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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 2004 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
A mysterious decline in the bark beetle population and the prospect of a wet winter have biologists cautiously predicting that the infestation that has felled tens of millions of pine trees from San Bernardino to Baja California may be nearing an end. "If we get a lot of rainfall this coming winter, odds are good the beetle population will stay down," said Tim Paine, an entomologist at UC Riverside.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2012 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
Two more golden eagles have been found dead at the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power wind farm in the Tehachapi Mountains, for a total of eight carcasses of the federally protected raptors found at the site. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is trying to determine the cause of death of the two golden eagles found Sunday at the Pine Tree wind farm, about 100 miles north of Los Angeles and 15 miles northeast of Mojave, said Lois Grunwald, a spokeswoman for the agency. The agency has determined that the six golden eagles found dead earlier at the 2-year-old wind farm in Kern County were struck by blades from some of the 90 turbines spread across 8,000 acres at the site.
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NEWS
August 22, 1987 | From Reuters
The island nation of Fiji has suffered its worst forest fire in 20 years, and politically motivated arsonists are suspected of starting it, forestry officials said Friday. The fire in the west of Fiji's main island, Viti Levu, was brought under control after burning 12,000 acres and destroying 5 million pine trees since it began Sunday night. Pine timber is one of Fiji's main industries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2011 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
Federal authorities are investigating the deaths of at least six golden eagles at the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power's Pine Tree Wind Project in the Tehachapi Mountains, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said Tuesday. So far, no wind-energy company has been prosecuted by federal wildlife authorities in connection with the death of birds protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act. A prosecution in the Pine Tree case could cause some rethinking and redesigning of this booming alternative energy source.
NATIONAL
May 27, 2002 | From Times wire reports
A bus returning to Dallas from a casino in Louisiana veered off the road and slammed into a grove of trees, killing one person and sending nearly 60 others to hospitals. Three or four people on the bus suffered life-threatening injuries, officials said. ''The bus just ran off the roadway, overcorrected, then came back into the median into a wooded area and struck several pine trees, but we don't know the cause,'' said Rosalie Turner, a Texas Department of Public Safety operator in Texarkana.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1995
Q: Why do some trees lose their leaves in winter, while pine trees do not? A: Trees that lose their leaves during the winter are called deciduous, from the Latin word meaning "to fall off," and the loss of leaves allows them to survive. Broad leaves, such as oak or elm, have a high surface area to capture sunlight for photosynthesis, but they also have many pores that allow water to escape into the air. When the ground is frozen, they would not be able to replace the water lost through leaves, and they would die, said biologist Eric Davies of the University of Nebraska.
NEWS
September 21, 1992 | TOM FURLONG
Can a tanker explosion have a greater purpose? Late one Saturday morning eight years ago, Dennis A. Haight, who had recently been laid off from his job as a steelworker and was several months behind on his home mortgage, was reading the paper when an Atlantic Richfield tanker crashed in flames near the front yard of his rural Pennsylvania home. Damage to his property proved to be minor--some scorched paint and torched pine trees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1999 | James Meier, (714) 966-5988
Illustrating the need to appease constituents as well as the business community, the City Council last week unanimously approved plans for a 24-hour Chevron service station with a 406-square-foot cashier building in Culver Plaza, at the corner of Culver and Irvine Center drives. Councilman Dave Christensen met with both sides to reach the compromise, which will require the installation of three layers of landscaping for a total of 44 trees.
WORLD
August 26, 2009 | Associated Press
With a wildfire contained after raging for days near Athens, opposition parties and media lambasted the government Tuesday over its response to the blaze. Firefighters patrolled smoldering areas north and east of the Greek capital, guarding against flare-ups while assessing the damage. At least 150 homes have been damaged, officials said, while thousands of acres of pine forest, olive grove, brush and farmland have been destroyed. Experts said it would take generations to replace the forests, and that many were burned beyond the hope of natural regrowth.
NEWS
March 18, 1985 | Associated Press
A tornado roared through a residential area in this community before dawn Sunday, killing at least two persons, injuring 41 others and destroying dozens of homes and businesses, authorities said. A second tornado touched down at Fort Ogden, 40 miles southeast of Venice, and a third skirted the northern edge of Lake Okeechobee, 100 miles east of Venice, causing only minor damage and no injuries. "We heard people screaming less than a block away. The devastation is about total.
WORLD
August 26, 2009 | Associated Press
With a wildfire contained after raging for days near Athens, opposition parties and media lambasted the government Tuesday over its response to the blaze. Firefighters patrolled smoldering areas north and east of the Greek capital, guarding against flare-ups while assessing the damage. At least 150 homes have been damaged, officials said, while thousands of acres of pine forest, olive grove, brush and farmland have been destroyed. Experts said it would take generations to replace the forests, and that many were burned beyond the hope of natural regrowth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2008 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
"Styx made sticks out of our pines!" was the cry that echoed beneath the Hollywood sign once the noisy chain saws and wood chippers were turned off. A row of stately Aleppo pines planted four decades ago in a historic Mulholland Highway center divider were missing their tops and most of their branches. Nearby residents quickly determined that the pruning had been ordered by Styx guitarist Tommy Shaw and his wife, Jeanne, to improve the view from their hillside home above the trees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2007 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
The Griffith Park ridge top looked a lot better Thursday than it did the first time John Loa was there. Happy schoolchildren were laughing this time in the cool morning air. A light breeze swept away the haze to make the view of Glendale's office buildings sparklingly clear. That's not the way it was Oct. 3, 1933, when Loa and 1,500 other Depression-era workers were marched to the ridge top so they could fight a small brush fire that was burning in the canyon beneath the hill.
NEWS
November 15, 2005 | Veronique de Turenne
AT first, no one knew what it was. A pine tree like no other growing deep in the Wollemi wilderness, a landscape of steep gorges and sheer sandstone cliffs in Australia's forbidding Blue Mountains. It had multiple trunks up to 130 feet tall, weird bubbly brown bark and fern-like fronds that grew in precise spirals.
OPINION
March 12, 2005
Re "Plan to Fell 17,000 Pines Decried," March 6: Monterey pine forests have been all but eliminated from our coast. These trees are so threatened that they have been listed as Endangered Species Habitat Area to protect them from the kind of plan put forward in Pebble Beach, where developers hope to cut down 17,000 trees to build a golf course. All you need to do is visit this area once to realize there is no shortage of opportunities to play golf. If the Pebble Beach Co. wants another golf course so badly, there are any number of courses that they could buy and save the trees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 2004 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
A mysterious decline in the bark beetle population and the prospect of a wet winter have biologists cautiously predicting that the infestation that has felled tens of millions of pine trees from San Bernardino to Baja California may be nearing an end. "If we get a lot of rainfall this coming winter, odds are good the beetle population will stay down," said Tim Paine, an entomologist at UC Riverside.
SPORTS
March 18, 1991 | MAL FLORENCE
Promoter Don King barely defended his long-held heavyweight championship for non sequiturs and convoluted rhetoric at a news conference preceding tonight's Mike Tyson-Razor Ruddock fight in Las Vegas. He had a worthy opponent in Ruddock's co-promoter, Murad Muhammad, who went for a quick knockout with a flurry of dazzling verbiage. Muhammad opened up by saying the fight was for the "International Continental National Championship" and introduced his fighter as "the next former heavyweight."
SPORTS
April 13, 1996 | THOMAS BONK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When is a good time to start getting nervous at the Masters? For some, it's just about the time you start driving up Magnolia Lane. But that's for rookies. There are plenty of opportunities for major nervous reactions out there on the course. How about when you are the U.S. Open champion and you are four over par after the first five holes on the first day? Obviously, this not a good place to be. Your drives are in the pine needles and your clubs ought to be in Rae's Creek.
SPORTS
March 18, 2004 | THOMAS BONK
You might not realize it, but you can almost see the azaleas from here, which means there's going to be an all-out sprint by a lot of players the next three weeks to get ready for the Masters. For many, this is the last chance to get their games in shape to stand up to the rigors of Augusta National, which again has been tweaked to make it even more difficult. This year's big change is at the 11th hole, where 36 trees have been planted on the right side of the fairway.
SPORTS
March 26, 2003 | BOB MIESZERSKI
Those who missed the Las Flores Handicap on Feb. 22 might see a rerun today. Well, almost. Spring Meadow, who won the Grade III by a neck, is missing, but four other participants are back for the $75,000 Pine Tree Lane at six furlongs. Brisquette, who was second in the Las Flores in her first main-track start of 2003, will probably be favored against Wild Tickle, who was in a dead heat for third last month; Secret Liaison, who was sixth in the Las Flores, and last-place finisher Shameful.
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