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NATIONAL
May 18, 2012 | By Dalina Castellanos
The latest in a string of bizarre events involving air travel -- and in some cases, flight crews -- comes in the form of a loaded gun. At the center of this incident, which involved a .357 Magnum, was a pilot for Piedmont Airlines. The pilot was detained and charged Friday for allegedly trying to board a flight in Buffalo for New York City with a loaded revolver in his bag, the Associated Press reported . Brett Dieter, 52, of Virginia was charged with the possession of a concealed firearm when a Transportation Security Administration agent noticed a .357 Magnum loaded with five rounds of ammunition in his bag at Buffalo Niagara International Airport, according to the Buffalo News . A spokesman for US Airways, which contracts with Piedmont for its US Airways Express fleet, told the Los Angeles Times that the company would conduct an internal investigation and referred all other questions to Buffalo law enforcement.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2013 | By Laura J. Nelson
Officials are investigating whether the pilot of the Asiana Airlines jet that crashed into the runway at San Francisco International Airport on Saturday had been blinded seconds before by a flash of light. The pilot flying the plane, a veteran captain still in training on the Boeing 777, reportedly told Korean investigators that a bright flash temporarily blinded him at an altitude of about 500 feet. National Transportation Safety Board director Deborah A.P. Hersman said pilot Lee Kang-kook shared "some of that information" with the U.S. investigators interviewing the pilots.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2013 | By Kate Mather and Shelby Grad
An intern at the National Transportation Safety Board confirmed to a Bay Area television station fake, racially insensitive names of the pilots flying the ill-fated Asiana Airlines Flight 214 . The segment on Friday at noon that referred to two of the pilots as "Captain Sum Ting Wong," and "Wi Tu Lo," has gone viral and drawn heavy criticism on the Internet. Late Friday, the NTSB apologized for the incident . "Earlier today, in response to an inquiry from a media outlet, a summer intern acted outside the scope of his authority when he erroneously confirmed the names of the flight crew on the aircraft," the NTSB said in a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2014 | By Scott Collins
The process of making TV pilots every year may be a relic of the pre-Netflix era - but CBS isn't going to abandon it any time soon. "Pilot season does work for us," CBS entertainment president Nina Tassler told reporters Wednesday morning at the TV press tour in Pasadena. "It's not perfect ... it certainly is a very difficult time …. [but] it's also exciting. " Tassler said the "creative adrenaline" of pilot season had led to such hits as "The Big Bang Theory" and "CSI: Crime Scene Investigation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2013 | By Kate Mather and Rong-Gong Lin II
The broadcast Friday by a Bay Area television station of fake, racially insensitive names of the pilots flying the ill-fated Asiana Airlines Flight 214 has sparked outrage. The segment on Friday at noon that referred to two of the pilots as "Captain Sum Ting Wong," and "Wi Tu Lo," has gone viral and drawn heavy criticism on the Internet. In a statement read on KTVU-TV on Friday night, anchor Frank Somerville said the station made several mistakes. Somerville did not say how exactly the station got the names.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2013 | By Yvonne Villarreal
Fox has officially ordered the pilot for "Fatrick," which is backed by a hefty comedy lineup. The show is written by "Dont Trust the B---- in Apt 23" creator  Nahnatchka Khan and Corey Nickerson (co-executive producer of "Apt 23", "The Crazy Ones") and directed by Oscar winners Nat Faxon and Jim Rash ("The Descendants," "The Way Way Back"). The four will also executive-produce the series. FALL TV 2013: Watch the trailers The network had made a pilot production commitment in August to the project.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2013 | By Yvonne Villarreal
NBC can't shake its Maya Rudolph infatuation. The peacock network has ordered a pilot for a new prime-time variety series that will feature the "Saturday Night Live" graduate as its topliner, the network confirmed. It's a project Rudolph had been pushing for months after the cancellation of vexed comedy "Up All Night," in which she was a key cast member. PHOTOS: Behind the scenes of movies and TV The variety show pairs Rudolph with an old boss once more. She will serve as executive producer along with "SNL" mastermind and "Up All Night" producer Lorne Michaels -- as well as Erin David ("Up All Night")
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Paul Giamatti will be playing 1980s-era private detective Hoke Moseley if the pilot he's shooting for FX gets ordered to series. FX announced Wednesday that Giamatti would be starring in the pilot "Hoke," a "darkly comic drama" based on the detective novels of Charles Willeford. The pilot, written and directed by Scott Frank, follows Moseley as he undergoes a midlife crisis and gets involved in a murder investigation. He might also be insane. VIDEO: Summer 2013 TV preview Comparing Willeford to Elmore Leonard, FX president of original programming Eric Schrier said, "Charles Willeford is one of the most deeply respected writers of crime fiction and he created a wholly original and colorful lead character in Detective Hoke Moseley.
BUSINESS
January 26, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
The Navy's new drone being tested near Chesapeake Bay stretches the boundaries of technology: It's designed to land on the deck of an aircraft carrier, one of aviation's most difficult maneuvers. What's even more remarkable is that it will do that not only without a pilot in the cockpit, but without a pilot at all. The X-47B marks a paradigm shift in warfare, one that is likely to have far-reaching consequences. With the drone's ability to be flown autonomously by onboard computers, it could usher in an era when death and destruction can be dealt by machines operating semi-independently.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2010 | Steve Harvey
On May 9, 1957, Air Force Lt. David Steeves, piloting a T-33 training jet, took off from Hamilton Air Force Base, near San Francisco, on a flight to Arizona. Then, like a character in the television show the "Twilight Zone," he disappeared. Days passed, then weeks. When no trace of Steeves or the plane was found, the Air Force declared the 23-year-old pilot officially dead. But, 54 days after he vanished, a gaunt, bearded Steeves, filthy clothing hanging from his body, hobbled into a camp in the remote backcountry of Kings Canyon National Park, east of Fresno.
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