Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsPink Panther
IN THE NEWS

Pink Panther

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 7, 1991 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Iraqi captors forced him to denounce the Gulf War in front of a television camera, Chief Warrant Officer Guy L. Hunter Jr. for the briefest instant imitated his favorite character, the bumbling Inspector Clouseau of "The Pink Panther." It was Hunter's subtle signal to his wife, Mary, that he was fine and that he was following orders when he assumed his stilted Peter Sellers voice to call the war "crazy."
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
The world's most successful ring of diamond thieves is inventively and insightfully explored in the documentary "Smash and Grab: The Story of the Pink Panthers. " Director Havana Marking eschews "Ocean's Eleven"-style tension for a more personal, contextual approach to how this international robbery network, named after the pricey pink diamond from the Inspector Clouseau comedies, arose in the wake of the chaotic, early-1990s dismantling of its founders' homeland, the former Yugoslavia.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 29, 1993 | N.F. MENDOZA N.F. MENDOZA..BD: TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 30, he's still pink and cool as ever. The Pink Panther is getting ready for bed and brushing his teeth in typically sly fashion. As he climbs into bed, he yawns and says, "Good night, Goldie." "Good night , Goldie" ???? Hey, wait a minute! The Pink Panther doesn't talk. Isn't Henry Mancini's music all we've ever heard as the Panther sound? Well, at least till now. The crafty cat has finally found his voice. And it sounds suspiciously like Max Headroom's.
WORLD
July 29, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
A lone jewel thief who struck the lavish Carlton InterContinental hotel in the French Riviera resort of Cannes made off with $136 million in diamond-encrusted watches and gems, in one of the biggest jewel heists in history, French authorities said Monday. Initially, the jewels stolen midday Sunday were valued at $53 million. A subsequent inventory disclosed that more had been taken from a poorly guarded hotel room, where items were being stored for a diamond exhibit by the Dubai-based Leviev diamond house, Philippe Vique of the regional prosecutor's office told local media.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 1993 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Pink Panther series, particularly in its early years, gave us all some classic comic set-pieces, and a great world-class bumbler in Peter Sellers' Inspector Clouseau, so perhaps the errant ineptitude of "Son of the Pink Panther" (countywide) can be forgiven--and quickly forgotten. Actually, this series ran out of steam long ago, and director Blake Edwards hasn't exactly rung in a new era by casting Italian superstar comic Roberto Benigni in the title role.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1993 | CHARLES SOLOMON
Both of the new animated children's shows that premiere today play off earlier cartoons. The suave, rose-colored feline who made his debut in 1964 in the titles for Blake Edwards' live-action comedy, "The Pink Panther," and later starred in 140 theatrical shorts and a television series, returns in new adventures at 8:30 a.m. (KCOP, Channel 13). For the first time in his 29-year career, the Panther talks: Matt Frewer (Max Headroom) provides a voice that suggests Dudley Do-Right turned yuppie.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1990 | THOMAS K. ARNOLD
For the last four years, the Pink Panther has been the hangout for hip local rock 'n' roll types, but management will be shutting it down for good at the end of this month because of dwindling attendance and problems with the lease. Since 1986, the seedy little bar on Morena Boulevard in Bay Park has been a direct link to the oh-so-trendy post-punk underground. The informal dress code called for lots of black and lots of leather.
BUSINESS
August 8, 1986 | MARTHA GROVES, Times Staff Writer
Wickes Chairman Sanford C. Sigoloff became a household face in Southern California by appearing as the awe-inspiring boss in TV commercials for the company's Builders Emporium stores, in which a chorus of employees shouted: "We got the message, Mr. Sigoloff!" His spotlight-capturing style is in stark contrast to that of William W. Boeschenstein, chairman of Owens-Corning Fiberglas, the building products manufacturer for which Wickes made an unsolicited $2-billion bid two days ago.
NEWS
November 9, 1989 | BARBARA KOH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He sells fiberglass and Brazilian yogurt, eats lunch with Japanese office ladies, brings silent cheer to sick children and hovers above Macy's Thanksgiving parade. One look at him, and you start mouthing his song. He's hot--hot pink--and today the Pink Panther turns 25. This week, which his creators have dubbed "Paint the Town Pink" week, he is celebrating with a slew of visits to hospitals, cheerleading contests at malls and a celebrity-studded charity fund-raiser.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2009 | Noel Murray
Confessions of a Shopaholic Touchstone, $29.99/$32.99; Blu-ray, $39.99 The first novel in Sophie Kinsella's "Shopaholic" series was published in 2001, when the economy was booming and consumption was more happily conspicuous. The movie adaptation "Confessions of a Shopaholic," starring Isla Fisher as a free-spender who becomes involved with a frugal magazine editor, was released in early 2009, as a global recession neared its trough.
WORLD
July 29, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
A lone jewel thief who struck the lavish Carlton International Hotel in the French Riviera resort of Cannes made off with $136 million in diamond-encrusted watches and gems, making it one of the biggest jewel heists in history, French authorities reported Monday. Initial estimates of the stolen jewels after the brazen midday theft on Sunday put their value at $53 million. A subsequent inventory disclosed that more had been taken from a poorly guarded hotel room, where other items were being stored for a diamond exhibit by Dubai-based Leviev diamond house, Philippe Vique of the regional prosecutor's office told local media.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Blake Edwards, a writer-director who battled depression in his personal life yet was known as a modern master of slapstick and sophisticated wit with hit films such as the "Pink Panther" comedies, "10" and "Breakfast at Tiffany's," has died. He was 88. Edwards died of complications of pneumonia Wednesday evening at St. John's Health Center in Santa Monica, said Gene Schwam, Edwards' longtime publicist. His wife, Julie Andrews, and members of the immediate family were at his bedside.
WORLD
July 29, 2009 | Jeffrey Fleishman
So let's get this straight. A guy in the raspberry business from western Serbia smashes and grabs his way through a heist eight time zones away in Tokyo and scoots off past shopping centers and sushi bars with a $31-million necklace known as the Countess of Vendome. It happens. Djordjije Rasovic graced arrest warrants, a thief with brazen nerves, part of an international Balkan crime gang known as the Pink Panthers.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2009 | Noel Murray
Confessions of a Shopaholic Touchstone, $29.99/$32.99; Blu-ray, $39.99 The first novel in Sophie Kinsella's "Shopaholic" series was published in 2001, when the economy was booming and consumption was more happily conspicuous. The movie adaptation "Confessions of a Shopaholic," starring Isla Fisher as a free-spender who becomes involved with a frugal magazine editor, was released in early 2009, as a global recession neared its trough.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2009 | BETSY SHARKEY, FILM CRITIC
"The Pink Panther 2" slinks into theaters this week with all the stealth of a monster truck with a bad muffler, or a Howie Mandel game show (or use your own favorite over-the-top analogy here). It is all about excess and extremes with any shred, sliver or speck of nuance as elusive as the Pink Panther diamond and apparently Jeremy Irons' self-esteem, but more on that later.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2008 | Bloomberg News
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Inc. doesn't owe any profits from the "Pink Panther" films to the heirs of a man who co-wrote the first movie treatment about the bumbling Inspector Jacques Clouseau, a federal appeals court ruled Thursday. Heirs of Maurice Richlin claimed in a lawsuit against MGM that Richlin's role in writing the initial plot outline in 1962 made him a co-author of the 1963 film "The Pink Panther" and its nine sequels, giving them rights to the movie's copyright. An appeals court in San Francisco disagreed, saying Richlin assigned all rights to the treatment to a production company that made and copyrighted the film.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1995 | JAMES P. PINKERTON, James P. Pinkerton is a lecturer at the Graduate School of Political Management at George Washington University.
You may think that Bill Clinton is the most dithering, irrelevant President since Chester Alan Arthur, but maybe that's just what he wants you to think. Perhaps the Administration's bumbling, Inspector Clouseau-like ways are just a disguise to conceal Clinton's truly Machiavellian guile. Whoa, you say.
NEWS
January 17, 1991 | TODD EVERETT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Even by their own standards, members of the Magnificent Moorpark Melodrama reach a new height in silliness in their production of "The Pink Panther Strikes Again." Following that production, the company turns in a half-hour abridgement of the recent Broadway (and current Los Angeles) hit, "Jerome Robbins' Broadway." All in all, it's quite a rewarding--and a little exhausting--three or so hours.
NEWS
December 14, 2006 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
PETER SELLERS was one of the clown princes of cinematic comedy. A true chameleon, he was a deft master of accents and pratfalls. Movie magic was created when the British actor teamed with director Blake Edwards for "The Pink Panther" comedy series, in which Sellers played the inept Inspector Clouseau. (Interestingly, Peter Ustinov was slated to play Clouseau, but when he pulled out of the film shortly before production began, Edwards hired Sellers to play the clueless lawman.
BUSINESS
February 13, 2006 | Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writer
When Sony Pictures bought Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer last year, one of the films it inherited was a remake of "The Pink Panther," the classic Peter Sellers comedy. The $80-million movie, starring Steve Martin as the famous French detective Jacques Clouseau, was already shot, edited and in the can. But everyone who saw it agreed it had a fatal flaw: Martin's character, who was a bumbling innocent in the 1964 film and its four sequels, came off more like a dirty old man.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|