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ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2010 | By Liesl Bradner
Bay Area artist William T. Wiley's career could easily be viewed as a historical timeline of political and social issues of the last half century, touching on hot topics, including the Exxon Valdez oil spill of 1989, the 1986 Chernobyl meltdown, 9/11 and issues of government-supported torture. "What's It All Mean: William T. Wiley in Retrospect" at the Berkeley Art Museum offers a vibrant glimpse of the artist's California-centric work. The exhibition, which originated at the Smithsonian Art Museum last fall, includes 80 pieces that include watercolors, drawings, sculptures, books, film and even a pinball machine.
ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
February 27, 2013 | By Los Angeles Times staff
SFO Terminal 2. This bright space, formerly the airport's international terminal, was redone and reopened in 2011. Its 14 gates serve American and Virgin American flights, including many from LAX. Arriving, you find a yoga area, day spa, Peet's, Pinkberry, sushi, an organic café, a properly sized bookshop, a kids' playspace and even snazzy bathrooms (with those eco-chic Dyson air-blowers). Using an easy AirTrain and BART route, you can get from the terminal to Powell Street (near Union Square)
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NEWS
May 14, 1989 | Leonard Klady \f7
A young man springs his emotionally disturbed brother from an institution and heads out on the road. In the course of their travels, he discovers and exploits his brother's unique gift. Sound familiar? No, it's not "Rain Man II," but Universal's "The Wizard," starring Fred Savage of TV's "The Wonder Years." In David Chisholm's screenplay, Savage kidnaps his younger brother, who's traumatized while witnessing their sister's drowning. Though virtually speechless, kid brother turns out to be a video game wiz. They head for L.A., via Las Vegas, and an international tournament.
TRAVEL
March 4, 2012
If you go Pinball Hall of Fame, 1610 E. Tropicana Blvd., Las Vegas; http://www.pinballhall.org . Open 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Sundays-Thursdays, 11 a.m.-midnight Fridays and Saturdays. Closed major holidays. Free admission.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2000 | DARYL H. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A few years back, Pete Townshend revisited "Tommy," his double-album rock opera about a pinball-playing prodigy, and, with the assistance of theater director Des McAnuff, turned it into a buzzing, flashing pinball game of a musical. The show blunted some of the story's thornier issues and even seemed to embrace traditional values, which came as a shock to the generation that once rebelled by cranking up the volume on the Who's psychedelic 1969 recording.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1985 | PATT MORRISON
Well, Bruce, so it's come to this. While I was busy perfecting my three-cushion bank shot, while I was writing our initials in lipstick on the mirror down at the five-and-dime and wondering how I was going to gift-wrap a Hurst gearshift for your birthday, what were you doing? Getting married ! And not even giving me as much notice as I'd get for an overdue Texaco bill. That's gratitude for you. Ten years between us, Bruce. Think of that; I was loyal before you had muscles.
TRAVEL
February 27, 2013 | By Los Angeles Times staff
SFO Terminal 2. This bright space, formerly the airport's international terminal, was redone and reopened in 2011. Its 14 gates serve American and Virgin American flights, including many from LAX. Arriving, you find a yoga area, day spa, Peet's, Pinkberry, sushi, an organic café, a properly sized bookshop, a kids' playspace and even snazzy bathrooms (with those eco-chic Dyson air-blowers). Using an easy AirTrain and BART route, you can get from the terminal to Powell Street (near Union Square)
NEWS
December 1, 1985 | DAVID HALDANE, Times Staff Writer
They come to Long Beach from all around to play the game. From Los Angeles and the San Fernando Valley. From Riverside and San Bernardino. They are Asian refugees, bored housewives, business people out for a lark, would-be gamblers. They share a fascination for steel balls aimed at tiny holes and flashing yellow lights governed by skill and luck. Armed with spring-loaded pinball shooters and stacks of quarters, they stare intently forward as the fates tempt them on.
NEWS
February 7, 1995 | Associated Press
Paul Madison, a 25-year-old theater manager from Minneapolis, has won the title of "world's greatest pinball player." About 700 people--men, women and children ages 11 to 48--competed at the fifth annual world championships. Playing on a "Dirty Harry" pinball machine emblazoned with a menacing image of Clint Eastwood, Madison racked up a score of 3.2 billion. He won $2,000 in prize money and a new pinball machine.
BUSINESS
August 31, 1994 | AMY HARMON
Pinball, it seems, is still profitable. At a time when "Super Streetfighter 2" and sophisticated virtual reality games are all the rage at the video arcade, Sega Enterprises Ltd. plans to acquire Chicago-based Data East Pinball, the world's second-largest pinball maker.
TRAVEL
March 4, 2012 | By Christopher Smith, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Drop a quarter in a Las Vegas machine: lights blink, bells ring and odds are your money is headed to a casino bank account. But experiencing those same effects while your funds are funneled to charity? That's definitely outside the Sin City norm. This is what happens at a little known Vegas pleasure palace, the Pinball Hall of Fame, a five-minute drive east of the Strip. The 10,000-foot cinder-block building is thought to house the largest collection of historic pinball machines operating in America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2012 | By Joan Giangrasse Kates, Special to Tribune Newspapers
During the Depression, a Chicago man named Steve Kordek got a job as a solderer at Genco Pinball Co. and worked his way up from the production line to the engineering department. When the company's head designer fell ill, Kordek was told to fill in and design a new pinball game — one to beat all others. Then 26, he had never designed a game himself. So he borrowed a concept — the flipper — from a competitor. But instead of having six flippers in the upper playing field, he reduced it to two electrified flippers near the drain at the bottom, which resulted in more power to rocket the ball back to the top. At a 1948 pinball trade show, Kordek's groundbreaking "Triple Action" game stole the show and rendered every other arcade game obsolete.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2011 | By Sam Quinones, Los Angeles Times
The queen bed where pop star Michael Jackson took his last breath? It could be all yours. So too a chalkboard from the late singer's kitchen, on which, in children's scrawl, is written "I (heart) Daddy. SMILE, it's for free. " Then there's a bedroom armoire where Jackson, preparing for his comeback tour, wrote a message to himself: "TRAIN, perfection, March April. FULL OUT May," it reads. The entire contents from the 54,000-square foot Holmby Hills home where Jackson spent the last months of his life — from silverware and candles, desks and sofas, to a painting by French artist Maurice Utrillo — will be auctioned in December in Beverly Hills.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2011 | By Colin Stutz, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Tuesday night is league play night at Pins and Needles, a pinball club that Molly Atkinson runs out of her big costuming studio in Echo Park. A clamorous din of bells clanging, explosions booming, quarters dropping and hands slapping at buttons fills the room as rock music blares from speakers and about 30 people shout and talk over the machines. But this is no commercial arcade. "People come here expecting an arcade sometimes, and it's more like going to someone's aunt's house for their Scrabble club," said Atkinson, 32, with brown hair tied back, an L.A. Dodgers insignia tattooed behind her right ear and big eyes that pop with excitement.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2010 | By Liesl Bradner
Bay Area artist William T. Wiley's career could easily be viewed as a historical timeline of political and social issues of the last half century, touching on hot topics, including the Exxon Valdez oil spill of 1989, the 1986 Chernobyl meltdown, 9/11 and issues of government-supported torture. "What's It All Mean: William T. Wiley in Retrospect" at the Berkeley Art Museum offers a vibrant glimpse of the artist's California-centric work. The exhibition, which originated at the Smithsonian Art Museum last fall, includes 80 pieces that include watercolors, drawings, sculptures, books, film and even a pinball machine.
NATIONAL
July 1, 2008 | Ashley Powers, Times Staff Writer
Tim Quintana hunches over a pinball machine and stares down Spider-Man's archenemies: Kingpin, Lizard and Scorpion. He pulls the plunger and a silver ball shoots onto the playfield, a maze of brightly lit bumpers and targets. The ball darts over a comic-book-style drawing of Spider-Man reaching for his lady love, Mary Jane. The machine beeps: Blip-blip-blip-blip. The ball clangs off two mushroom-shaped bumpers. It plows into three square targets. Blip-blip-blip-blip.
NEWS
October 20, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
The Japanese government, trying to defuse opposition attempts to raise a new political scandal, admitted today that its ministers had received donations from the pinball industry but claimed that no wrong had been done. Chief Cabinet Secretary Mayumi Moriyama told reporters that pinball parlors made legal payments of nearly $35,000 to Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu and seven of his ministers over a four-year period. "There was nothing dubious," Kaifu told reporters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2008 | AL MARTINEZ
When you suggest to Keith Elwin that he might be a bit nerdish for having spent a good part of his 36 years playing pinball, he is quick to point out that he has interests other than flipping a little metal ball around. He mountain-bikes, swims, rock-climbs and takes photographs. It's just that, well, he's always liked playing pinball, and has become very good at it. In fact, Elwin, a graphic designer in his real life, is the No. 1 pinball professional in the world. And he's won just under $100,000 while achieving the title.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2007 | Darcy Cosper, Special to The Times
In a recent essay, Jonathan Selwood, author of "The Pinball Theory of Apocalypse," glibly asserts that "Los Angeles has long had the reputation of being the most superficial city on the planet, largely because. . . well, it is the most superficial city on the planet." If Los Angeles is the most anything, it's the city most likely to be depicted through the warped lens of idées reçues, as Selwood's debut aptly demonstrates.
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