics on Tuesday for their discovery of the strongest evidence to date that the universe began with a big bang, a feat the Nobel committee said "marked the inception of cosmology as a precise science." John C. Mather, 60, of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2001 | JENIFER RAGLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Think back to the last few weeks of college. Remember the all-night cram sessions? The paper-writing marathons? The 11th-hour scramble to wrap up that final research project? Now multiply that by four. That is what Keith Copsey's life is like these days. In two weeks, the 23-year-old from Camarillo will become the first UC Santa Barbara student to graduate with four bachelor's degrees simultaneously.
NEWS
January 5, 1996 | K.C. COLE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Physicists for the first time have created atoms of antimatter, offering hope of finding clues to one of the most perplexing of mysteries: Why is our universe made of matter and not antimatter? And why does matter exist at all? According to news reports Thursday, the first anti-atoms were created at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN) in Geneva. Some U.S. physicists were not aware of the result, but when informed they weren't surprised, because the finding was expected.
NEWS
January 19, 2001 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a feat akin to catching lightning in a bottle, researchers have been able to reduce the speed of light from 186,000 miles per second to zero, trapping light beams for short periods of time before allowing them to burst forth again at full speed. The achievement does not break any laws of physics, but it does illustrate the mysterious, bewildering world of quantum physics, where things are not always what they seem and where physicists often do the seemingly impossible.
NEWS
April 27, 1994 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ and JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Scientists at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory announced Tuesday that they have detected strong evidence of an elusive particle at the heart of all matter in the universe, providing the best proof yet of the hidden structure of the material world. "We aren't looking at the face of God, but we are deciphering his handwriting," said Thomas Muller, a UCLA physicist who was a member of the team that detected the presence of the top quark, as the subatomic particle is known.
NEWS
July 14, 1995 | K. C. COLE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
In a discovery that experts are calling breathtaking and beautiful--and of "Nobel Prize caliber"--physicists at the University of Colorado at Boulder have created an entirely new state of matter. It exists only in the coldest spot in the universe, which is currently a carrot-size tube in the laboratory of physicists Carl Weiman and Eric Cornell.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1990 | DAVID GRITTEN
Silent and apparently inert, Stephen W. Hawking sits in the wheelchair to which he is confined, as members of a film crew buzz around him on a sound stage, shooting him from almost every conceivable angle. However you look at it, Hawking is not your average leading man. Yet here he sits, up on a pedestal in front of a blue screen, as the cameras bestow upon him all the attention usually reserved for a Redford, Eastwood or Costner.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1997 | K.C. COLE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Award-winning physicist Lawrence Krauss of Case Western Reserve University specializes in cosmic questions such as the age and size of the universe, the origins of matter and the nature of the mysterious "dark matter" that seems to pervade the universe. While Krauss has written several popular books on physics--most notably, "Fear of Physics"--nothing prepared him for the success of his recent bestseller, "The Physics of Star Trek" (HarperCollins, 1995).
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