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January 17, 2014 | By Leah Ollman
In one of Andrew Moore's inexhaustible photographs of Cuba, at Couturier, we face a courtyard lined with rows of silver chairs, their filigreed backs like a slightly chaotic jewelry display, a shiny jumble of upended pendants. At the far side of the courtyard is a building that proposes architecture as an act of whimsical montage, a dynamic piecing together of old and new, function, decoration and metaphor. The outdoor space operates as a theater, which is also how most of Moore's photographs feel, like naturalist stages where life is played out with heightened color and concentrated emotion.
February 13, 2014 | By Leah Ollman
Ron Jude's "Lick Creek Line" is an essay in the less common sense of the term: an attempt, or effort. It doesn't build an argument or deliver much in the way of information to do so, but instead issues impressions, propositions toward a loose understanding of its ostensible subject, a fur-trapper in rural Idaho. The constellations of color photographs accumulate a kind of emotional heft, though more so in book form, as originally conceived, than on the wall, as at Gallery Luisotti, where the project is too abbreviated to grab hold.
January 17, 1993
The James T. Yenckel column on handling travel problems was invaluable ("How to Complain in a Way That Gets Results," Dec. 27). I'd like to relate an experience that may be of interest. During our first tour of Italy a few years ago, my sister and I found ourselves in a hotel room that was not acceptable. So we snapped pictures of the shower that we couldn't reach or use, inadequate towels, scanty carpeting, etc. Upon our return to Los Angeles, we submitted the data to American Express and without further ado, we received a fair return on our expenses.
December 10, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Less than a week after being ditched by Instagram, Twitter has updated its mobile apps and added photo filters. The San Francisco-based social network announced that users will be able to edit and add pictures to the photos they post through their iPhone or Android Twitter apps starting Monday via app updates. "As one of the most compelling forms of self-expression, photos have long been an important part of these experiences," Twitter said in a Monday blog post announcing the news.
What do plumbing trucks have in common with milk cartons? Helping find missing children, at least some of them. A few months ago, Norm Wigginton and Rebecca Gold of Wigginton's Plumbing in Sylmar put three blown-up pictures of missing children on the sides of three of their business trucks so the photographs could be seen in the Southern California neighborhoods the trucks serve.
February 12, 1985 | GLENN BURKINS, Times Staff Writer
In an emotional pretrial hearing Monday, murder suspect David Allen Lucas came face to face with a Seattle woman who identified him as the man who abducted her and who she believes slashed her throat June 9. Jody Santiago, 30, the only woman to survive one of the four attacks with which Lucas is charged, told the court she is sure beyond any doubt that Lucas is the man who abducted her as she walked from an El Cajon nightclub.
August 21, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Yo, Apple rumor mill followers: Stop obsessing over how many pins will be in the new dock connector of the iPhone 5, where the microphone will be located, and how much bigger the screen will be and prepare to laugh at yourself. On Monday, New York comedian Adam Sacks uploaded a video to YouTube with the tantalizing title “LEAKED  Official Apple iPhone 5 Promo Video- Keynote 2012.” Sounds too good to be true, right? Well, it is. The video is not real, but that doesn't mean it's not funny.
February 16, 1986 | ZAN DUBIN
It's only fitting that the woman who indexed and catalogued Life magazine's photographs for over 35 years has a vivid memory of the day she decided to spend her life looking at pictures. "One fall day when I was in the second grade, my teacher, Miss Clark, was showing us pictures associated with autumn--like pumpkins, turkeys and football games," recalled Doris O'Neil, director of Vintage Prints for Time Inc. and former head of the Life Picture Collection.
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