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Physiology

TRAVEL
September 14, 2004 | James Gilden, Special to The Times
"We are in great haste to construct a magnetic telegraph from Maine to Texas," Henry David Thoreau wrote in "Walden," which was first published 150 years ago. "But Maine and Texas, it may be, have nothing important to communicate." Thoreau would be astonished at just how much information we have to communicate a century and a half later. How much of it is actually important remains a question.
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HEALTH
March 8, 2004 | Jane E. Allen, Times Staff Writer
Pear-shaped people may have more trouble losing weight -- from their hips, thighs and posterior, specifically -- but it's the apple-shaped folks who need to redouble their efforts. Their fat is more dangerous. Researchers have known that carrying extra pounds around the belly and upper body increases the risk of hypertension, heart disease, stroke, diabetes and cancers of the breast, ovary and prostate. Now they're learning why.
HEALTH
November 24, 2003 | Judy Foreman, Special to The Times
When Dr. Darlyne Johnson, 46, found out three years ago that she needed hernia surgery, she balked. "I knew what was going to happen -- I'd get sick." Each time Johnson has had surgery over the years, she's wound up with such terrible nausea and vomiting from painkillers that she had to stay in the hospital overnight. This time, however, she heard about a device called ON-Q.
SCIENCE
October 8, 2002 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A La Jolla scientist and two colleagues from MIT and Cambridge University who used the simple roundworm to unravel the complex processes controlling the birth and death of cells in humans on Monday received the 2002 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine.
NEWS
September 10, 2000 | IRA DREYFUSS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Common ideas about stretches may stretch the truth, researchers say. "Stretching recommendations are clouded by misconceptions and conflicting research reports," said a report in a medical journal, The Physician and Sportsmedicine. Stretching is supposed to reduce the risk of injury, relieve pain from exercise and improve performance. But the benefits are only partly supported by the evidence, the experts said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2000 | HOLLY SELBY, BALTIMORE SUN
On the big screen in front of me, a large Victorian house looms pitch-black, and a murderer is lurking somewhere inside. Michelle Pfeiffer, barely ruffled though someone has just tried to drown her in her own bathtub, is slowly backing down the stairs. I'm scrunched on the edge of my seat, muscles knotted with tension. The camera zooms in on Pfeiffer's bare feet and then on her anxious face.
NEWS
April 21, 2000 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The discovery of an ancient heart of stone--the first ever found belonging to a dinosaur--reveals that many of these primordial creatures were almost certainly warmblooded, like a modern bird or mammal, researchers announced today. Detailed, computerized X-ray scans of the 66-million-year-old fossilized heart show that its muscular chambers could have pumped enough richly oxygenated blood for the primitive creature to caper, gambol and leap with all the abandon of an animated special effect.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2000
Yale scientists say they can stimulate sweet, sour or salty tastes by manipulating the temperature of the tongue. By warming or cooling certain areas of the tongue, they said they can produce "thermal taste" similar to tastes caused by sugars, acids and other chemicals. Barry Green and Alberto Cruz showed that nerves on the tongue that respond to chemicals in food also are vulnerable to temperature. But the nerves sensitive to temperature are only found in certain areas of the tongue.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1999
Please do not propagate the misinformation that Laura Schlessinger is a "psychologist" ("Schlessinger Is Preparing Daily Syndicated Talk Show," by Judith Michaelson, May 6). Dr. Laura has a master's level license from the state of California as a marriage and family counselor. She has a PhD in physiology, not psychology or counseling. Funny that she uses the "Dr." in her radio psychology program, even though it misleads the public as to her genuine credentials and qualifications. SUZANNE R. LAKE, Pasadena
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1998 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Brain scans of healthy adolescents reveal for the first time what many parents have long suspected--that teenagers don't think or feel the same way as adults, in part, because their brains actually work differently. The researchers discovered that teenagers not only process emotions more intensely and more indiscriminately than adults, but also appear to use their brains differently to handle what they are told.
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