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Pinseeker Golf Corp

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BUSINESS
May 24, 1991 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A company that helped pioneer an innovative type of golf club plans to go public with an initial offering of 1.2 million common shares that could raise up to $3.5 million in capital, according to a Securities and Exchange Commission filing disclosed Thursday. Pinseeker Golf Corp.
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BUSINESS
May 24, 1991 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A company that helped pioneer an innovative type of golf club plans to go public with an initial offering of 1.2 million common shares that could raise up to $3.5 million in capital, according to a Securities and Exchange Commission filing disclosed Thursday. Pinseeker Golf Corp.
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BUSINESS
October 26, 1990 | CRISTINA LEE, TIME STAFF WRITER
A Denver investment group said Thursday that it has hooked two small Santa Ana golf-products companies--Pinseeker Golf Corp. and Larlen Inc.--to get a slice of the action on the increasingly popular sport. The Exeter Group said it paid more than $4 million to acquire Pinseeker, a manufacturer of golf clubs and related equipment sold nationally through golf specialty shops. The Santa Ana firm has annual sales of about $7 million. Pinseeker has been solely owned since 1976 by Michael Metzgar Sr.
BUSINESS
October 26, 1990 | CRISTINA LEE, TIME STAFF WRITER
A Denver investment group said Thursday that it has hooked two small Santa Ana golf-products companies--Pinseeker Golf Corp. and Larlen Inc.--to get a slice of the action on the increasingly popular sport. The Exeter Group said it paid more than $4 million to acquire Pinseeker, a manufacturer of golf clubs and related equipment sold nationally through golf specialty shops. The Santa Ana firm has annual sales of about $7 million. Pinseeker has been solely owned since 1976 by Michael Metzgar Sr.
BUSINESS
July 28, 1985
Unlike the pros, whose livelihood demands an intimate knowledge of the tools of their trade, amateur golfers--from duffers to scratch players--probably don't realize that their top-of-the-line irons, like pieces of fine jewelry, are cast through the "lost-wax" method and finished by hand. First, molten wax is injected into a metal mold of the club's head. The finished wax molds are dipped in layers of silica sand and crushed rock over several days to form a ceramic shell.
BUSINESS
November 26, 1987 | DAVID OLMOS, Times Staff Writer
It's a company where employees call the owner "the colonel," its products have names like Bullet, Bombshell and Fireball, and there's a vice president of logistics. One of Orange County's many defense contractors, perhaps? No, this Santa Ana company's products won't be found on the battlefield. But you may see them blasting out of a bunker in a war zone of a different type: the local golf course. The company, Pinseeker Golf Corp.
NEWS
June 27, 1991 | BEA MAXWELL
SPRINT(Special Preventive Research, Intervention and New Technology for Children at UCLA) netted more than $150,000 at the benefit opening night of "The Music of Andrew Lloyd Webber" at Universal Amphitheatre on June 20. An English supper party followed. Funds will go to research programs to prevent disabling birth conditions and development of new treatments for children before birth and in the early years of life.
NEWS
June 15, 1989 | PATRICK MOTT, Patrick Mott is a regular contributor to Orange County Life
When she first strode into the unforgiving field of the Ladies Professional Golf Assn. tour 18 years ago, Sally Little looked like Princess Diana and played like Wyatt Earp. Fourteen years later, she had picked her rivals' collective pockets on the golf course to the tune of $1.2 million to become the LPGA tour's 12th millionaire. But on the road from rookie to riches, Sally Little became so desperately ill that she could barely hold a club, much less control it. She suffered bouts of depression and near-constant pain.
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