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NEWS
December 2, 2003
I am disappointed in Thomas Curwen's "Where Wings Meet the Wild" (Nov. 18). My husband, an experienced bush pilot for Arctic Circle Air and a non-drinker, was not in the story. Arctic Circle's reputation was tarnished. [Many] Alaskan bush pilots are ... respected family men. Janet Gray Bethel, Alaska
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NEWS
June 19, 2010
More than three decades after Air America's cover as the CIA's aviation wing in Southeast Asia was blown, former employees are telling more stories about the highs and lows of secret missions in dangerous places. By Jay Price, Raleigh News & Observer Arthur Cheek flew harrowing missions all over Vietnam, rescuing downed pilots, dropping off supplies and ferrying people to secret jobs in dangerous places. That wouldn't be odd except for one thing: Cheek, of Weaverville, N.C., was a civilian flying for a civilian company on missions that, in some cases, he still can't, or won't, talk about.
BUSINESS
June 9, 2001 | Bloomberg News
Delta Air Lines Inc.'s Comair commuter carrier and the union representing 1,400 striking pilots agreed to start 72 hours of talks Tuesday aimed at ending a walkout that began March 26. The agreement to hold the first talks since the union rejected a contract proposal May 12 came after the two sides met with Transportation Secretary Norman Y. Mineta. The members of the Air Line Pilots Assn. are striking over pay, benefits and work rules.
BUSINESS
July 3, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
China Eastern Airlines Corp., the Asian nation's third-largest carrier, canceled the licenses of some of the 13 pilots who aborted flights in southwestern Yunnan province earlier this year to protest work conditions. Some pilots were demoted and others' licenses were suspended, China Eastern said. Eight company officials also were punished for mismanagement because of the incidents, the statement said. A total of 21 flights from Yunnan returned to their departing airports March 31 and April 1 without flying to their destinations, affecting more than 1,000 passengers.
NEWS
September 16, 2001 | LEIGH STROPE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
With terrorists now using aircraft as weapons, a union representing commercial airline pilots is advising its members to act aggressively when confronted by hijackers. Pilots have been taught in annual training sessions to cooperate with hijackers. But that was before Tuesday's terrorist attacks. "We've been guarding against the traditional hijacker who wanted the aircraft on the ground and his monetary or political demands met," said David Richards, a US Airways pilot from Charlotte, N.C.
NATIONAL
February 20, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
The pilots of a UPS cargo jet killed in a crash in August had complained about the company's work schedules but also made mistakes shortly before the plane flew into a hillside and burst into flames, a National Transportation Safety Board investigative hearing was told Thursday. Flight 1354 was en route to Birmingham, Ala., from Louisville, Ky., a hub for the package delivery company. The pilots were completing their third flight since reporting to work the previous day in Illinois, according to information at the one-day hearing.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2012 | By Richard Verrier
In the latest effort combat production flight, the Los Angeles City Council is weighing a plan to waive fees producers pay to shoot television pilots in the city. The City Council's Jobs and Business Development Committee on Wednesday endorsed a proposal to waive the various fees pilot producers pay when they shoot substantially in the city. The motion comes in the wake of growing evidence that L.A. is losing its share of new television production, much as it did with feature film work.  In the most recent pilot year, 51% of all television pilots were filmed in the L.A. area, down from more than 80% in prior years.
NATIONAL
July 10, 2013 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON -- Under political pressure to act in the wake of the San Francisco jet crash, federal authorities announced Wednesday they will enact new aviation safety rules, including a requirement for increased training of U.S. pilots. While the new rules would apply only to pilots on U.S. passenger and cargo airlines, a group of lawmakers sought to use Saturday's crash-landing of a South Korean jetliner to call attention to aviation safety and put pressure on the FAA to complete work on rules that grew out of a 2009 plane crash near Buffalo, N.Y. "Flying in America has never been safer, but the tragic crash of Asiana Flight 214 is an urgent reminder that we must still constantly look for ways to make it even safer,” Rep. Rick Larsen of Washington state, top Democrat on the House aviation subcommittee, said in praising the FAA announcement.  The new rule, which becomes effective by early next week, would require first officers who fly U.S. passenger and cargo planes to have 1,500 hours of flight time - the same as captains - rather than 250 hours.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1997 | From Associated Press
American Airlines and its pilots passed up a chance Wednesday to have their contract dispute settled by an arbitrator, putting the nation's No. 2 carrier 30 days away from a possible strike. If no settlement is reached during the so-called cooling-off period, the pilots would be allowed to strike Feb. 15 and American would be free to impose the contract it wants. American's parent company, AMR Corp.
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