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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2013 | By Kate Mather and Shelby Grad
An intern at the National Transportation Safety Board confirmed to a Bay Area television station fake, racially insensitive names of the pilots flying the ill-fated Asiana Airlines Flight 214 . The segment on Friday at noon that referred to two of the pilots as "Captain Sum Ting Wong," and "Wi Tu Lo," has gone viral and drawn heavy criticism on the Internet. Late Friday, the NTSB apologized for the incident . "Earlier today, in response to an inquiry from a media outlet, a summer intern acted outside the scope of his authority when he erroneously confirmed the names of the flight crew on the aircraft," the NTSB said in a statement.
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NEWS
June 23, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Southwest Airlines flight attendants are considering a federal discrimination claim against a pilot whose cockpit rant about "gays and grannies and grandes" on his flight crew was accidentally broadcast to the control tower and other planes in the airspace over Texas. The incident happened on a March 25 flight from Austin to San Diego but was only made public Tuesday when KPRC-TV inHouston obtained the cockpit conversation and posted it on its website. Here is a link to the TV station's audio clip and a caution: Although some of the language has been "bleeped" out, there is other inappropriate and offensive language that is audible.
NATIONAL
March 28, 2012 | Tina Susman
A Jet Blue pilot who began ranting and acting erratically as his flight headed from New York to Las Vegas -- forcing the co-pilot to lock him out of the cockpit and make an emergency landing -- has been described as a seemingly content family man who once hoped to be an astronaut. Jet Blue identified the pilot as Clayton Osbon, who lives in Georgia but who maintains an apartment in the New York City borough of Queens because his flying base is New York. In a statement Tuesday night , it said that the captain of Flight 191 was receiving medical treatment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2013 | By Kate Mather and Rong-Gong Lin II
The broadcast Friday by a Bay Area television station of fake, racially insensitive names of the pilots flying the ill-fated Asiana Airlines Flight 214 has sparked outrage. The segment on Friday at noon that referred to two of the pilots as "Captain Sum Ting Wong," and "Wi Tu Lo," has gone viral and drawn heavy criticism on the Internet. In a statement read on KTVU-TV on Friday night, anchor Frank Somerville said the station made several mistakes. Somerville did not say how exactly the station got the names.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Paul Giamatti will be playing 1980s-era private detective Hoke Moseley if the pilot he's shooting for FX gets ordered to series. FX announced Wednesday that Giamatti would be starring in the pilot "Hoke," a "darkly comic drama" based on the detective novels of Charles Willeford. The pilot, written and directed by Scott Frank, follows Moseley as he undergoes a midlife crisis and gets involved in a murder investigation. He might also be insane. VIDEO: Summer 2013 TV preview Comparing Willeford to Elmore Leonard, FX president of original programming Eric Schrier said, "Charles Willeford is one of the most deeply respected writers of crime fiction and he created a wholly original and colorful lead character in Detective Hoke Moseley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2013 | By Laura J. Nelson
Officials are investigating whether the pilot of the Asiana Airlines jet that crashed into the runway at San Francisco International Airport on Saturday had been blinded seconds before by a flash of light. The pilot flying the plane, a veteran captain still in training on the Boeing 777, reportedly told Korean investigators that a bright flash temporarily blinded him at an altitude of about 500 feet. National Transportation Safety Board director Deborah A.P. Hersman said pilot Lee Kang-kook shared "some of that information" with the U.S. investigators interviewing the pilots.
NATIONAL
February 1, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
As 13 wildfires ripped across Arkansas on Friday, state forestry pilot Jacob Thomas Harrell took a small plane out to look for additional hot spots. Late Saturday, search crews still had not found any sign of either Harrell or the single-engine Cessna 210 Centurion since his last radio call more than 30 hours earlier. “We are going to be here until we find Jake,” State Forester Joe Fox said in a statement released Saturday evening. “Tonight and tomorrow's efforts are already planned and we are aggressively covering as much ground as quickly and safely as possible.” Two planes, a helicopter and a number of people from state, local and federal agencies have been involved in the nonstop search, the Arkansas Forestry Commission said.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2014 | By Scott Collins
The process of making TV pilots every year may be a relic of the pre-Netflix era - but CBS isn't going to abandon it any time soon. "Pilot season does work for us," CBS entertainment president Nina Tassler told reporters Wednesday morning at the TV press tour in Pasadena. "It's not perfect ... it certainly is a very difficult time …. [but] it's also exciting. " Tassler said the "creative adrenaline" of pilot season had led to such hits as "The Big Bang Theory" and "CSI: Crime Scene Investigation.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2013 | By Yvonne Villarreal
Fox has officially ordered the pilot for "Fatrick," which is backed by a hefty comedy lineup. The show is written by "Dont Trust the B---- in Apt 23" creator  Nahnatchka Khan and Corey Nickerson (co-executive producer of "Apt 23", "The Crazy Ones") and directed by Oscar winners Nat Faxon and Jim Rash ("The Descendants," "The Way Way Back"). The four will also executive-produce the series. FALL TV 2013: Watch the trailers The network had made a pilot production commitment in August to the project.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2013 | By Yvonne Villarreal
NBC can't shake its Maya Rudolph infatuation. The peacock network has ordered a pilot for a new prime-time variety series that will feature the "Saturday Night Live" graduate as its topliner, the network confirmed. It's a project Rudolph had been pushing for months after the cancellation of vexed comedy "Up All Night," in which she was a key cast member. PHOTOS: Behind the scenes of movies and TV The variety show pairs Rudolph with an old boss once more. She will serve as executive producer along with "SNL" mastermind and "Up All Night" producer Lorne Michaels -- as well as Erin David ("Up All Night")
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