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Pig N Whistle Restaurant

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MAGAZINE
October 24, 1999 | Ed Leibowitz
Since 1927, from their sculpted perches not 15 feet above Hollywood Boulevard, the two cheerful swine with classical flutes have played and danced their duet of mute endurance. When this crown jewel of the bygone Pig'n Whistle restaurant chain closed down after World War II, the pigs still danced. After Carmen Miceli rescued porcine- and woodwind-themed benches for his Italian restaurant around the corner, they still smiled.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 20, 2001 | MARIA ELENA FERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirty minutes into their first date and Matt McCarthy and Rachelle Roxborough are already horizontal--in bed, shoes kicked off, reclining on pillows, drinking martinis. Ah, this is how all romances should begin, muses McCarthy, 35. Here in this dimly lit room with flowing, sheer curtains and vibrant green plants; on this queen-size canopy bed, with a delicious dessert platter for two, and a pretty young thing for company. Perfection.
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NEWS
May 20, 2001 | MARIA ELENA FERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirty minutes into their first date and Matt McCarthy and Rachelle Roxborough are already horizontal--in bed, shoes kicked off, reclining on pillows, drinking martinis. Ah, this is how all romances should begin, muses McCarthy, 35. Here in this dimly lit room with flowing, sheer curtains and vibrant green plants; on this queen-size canopy bed, with a delicious dessert platter for two, and a pretty young thing for company. Perfection.
MAGAZINE
October 24, 1999 | Ed Leibowitz
Since 1927, from their sculpted perches not 15 feet above Hollywood Boulevard, the two cheerful swine with classical flutes have played and danced their duet of mute endurance. When this crown jewel of the bygone Pig'n Whistle restaurant chain closed down after World War II, the pigs still danced. After Carmen Miceli rescued porcine- and woodwind-themed benches for his Italian restaurant around the corner, they still smiled.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2007
Spencer Davis, Stephen Bishop and the '60s cover band the Ravers will perform Sunday at a music event sponsored by the Mods & Rockers Festival to celebrate the holiday season and pay tribute to the late Beatles John Lennon and George Harrison. "A Very British Sixties Christmas" will be held from 8 to 11 p.m. at the Pig 'n' Whistle restaurant and bar at 6714 Hollywood Blvd. Admission is $3 at the door; there are no age restrictions.
MAGAZINE
June 27, 2004 | MICHAEL T. JARVIS
Forget stamps, coins and Beanie Babies. The Fullerton Museum Center's current exhibit, "Gotta Have It Too: Collecting in the Internet Age," revels in how weird it can get out there in the world of the fanatical collector. Hamburger presses, paint-by-number canvases, PEZ candy, memorabilia from L.A.'s original Pig'n Whistle restaurant aren't even the half of it. This cascade of tchotchkes isn't just demented. It's, like, culturally significant.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2012 | By Margaret Gray
I was going to refer to “It Is Done,” a play by Alex Goldberg currently running in a back room in Hollywood's Pig 'N Whistle restaurant, as “site-specific,” but then I Googled the term. Yes, “It Is Done” is set in a bar, but not the Pig 'N Whistle, nor the Mean Fiddler Bar & Grill in New York, where it premiered in 2011 -- just a nameless, deserted dive. Any bar would do. So according to Wikipedia, the proper term is “site-generic.” But that's terrible. So I propose “stage-free dinner theater.” You're welcome.
NEWS
January 8, 2004 | Shana Ting Lipton, Special to The Times
Dec. 22, 2003, 3:45 p.m., Borders Books & Music, Hollywood -- A striking scissors-toting man in a cowboy hat is escorted out of the ladies' room by two bookstore employees. An attractive brunet in her 20s, clad in a black salon cape, trails sheepishly behind him. Guerrilla hairdresser Kanu Saul has once again been busted. The only evidence he leaves behind is a small, neat pile of locks on the bathroom floor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2004 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
In a downtown dedicated to commerce during the boom years of the 1920s, the notion of a building devoted exclusively to the arts must have caused some astonishment. And yet there it was -- the Fine Arts Building, designed in 1926 by architects Albert R. Walker and Percy A. Eisen, who also created such well-known structures as the Oviatt Building downtown, the Regent Beverly Wilshire Hotel in Beverly Hills and the El Cortez Hotel in San Diego.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
When Emma Thompson was 14, her father brought the family to Los Angeles for two weeks while he was directing the play "The Norman Conquests" at the Ahmanson Theatre. Thompson vividly recalls going to Grauman's and seeing the Hollywood Walk of Fame. It is now, to say the least, utterly surreal to her that some 37 years later, she has her own sidewalk star, right in front of the Pig 'n Whistle restaurant. "I've got the star of Eve Arden somewhere near me, James Cameron and Yehudi Menuhin," she says, laughing, just a day after the ceremony.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 1999 | PAUL IORIO
In "Chinatown," Los Angeles' Chinatown is more of a metaphor than a place, until the end of the movie, when it becomes an all-too-real location. "Chinatown is a pretty good metaphor for the futility of good intentions," says the film's screenwriter, Robert Towne. "[Police officers in the film] are told to do as little as possible in Chinatown in the way of law enforcement because you never know whether you're helping to avert a crime or helping to commit one."
BUSINESS
June 14, 2001 | MORRIS NEWMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Developer Robert A. Langer has a plan for the historic Broadway building at Hollywood Boulevard and Vine Street: He wants to make the nine-story tower look much as it did in 1927, when it was new. In the next year, workers will remove the stucco from the lower floors of the Beaux Arts Classical-style building. The classical columns of the front facade, long hidden, will again see daylight.
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