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Physiology

HEALTH
November 24, 2003 | Judy Foreman, Special to The Times
When Dr. Darlyne Johnson, 46, found out three years ago that she needed hernia surgery, she balked. "I knew what was going to happen -- I'd get sick." Each time Johnson has had surgery over the years, she's wound up with such terrible nausea and vomiting from painkillers that she had to stay in the hospital overnight. This time, however, she heard about a device called ON-Q.
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SCIENCE
October 8, 2002 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A La Jolla scientist and two colleagues from MIT and Cambridge University who used the simple roundworm to unravel the complex processes controlling the birth and death of cells in humans on Monday received the 2002 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine.
NEWS
September 10, 2000 | IRA DREYFUSS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Common ideas about stretches may stretch the truth, researchers say. "Stretching recommendations are clouded by misconceptions and conflicting research reports," said a report in a medical journal, The Physician and Sportsmedicine. Stretching is supposed to reduce the risk of injury, relieve pain from exercise and improve performance. But the benefits are only partly supported by the evidence, the experts said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2000 | HOLLY SELBY, BALTIMORE SUN
On the big screen in front of me, a large Victorian house looms pitch-black, and a murderer is lurking somewhere inside. Michelle Pfeiffer, barely ruffled though someone has just tried to drown her in her own bathtub, is slowly backing down the stairs. I'm scrunched on the edge of my seat, muscles knotted with tension. The camera zooms in on Pfeiffer's bare feet and then on her anxious face.
NEWS
April 21, 2000 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The discovery of an ancient heart of stone--the first ever found belonging to a dinosaur--reveals that many of these primordial creatures were almost certainly warmblooded, like a modern bird or mammal, researchers announced today. Detailed, computerized X-ray scans of the 66-million-year-old fossilized heart show that its muscular chambers could have pumped enough richly oxygenated blood for the primitive creature to caper, gambol and leap with all the abandon of an animated special effect.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1999
Please do not propagate the misinformation that Laura Schlessinger is a "psychologist" ("Schlessinger Is Preparing Daily Syndicated Talk Show," by Judith Michaelson, May 6). Dr. Laura has a master's level license from the state of California as a marriage and family counselor. She has a PhD in physiology, not psychology or counseling. Funny that she uses the "Dr." in her radio psychology program, even though it misleads the public as to her genuine credentials and qualifications. SUZANNE R. LAKE, Pasadena
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1998 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Brain scans of healthy adolescents reveal for the first time what many parents have long suspected--that teenagers don't think or feel the same way as adults, in part, because their brains actually work differently. The researchers discovered that teenagers not only process emotions more intensely and more indiscriminately than adults, but also appear to use their brains differently to handle what they are told.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1998 | MARCIDA DODSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Talk about leaving the rat race. Twenty-two baby rats, the research subjects of a UC Irvine professor, will be launched into outer space today aboard the space shuttle Columbia, to float about in their cages in zero gravity for 17 days. UCI's Kenneth Baldwin, professor of physiology and biophysics, hopes to discern information from the muscles of baby rats in space that could help gravity-bound humans on Earth.
NEWS
March 3, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Scientists reported the first strong physiological evidence that lesbian and bisexual women may be biologically different from heterosexual women. Researchers at the University of Texas in Austin found that the hearing of homosexual and bisexual women tends to be a bit more like that of men. The findings suggest that homosexual and bisexual women develop in subtly different ways than heterosexual women.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1997 | LESLIE EARNEST
They lounge around the classroom and lean against cupboards. Some actually hang from the ceiling. They are the "trash bodies" completed by Thurston Middle School students this week, just in time for display at Thursday night's open house. "You walk into the lab and it's like, 'Aaaah!' " said science teacher Carrie Leventhal, making the sound of a stifled scream. "The night of the living dead."
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