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NEWS
January 1, 1995 | K.C. COLE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Every hamburger and Volkswagen, every newborn child and billion-year-old planet, is fashioned from the same elementary ingredients. The difference is only: how much, how many, in what combination? Chemists are constantly trying to understand the architecture of atoms, seeking to discover, or even create, new elements. So far they have come up with 19 beyond the 92 elements that occur in nature.
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NEWS
October 15, 1987 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
Two American chemists, including UCLA's Donald J. Cram, and a Frenchman have won the 1987 Nobel Prize in chemistry, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences announced Wednesday. The chemists were honored for their work over the last two decades in making relatively uncomplicated compounds that perform the same biological functions as natural proteins.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2003 | Stuart Silverstein, Times Staff Writer
Here he was, a top physics researcher in a basement lab, where flooding, power failures and minute building vibrations were damaging his long-term experiments. UC Berkeley's "facilities were inadequate, and they were getting worse," said J.C. Seamus Davis, a 42-year-old specialist in low-temperature physics. Then Cornell came calling, offering him new quarters and equipment worth up to $4 million.
SCIENCE
July 26, 2008 | John Johnson Jr., Times Staff Writer
For two decades, Stanford University physicist Leonard Susskind battled cosmologist Stephen Hawking over the behavior of black holes. Hawking said that when black holes eat their fill, they disappear, taking with them everything they consumed over their billions of years of existence. Susskind found this idea so disturbing that he publicly declared war -- a conflict he describes in his new book, "The Black Hole War."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1990 | RICHARD BEENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Try spending a pleasant Saturday figuring out the inner volume of a glass jar. You can use a roll of string, a couple of weights, two stopwatches, a physics book and a pair of scissors. You have 30 minutes. Stumped? Then try this one: If a ball was dropped from a table that is 19.6 meters above the floor, how long does it take for the ball to reach the floor? We'll give you a hint: G equals 9.8m/sec, V initial equals 0 m/s. This is not stuff for the faint of heart or weak of mind.
NEWS
October 14, 1998 | K.C. COLE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Consolidating a remarkable winning streak for California, Nobel Prizes in physics and chemistry were awarded Tuesday to Stanford and UC Santa Barbara scientists. Both prizes were given for work bringing to light the obscure inner world of atoms and making possible quantum leaps in the design of materials and drugs--work in which physics and chemistry are tightly intertwined.
SCIENCE
October 4, 2006 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Two astrophysicists from Berkeley and NASA won the 2006 Nobel Prize in physics on Tuesday for their discovery of the strongest evidence to date that the universe began with a big bang, a feat the Nobel committee said "marked the inception of cosmology as a precise science." John C. Mather, 60, of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2001 | JENIFER RAGLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Think back to the last few weeks of college. Remember the all-night cram sessions? The paper-writing marathons? The 11th-hour scramble to wrap up that final research project? Now multiply that by four. That is what Keith Copsey's life is like these days. In two weeks, the 23-year-old from Camarillo will become the first UC Santa Barbara student to graduate with four bachelor's degrees simultaneously.
NEWS
January 5, 1996 | K.C. COLE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Physicists for the first time have created atoms of antimatter, offering hope of finding clues to one of the most perplexing of mysteries: Why is our universe made of matter and not antimatter? And why does matter exist at all? According to news reports Thursday, the first anti-atoms were created at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN) in Geneva. Some U.S. physicists were not aware of the result, but when informed they weren't surprised, because the finding was expected.
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