Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsPilot
IN THE NEWS

Pilot

OPINION
December 25, 2013 | Patt Morrison
Don't think that Gina Marie Lindsey is up in an ivory control tower. This week, the executive director of Los Angeles World Airports will be joining an estimated 2.6 million passengers in the Christmas/New Year's scrum at LAX, on her own holiday travels. In 2007, the woman who once ran Seattle's airport was appointed to run L.A.'s by Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa. In October, Mayor Eric Garcetti decided to keep Lindsey on to, in her words, "continue to push this" - Los Angeles International Airport - forward.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 2013 | By Dan Weikel
On the west side of Van Nuys Airport it's like World War II never ended. Vintage propeller planes once flown by U.S. Navy, Army Air Forces and Royal Air Force pilots are parked wingtip to wingtip along the taxiway. Nearby buildings are painted in camouflage. The sound of swing music sometimes drifts across the tarmac, and olive drab flight jackets are de rigueur. The planes and buildings belong to Condor Squadron, a nonprofit organization dedicated to honoring America's veterans and the public display of the North American AT-6/SNJ Texan - a sturdy two-seater that helped train tens of thousands of military pilots during World War II and the Korean War. The group and its members own eight of the planes, making Van Nuys the site of one of the largest collections of such aircraft in the nation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 2013 | Hailey Branson-Potts
For so many years, their service was largely forgotten. In the midst of World War II, with legions of male pilots overseas, the 1,102 young women comprising the Women Airforce Service Pilots flew more than 60 million miles domestically, test-flew repaired military aircraft and ferried non-flying male military officers around the country. But as the war neared its end and the men returned, their program was disbanded. Nearly 70 years later, with millions of people watching, their service will be celebrated in grand style with a float in the 125 t h Rose Parade on Jan. 1. WASPs from across the country have been raising money for the float and the trip to Pasadena for the reunion of a lifetime.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2013 | Steve Chawkins
The stunned Navy pilot was gripped in pain, blood was pouring down his face and a good part of his warplane was destroyed. But worst of all, Ensign Kenneth Schechter couldn't see. An enemy shell had smashed into his Skyraider and fragments pierced his eyes. Hurtling over the Korean coast at 200 mph, Schechter was suddenly enveloped in blackness. "I'm blind! For God's sake, help me!" he cried into his radio. "I'm blind!" FOR THE RECORD: Kenneth Schechter: A news obituary in the Dec. 22 California section on Kenneth Schechter, a former Navy pilot who flew 100 miles and landed safely despite being temporarily blinded by enemy fire, misstated the final rank of Howard Thayer, the Navy pilot who guided Schechter from another plane.
WORLD
December 16, 2013 | By Chris Kraul
BOGOTA, Colombia - U.S.-funded anti-coca spraying in Colombia has been suspended indefinitely in the aftermath of the shooting down, apparently by leftist rebels, of two spray planes and the death of one of the American pilots, sources confirmed Monday. One fumigation airplane was shot down Sept. 27, killing the pilot, whose name was not made public. A second crop-duster was brought down Oct. 5, prompting the U.S. Embassy in Bogota to suspend spraying, according to one well-informed source who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to talk to the press.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2013 | By Dan Weikel and Rich Simon
WASHINGTON - A daylong hearing Wednesday into the July 6 Asiana Airlines crash in San Francisco raised broad questions about the adequacy of pilot training  and deteriorating skill in an era of growing reliance on computer-controlled flight. Arriving from Seoul, Asiana Flight 214 struck a sea wall at San Francisco International Airport  and slammed onto the runway, severing its tail section and scattering wreckage across the airfield before the body of the plane erupted in flames.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2013 | By Dan Weikel and Rich Simon
WASHINGTON - The trainee captain flying the Asiana Airlines flight that slowed dangerously and crashed in San Francisco in July told investigators the approach to the landing was "very stressful" and he mistakenly thought an automatic throttle was controlling the plane's air speed. Lee Kang Kuk, 46, who was landing a Boeing 777 at San Francisco International Airport for the first time, also told National Transportation Safety Board officials that manually bringing the airliner down onto the runway was difficult because an airport guidance system for pilots was out of service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2013 | By Dan Weikel and Rich Simon
WASHINGTON -- The captain flying the Asiana Airlines flight that crashed in San Francisco in July told accident investigators the approach for landing was "very stressful" and he thought the plane's automatic throttle was always working, according to a federal report released Wednesday. Lee Kang Kuk, 46, who was landing at San Francisco International Airport for the first time, told National Transportation Safety Board officials in an interview the visual approach was difficult to perform in the large Boeing 777 because the runway's light system that helps guide pilots was out of service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 2013 | By Dan Weikel
Federal safety officials will hold an investigative hearing starting Tuesday to explore the Asiana Airlines crash in San Francisco that killed three passengers and injured more than 180 in July. On Tuesday and Wednesday in Washington, the National Transportation Safety Board will address issues related to the crash, including pilot training, the effect of highly automated flight systems on pilot awareness, aircraft cabin safety and the emergency response of public safety agencies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2013 | By Jason Wells
Federal aviation officials are investigating why the pilot of a small plane made an emergency hard landing Thursday at a park surrounded by single-family homes in Northern California. The single-engine craft was found on its belly in a soccer field in Phoenix Park in Fair Oaks just after 2:30 p.m. The local fire department told Fox 40 that the pilot was able to walk away from the hard landing with only minor injuries. The four-seat Piper Comanche  was Auburn-bound from Salinas, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|