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Pico Aliso Housing Project

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1997
The long-awaited demolition of the Pico-Aliso housing project began Thursday as a wrecking ball crashed into 16 of the 577 units that will be leveled in the first phase of a $50-million renovation. In January a brief ceremonial demolition was held, but Thursday's work marked the beginning of what authorities expect to be a five-month dismantling of the project. Last month, more than 40 residents protested what they view as forced displacement from their homes.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2004 | Anna Gorman, Times Staff Writer
Instead of simply retelling the Easter story this year, one East Los Angeles housing project celebrated its own modern-day version Sunday of the tale of death and resurrection. The murder of 19-year-old Jesus Alejandro Hernandez last month brought new life to the residents of the Pico-Aliso housing project and prompted them to push for more security in their neighborhood. They held prayer services and news conferences and even fasted to pressure city officials to meet their demands.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1997
More than 40 residents of the Pico-Aliso housing project in Boyle Heights staged a demonstration Friday in front of the Housing Authority near MacArthur Park to protest what they view as forced displacement from their homes. The residents of the Eastside housing development, which is being torn down and rebuilt, complained that the housing authority pressured them into signing an amendment to their lease contract that does not guarantee them a unit in the new Pico-Aliso.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2001 | ANTONIO OLIVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The construction scaffolding still surrounds an unfinished Pico Aliso senior citizens housing complex in Boyle Heights. But community leaders nonetheless gathered Thursday beneath the $6.5-million structure's wood skeleton at 1st and Clarence streets to celebrate what they see as another manifestation of a long-awaited neighborhood renaissance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1994 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 19-year-old man apparently trying to elude police was killed Saturday after he jumped from a second-story housing project window near Boyle Heights, prompting a protest march by other project residents Sunday. Los Angeles police officers investigating alleged drug sales near the Pico-Aliso housing project began to chase the man, later identified as Flavio Aragon, when they saw him holding what appeared to be a clear plastic bag with rock cocaine, Detective Mike Schwehr said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1997 | ANGIE CHUANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The long-awaited start of demolition on the Pico-Aliso public housing project in Boyle Heights began with a roar of bulldozers Thursday morning while public officials spoke before television news cameras of their visions of a new community. But alongside the ceremonial leveling of a three-unit building near Pecan and 4th streets, resident Isabel Guillen posed for a different camera.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1996 | GEORGE RAMOS
Thursday was supposed to mark a new beginning for the dilapidated Pico-Aliso public housing project in Boyle Heights, a collection of nondescript World War II-era apartment buildings in one of the most crime-ridden neighborhoods in Los Angeles. But as about 100 residents and dignitaries watched, a bulldozer poised to begin demolition work did not move.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2004 | Anna Gorman, Times Staff Writer
Instead of simply retelling the Easter story this year, one East Los Angeles housing project celebrated its own modern-day version Sunday of the tale of death and resurrection. The murder of 19-year-old Jesus Alejandro Hernandez last month brought new life to the residents of the Pico-Aliso housing project and prompted them to push for more security in their neighborhood. They held prayer services and news conferences and even fasted to pressure city officials to meet their demands.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1999 | GEORGE RAMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Los Angeles officials unveiled an ambitious plan a few years ago to renovate the decaying and gang-infested Pico Aliso public housing project, they said it wasn't just a job of laying bricks and mortar to reshape one of the toughest neighborhoods in L.A. It was billed as a $140-million roll of the dice that would be watched across the country as a prototype of how public housing projects could be transformed in the next century.
NEWS
May 26, 1996 | GEORGE RAMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A $50-million plan to rebuild a major portion of the aging, gang-plagued Pico-Aliso public housing project in Boyle Heights isn't just another construction job. According to some, it's a social experiment to try to turn around one of the toughest neighborhoods in Los Angeles--a roll of the dice for a part of town that hasn't had much luck. "It is more than just a housing project," said Xavier Mendoza, the man the Los Angeles Housing Authority has put in charge of the construction work.
NEWS
September 20, 1999 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Claudia Martinon's new home is only a block from her old apartment, in the same Boyle Heights public housing project where she has lived for seven years. But the beige and gray stucco townhouse seems like a world away. Broken pipes and loose cabinets plagued her apartment in the Pico Aliso project, 50-year-old barracks that are the largest public housing development west of the Mississippi. Martinon, her husband and their two daughters had no shower or doorbell.
NEWS
July 17, 1999 | GEORGE RAMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Los Angeles officials unveiled an ambitious plan a few years ago to renovate the decaying and gang-infested Pico Aliso public housing project, they said it wasn't just a job of laying bricks and mortar to reshape one of the toughest neighborhoods in L.A. It was billed as a $140-million roll of the dice that would be watched across the country as a prototype of how public housing projects could be transformed in the next century.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1997
The long-awaited demolition of the Pico-Aliso housing project began Thursday as a wrecking ball crashed into 16 of the 577 units that will be leveled in the first phase of a $50-million renovation. In January a brief ceremonial demolition was held, but Thursday's work marked the beginning of what authorities expect to be a five-month dismantling of the project. Last month, more than 40 residents protested what they view as forced displacement from their homes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1997
More than 40 residents of the Pico-Aliso housing project in Boyle Heights staged a demonstration Friday in front of the Housing Authority near MacArthur Park to protest what they view as forced displacement from their homes. The residents of the Eastside housing development, which is being torn down and rebuilt, complained that the housing authority pressured them into signing an amendment to their lease contract that does not guarantee them a unit in the new Pico-Aliso.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1997 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The detailed architectural drawings and optimistic pronouncements of the city Housing Authority promise a new future for Los Angeles' largest public housing project, a collection of fading apartments infamous as one of the city's toughest and most violent neighborhoods. After the rubble of Pico-Aliso in Boyle Heights is carted away, a new Pico-Aliso will rise and a "mixed community" of homeowners, renters and senior citizens will be established.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1997 | ANGIE CHUANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The long-awaited start of demolition on the Pico-Aliso public housing project in Boyle Heights began with a roar of bulldozers Thursday morning while public officials spoke before television news cameras of their visions of a new community. But alongside the ceremonial leveling of a three-unit building near Pecan and 4th streets, resident Isabel Guillen posed for a different camera.
NEWS
September 20, 1999 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Claudia Martinon's new home is only a block from her old apartment, in the same Boyle Heights public housing project where she has lived for seven years. But the beige and gray stucco townhouse seems like a world away. Broken pipes and loose cabinets plagued her apartment in the Pico Aliso project, 50-year-old barracks that are the largest public housing development west of the Mississippi. Martinon, her husband and their two daughters had no shower or doorbell.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1996 | GEORGE RAMOS
Thursday was supposed to mark a new beginning for the dilapidated Pico-Aliso public housing project in Boyle Heights, a collection of nondescript World War II-era apartment buildings in one of the most crime-ridden neighborhoods in Los Angeles. But as about 100 residents and dignitaries watched, a bulldozer poised to begin demolition work did not move.
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