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BUSINESS
January 26, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
The Navy's new drone being tested near Chesapeake Bay stretches the boundaries of technology: It's designed to land on the deck of an aircraft carrier, one of aviation's most difficult maneuvers. What's even more remarkable is that it will do that not only without a pilot in the cockpit, but without a pilot at all. The X-47B marks a paradigm shift in warfare, one that is likely to have far-reaching consequences. With the drone's ability to be flown autonomously by onboard computers, it could usher in an era when death and destruction can be dealt by machines operating semi-independently.
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NATIONAL
February 1, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
As 13 wildfires ripped across Arkansas on Friday, state forestry pilot Jacob Thomas Harrell took a small plane out to look for additional hot spots. Late Saturday, search crews still had not found any sign of either Harrell or the single-engine Cessna 210 Centurion since his last radio call more than 30 hours earlier. “We are going to be here until we find Jake,” State Forester Joe Fox said in a statement released Saturday evening. “Tonight and tomorrow's efforts are already planned and we are aggressively covering as much ground as quickly and safely as possible.” Two planes, a helicopter and a number of people from state, local and federal agencies have been involved in the nonstop search, the Arkansas Forestry Commission said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2014 | By Tony Perry
The pilot killed in the crash of an F/A-18C Hornet in northern Nevada was identified Saturday as Marine Capt. Reid Nannen. Nannen, 32, of Hopedale, Ill., was killed March 1 when the plane crashed 70 miles east of the Naval Air Station at Fallon, Nev. He was a student at the TopGun school there. Nannen's permanent assignment was at the Marine Corps Air Station in Iwakuni, Japan, and he had twice deployed to Afghanistan during his 10-year career. The cause of the crash is under investigation.
WORLD
October 9, 2013 | By Alexandra Zavis
A passenger landed a plane at Humberside Airport in Britain after the pilot collapsed at the controls, according to news reports. The two were the only people on board the four-seater Cessna 172 when the pilot became ill Tuesday evening as they headed back to Sandtoft Airfield, near the northeastern town of Doncaster, Reuters news agency reported. John Wildey told the British Broadcasting Corp . that he had never flown a plane when he grabbed the controls from the pilot and called “Mayday, mayday, mayday.” “I hadn't a clue what to do to get down,” he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2013 | By Meg James
Paramount Pictures is easing back into television production with a high-profile pilot: "Beverly Hills Cop. " The Viacom Inc.-owned movie studio announced Monday that it was co-producing and co-financing a one-hour pilot, "Beverly Hills Cop," with Sony Pictures Television. The CBS broadcast network ordered the pilot from Sony, which has taken the lead role developing and producing the project. Paramount owns the rights to the franchise, which produced a successful string of movies in the 1980s and '90s starring Eddie Murphy.
WORLD
March 16, 2014 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING - The search for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 has expanded to cover an impossibly vast swath of Asia extending from Kazakhstan to Australia, with Malaysia appealing for as many airplanes and ships as the world can provide. The countries where the Boeing 777 and the 239 people aboard could have gone, based on a signal picked up by a satellite, stretch north and west from the plane's last known location and include Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Pakistan, Bangladesh, India, China, Myanmar, Laos, Vietnam and Thailand.
NEWS
June 23, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Southwest Airlines flight attendants are considering a federal discrimination claim against a pilot whose cockpit rant about "gays and grannies and grandes" on his flight crew was accidentally broadcast to the control tower and other planes in the airspace over Texas. The incident happened on a March 25 flight from Austin to San Diego but was only made public Tuesday when KPRC-TV inHouston obtained the cockpit conversation and posted it on its website. Here is a link to the TV station's audio clip and a caution: Although some of the language has been "bleeped" out, there is other inappropriate and offensive language that is audible.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2014 | By Scott Collins
The process of making TV pilots every year may be a relic of the pre-Netflix era - but CBS isn't going to abandon it any time soon. "Pilot season does work for us," CBS entertainment president Nina Tassler told reporters Wednesday morning at the TV press tour in Pasadena. "It's not perfect ... it certainly is a very difficult time …. [but] it's also exciting. " Tassler said the "creative adrenaline" of pilot season had led to such hits as "The Big Bang Theory" and "CSI: Crime Scene Investigation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2013 | By Kate Mather and Rong-Gong Lin II
The broadcast Friday by a Bay Area television station of fake, racially insensitive names of the pilots flying the ill-fated Asiana Airlines Flight 214 has sparked outrage. The segment on Friday at noon that referred to two of the pilots as "Captain Sum Ting Wong," and "Wi Tu Lo," has gone viral and drawn heavy criticism on the Internet. In a statement read on KTVU-TV on Friday night, anchor Frank Somerville said the station made several mistakes. Somerville did not say how exactly the station got the names.
NATIONAL
May 18, 2012 | By Dalina Castellanos
The latest in a string of bizarre events involving air travel -- and in some cases, flight crews -- comes in the form of a loaded gun. At the center of this incident, which involved a .357 Magnum, was a pilot for Piedmont Airlines. The pilot was detained and charged Friday for allegedly trying to board a flight in Buffalo for New York City with a loaded revolver in his bag, the Associated Press reported . Brett Dieter, 52, of Virginia was charged with the possession of a concealed firearm when a Transportation Security Administration agent noticed a .357 Magnum loaded with five rounds of ammunition in his bag at Buffalo Niagara International Airport, according to the Buffalo News . A spokesman for US Airways, which contracts with Piedmont for its US Airways Express fleet, told the Los Angeles Times that the company would conduct an internal investigation and referred all other questions to Buffalo law enforcement.
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