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Pierre S Iv Du Pont

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NEWS
January 13, 1988 | FRANK CLIFFORD, Times Staff Writer
Is New Hampshire a conservative state? Does the sun rise in the east? Yes, but tell that to Republican presidential hopefuls Jack Kemp, Pat Robertson and Pierre S. (Pete) du Pont IV, the three candidates furthest to the right in 1988, and the three who, along with Alexander M. Haig Jr., have the furthest to go to win their party's primary here.
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NEWS
February 19, 1988 | DAVID LAUTER and BOB SECTER, Times Staff Writers
Democrat Bruce Babbitt and Republican Pierre S. (Pete) du Pont IV, two former governors who campaigned as outsiders willing to challenge their parties' orthodoxies, dropped out of the presidential race Thursday. Neither endorsed another candidate for now. In analyzing his defeat, Babbitt provided an epitaph that could apply to either campaign.
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NEWS
August 26, 1987 | Associated Press
Former Delaware Gov. Pierre S. (Pete) du Pont IV has won Federal Election Commission certification to receive federal matching funds in his race for the Republican presidential nomination. The commission announcement Monday made Du Pont the seventh 1988 presidential contender to be certified for the federal funds. The money comes from the voluntary $1 checkoff on individual income tax returns. To qualify, a candidate must raise $5,000 in each of 20 states in contributions of $250 or less.
NEWS
January 17, 1988 | Associated Press
Former Delaware Gov. Pierre S. (Pete) du Pont IV asked Saturday that his name be pulled off the Texas Republican primary ballot, saying his presidential campaign was a victim of "a nasty fraud" involving forged signatures on petitions. A top Texas GOP official said that it was too late to remove Du Pont's name and that any votes he receives would be designated as uncommitted.
NEWS
June 17, 1987 | ROBERT SHOGAN, Times Political Writer
Addressing mayors of the nation's financially pressed cities, GOP presidential contender Pat Robertson on Tuesday proposed a 10% income tax credit for contributions to "officially authorized" urban projects. The television evangelist told the U.S. Conference of Mayors that his proposal to help the cities meet their needs at a time of federal aid cutbacks would give citizens and businesses who contributed "a new sense of pride" in the projects they backed.
NEWS
June 1, 1987 | ROBERT SHOGAN, Times Political Writer
Before launching into his pitch for support for his long-shot presidential candidacy at the Midwestern Republican leadership conference this weekend, former Secretary of State Alexander M. Haig Jr. made a point of introducing his wife, Pat. "Like my American Express card," he said slyly, "I never leave home without her these days."
NEWS
November 9, 1987 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, Times Staff Writer
A few days after the Oct. 19 stock market crash, House Minority Leader Robert H. Michel (R-Ill.) emerged from a hurried meeting with President Reagan and paused in the White House driveway to chat with reporters about how to reassure investors. The bulls who hope for a market rebound "don't want any protectionism or any restraints on trade," Michel said.
NEWS
September 21, 1987 | FRANK CLIFFORD, Times Staff Writer
Wasting no time in making the proposed nuclear arms treaty a major bone of contention among Republicans running for President, the three most conservative candidates and the one with the most military experience expressed strong reservations here over the weekend about the tentative agreement announced Friday by the United States and the Soviet Union. "I regret more deeply than I can express that the . . . agreement is seriously flawed," said Alexander M. Haig Jr.
NEWS
May 17, 1987 | ROBERT SHOGAN, Times Political Writer
Short, bespectacled and a bit jug-eared, Democratic Sen. Paul Simon of Illinois is quick to admit that he scarcely fits the ideal of presidential appearance. Unkind critics even jeer that Simon, with his bow ties, resembles television comic Peewee Herman.
NEWS
February 19, 1988 | DAVID LAUTER and BOB SECTER, Times Staff Writers
Democrat Bruce Babbitt and Republican Pierre S. (Pete) du Pont IV, two former governors who campaigned as outsiders willing to challenge their parties' orthodoxies, dropped out of the presidential race Thursday. Neither endorsed another candidate for now. In analyzing his defeat, Babbitt provided an epitaph that could apply to either campaign.
NEWS
January 13, 1988 | FRANK CLIFFORD, Times Staff Writer
Is New Hampshire a conservative state? Does the sun rise in the east? Yes, but tell that to Republican presidential hopefuls Jack Kemp, Pat Robertson and Pierre S. (Pete) du Pont IV, the three candidates furthest to the right in 1988, and the three who, along with Alexander M. Haig Jr., have the furthest to go to win their party's primary here.
NEWS
December 3, 1987 | From Associated Press
Republican presidential hopeful Pierre S. (Pete) du Pont IV has won the coveted endorsement of the Union Leader, New Hampshire's only statewide daily newspaper and long a force in GOP state politics. "It is no secret that this newspaper has not been a flag-waving enthusiast for any of the candidates running for President," Publisher Nackey Loeb said in a front-page editorial this week. "A lot of the conservatives are in the same boat," she said.
NEWS
November 9, 1987 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, Times Staff Writer
A few days after the Oct. 19 stock market crash, House Minority Leader Robert H. Michel (R-Ill.) emerged from a hurried meeting with President Reagan and paused in the White House driveway to chat with reporters about how to reassure investors. The bulls who hope for a market rebound "don't want any protectionism or any restraints on trade," Michel said.
NEWS
November 2, 1987 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
Former Arizona Gov. Bruce Babbitt remembers the recent day when his fifth-grade son came home from school with an assignment to write an essay about AIDS. "He turned to me and he said, 'Daddy, what's a condom?' " Babbitt recalled. "It's lucky he came to me and not the President. Otherwise he'd still be waiting to find out."
NEWS
October 31, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Republican presidential candidate Pierre S. (Pete) du Pont IV stepped up his attack on Vice President George Bush Friday, suggesting that Bush is "out of touch" on the issue of Social Security and is the candidate of the status quo. During a GOP debate Wednesday, Bush called Du Pont's plan for a voluntary alternative to Social Security "nutty."
NEWS
October 19, 1987 | TOM REDBURN, Times Staff Writer
When Sen. Sam Nunn (D-Ga.) announced this summer that he would not run for President, he told several intimates that one reason was the danger that President Reagan's successor would be dragged down by a major economic disaster created by the last six years of gaping federal deficits. "Someone will have to be Herbert Hoover," Nunn mused privately, "before there can be another Franklin Roosevelt."
NEWS
July 13, 1987 | FRANK CLIFFORD, Times Staff Writer
For the better part of two months, Republican presidential candidate Pierre S. (Pete) du Pont IV, a tweedy heir to the chemical company fortune, has been crisscrossing Iowa trying to convince the state's downtrodden farmers, 14,000 of whom have gone bankrupt, that agricultural subsidies are bad for them.
NEWS
September 27, 1987 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
None of this year's Republican presidential hopefuls stand as squarely against arms control agreements with the Soviets as the right wing of their party, nor as forcefully in favor of increased military spending as President Reagan, a Times survey of the major presidential aspirants shows.
NEWS
October 11, 1987 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
For the 12 major candidates running for the Republican and Democratic presidential nominations, the question of whether the United States should aid Nicaragua's contras is an easy one. Every Republican says yes and every Democrat says no. But in written responses to a series of questions from The Times, all the candidates of both parties agreed on one aspect of Central American policy: None was willing to forswear the use of military force in Nicaragua.
NEWS
September 27, 1987 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
None of this year's Republican presidential hopefuls stand as squarely against arms control agreements with the Soviets as the right wing of their party, nor as forcefully in favor of increased military spending as President Reagan, a Times survey of the major presidential aspirants shows.
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