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BUSINESS
July 3, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
China Eastern Airlines Corp., the Asian nation's third-largest carrier, canceled the licenses of some of the 13 pilots who aborted flights in southwestern Yunnan province earlier this year to protest work conditions. Some pilots were demoted and others' licenses were suspended, China Eastern said. Eight company officials also were punished for mismanagement because of the incidents, the statement said. A total of 21 flights from Yunnan returned to their departing airports March 31 and April 1 without flying to their destinations, affecting more than 1,000 passengers.
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NATIONAL
October 27, 2011 | By Brian Bennett, Washington Bureau
The Homeland Security Department is adding three surveillance drone aircraft to a domestic fleet chiefly used to patrol the border with Mexico even though officials acknowledge they don't have enough pilots to operate the seven Predators they already possess. The new drones are being purchased after lobbying by members of the so-called drone caucus in Congress, many from districts in Southern California, a major hub of the unmanned aircraft industry. "We didn't ask for them," said a Homeland Security official who spoke on condition of anonymity to speak frankly.
BUSINESS
September 7, 1998 | Reuters
Talks aimed at ending a 9-day-old strike by pilots at Northwest Airlines Corp. that has shut down the nation's fourth-largest airline were recessed for two days without a direct meeting between the two sides. Instead, labor and management met for two days alone and with federal mediators, who shuttled between conference rooms to determine if formal negotiations could resume. About 6,200 pilots struck Northwest, which is based in St. Paul, Minn., Aug.
NEWS
September 16, 2001 | LEIGH STROPE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
With terrorists now using aircraft as weapons, a union representing commercial airline pilots is advising its members to act aggressively when confronted by hijackers. Pilots have been taught in annual training sessions to cooperate with hijackers. But that was before Tuesday's terrorist attacks. "We've been guarding against the traditional hijacker who wanted the aircraft on the ground and his monetary or political demands met," said David Richards, a US Airways pilot from Charlotte, N.C.
WORLD
December 16, 2013 | By Chris Kraul
BOGOTA, Colombia - U.S.-funded anti-coca spraying in Colombia has been suspended indefinitely in the aftermath of the shooting down, apparently by leftist rebels, of two spray planes and the death of one of the American pilots, sources confirmed Monday. One fumigation airplane was shot down Sept. 27, killing the pilot, whose name was not made public. A second crop-duster was brought down Oct. 5, prompting the U.S. Embassy in Bogota to suspend spraying, according to one well-informed source who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to talk to the press.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2012 | By Dan Weikel and Ari Bloomekatz, Los Angeles Times
A small private plane carrying a load of marijuana strayed into President Obama's no-fly zone over Los Angeles on Thursday and was forced to land at Long Beach Airport after being intercepted by U.S. Air Force jet fighters, authorities said. The four-seat Cessna entered the restricted airspace about 11 a.m. as the president was flying from Orange County to Los Angeles aboard Marine One, a military helicopter provided for his use. Federal officials said the aircraft was never close enough to endanger Obama.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1997 | From Associated Press
American Airlines and its pilots passed up a chance Wednesday to have their contract dispute settled by an arbitrator, putting the nation's No. 2 carrier 30 days away from a possible strike. If no settlement is reached during the so-called cooling-off period, the pilots would be allowed to strike Feb. 15 and American would be free to impose the contract it wants. American's parent company, AMR Corp.
NATIONAL
February 20, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
The pilots of a UPS cargo jet killed in a crash in August had complained about the company's work schedules but also made mistakes shortly before the plane flew into a hillside and burst into flames, a National Transportation Safety Board investigative hearing was told Thursday. Flight 1354 was en route to Birmingham, Ala., from Louisville, Ky., a hub for the package delivery company. The pilots were completing their third flight since reporting to work the previous day in Illinois, according to information at the one-day hearing.
BUSINESS
June 15, 2001 | From Reuters
Delta Air Lines Inc.'s Comair and its 1,350 striking pilots reached a tentative contract agreement Thursday after three days of negotiations with federal mediators, company and union officials said. Details of the agreement were not released, but pilots have demanded pay and benefits more in line with packages offered by bigger airlines. The accord was facilitated by Transportation Secretary Norman Mineta. Cincinnati-based Comair has lost more than $200 million during the 12-week strike.
BUSINESS
September 30, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
Although American Airlines' parent company is still in bankruptcy and a merger with US Airways is on hold, the Fort Worth-based airline is moving forward with plans to grow. American Airlines announced Monday that it plans to recruit and hire 1,500 pilots over the next five years, with the job openings to be posted Oct. 1. The new pilots are in addition to the 1,500 new flight attendants and 1,200 agents the airline has begun to recruit this year. (Interested candidates are encouraged to visit aacareers.com .)
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