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Pilot

NATIONAL
April 19, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
U.S. Coast Guard  and Navy forces have been dispatched to the scene of a plane crash off the coast of Florida. So far there is no word about the fate of the pilot believed to have become incapacitated at the controls. The small aircraft circled aimlessly in the skies for hours over the Gulf of Mexico as anxious air traffic controllers watched helplessly. Air traffic controllers apparently tried for hours to make contact with the pilot, but all attempts failed, pointing to the likelihood that the pilot had perhaps fallen unconscious at the controls, or perhaps suffered a heart attack.  FlightAware.com released the above image of the path of the plane, including the erratic and repetitive circular patterns it made over the Gulf of Mexico.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1985 | United Press International
A U.S. Marine pilot safely ejected Monday from his A-4 Skyhawk jet that crashed while on a routine training mission about 43 miles northwest of Yuma, a Marine spokesman said. The cause of the crash was under investigation.
NEWS
July 8, 1986 | United Press International
A helicopter flipped over the side of a tuna boat and crashed into the ocean as it tried to take off from the boat's deck Monday, killing the pilot and seriously injuring a passenger, a Coast Guard spokesman said.
NATIONAL
June 8, 2012 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON - Fifty-two years after his U-2 spy plane was shot down over the Soviet Union, famed Cold War pilot Francis Gary Powers will be posthumously awarded the Silver Star.  The medal will be presented by Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Norton Schwartz to Powers' grandson and granddaughter at a Pentagon ceremony attended by other family members next Friday. Powers, who died in 1977 at age 47 in a helicopter crash in Los Angeles, will be recognized for his "indomitable spirit, exceptional loyalty" and "sustained courage in an exceptionally hostile environment," according to the citation.
WORLD
November 8, 2008 | Times Wire Reports
A British pilot who was suddenly blinded by a stroke during a solo flight was talked safely down by a military pilot, the Royal Air Force said. Jim O'Neill, 65, asked for help after he went blind 40 minutes into a flight from Scotland to southeastern England last week. The BBC reported that O'Neill, flying a small Cessna aircraft, lost his sight 5,500 feet in the air. Wing Commander Paul Gerrard, who was finishing a training flight nearby, was drafted to help. He located the plane and began flying close by and radioing directions.
WORLD
February 8, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
A woman stormed into a cockpit over New Zealand today, stabbed both pilots and threatened to blow up the plane before she was subdued. The Air National flight landed safely at Christchurch and the 33-year-old woman was arrested, police said. None of the seven passengers were injured, but the pilot suffered a severely cut hand and the co-pilot was injured on the foot.
NATIONAL
April 3, 2012 | By Dalina Castellanos
Flight conditions were ideal as the Cessna twin-engine plane flew through the clouds above Sturgeon Bay, Wis. There was a very mild breeze, sunshine and clear skies, but inside the cockpit was another story, authorities said. The small plane's pilot, 81-year-old John Collins had fallen unconscious, leaving his wife, Helen Collins, 80, to take the controls Monday evening, Door County Sheriff Terry Vogel told The Times. At 5 p.m. authorities were dispatched to clear the streets as she prepared to land, Vogel said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 1994
In response to your editorial, "Averting Future Air Disasters" (Dec. 24): You state more than once that the Westwind jet was going too fast and that the pilot was "warned" of this several times by air traffic controllers. Your inference seems to be that the pilot of the Westwind was "speeding" and this was a negligent operation of the aircraft which contributed to the accident. Quite to the contrary, the Westwind pilot was operating his aircraft at a speed which he considered prudent for the circumstances.
NATIONAL
February 20, 2010 | By Richard Fausset
Where did all of Joe Stack's anger come from? That was the question Texas singer-songwriter Billy Eli has been turning over in his head in Birmingham, Ala., this week, where he has been recording songs and following the sad and vexing news about his old bass player and friend. Authorities believe that A. Joseph Stack, 53, burned down his house Thursday morning and then flew a plane into a building in Austin, Texas, in what an FBI official described Friday as an assault against the IRS. A person calling himself "Joe Stack" left an apparent suicide note on the Web. The anti-tax manifesto was replete with a sense of anguish and frustration at his financial setbacks, tax woes and difficulty finding work in Austin.
OPINION
October 21, 2005
Re "A Super Hornet's Nest," Column One, Oct. 19 As thrilled as I would have been to see Richard Webb's performance over San Luis Obispo, I think he demonstrated extremely poor judgment by buzzing a civil airport -- at high speed and low altitude -- with no coordination or communication with air traffic control. In a worst-case scenario, he could have collided with a business jet full of people, resulting in a dozen deaths and the loss of more than $100 million in aircraft, not to mention damage and injuries on the ground.
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