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NATIONAL
December 17, 2013 | By Ralph Vartabedian
About 3 million barrels of crude are being loaded into the southern section of the Keystone XL pipeline as operators prepare to start operations next month, even as environmental critics continue to assail the safety of the project and lament legal setbacks that allowed the project to move forward. TransCanada, the Alberta-based pipeline company, announced Tuesday that it would begin shipping oil on Jan. 22 on its Gulf Coast project, a 485-mile pipeline that forms the southern section of the XL from Cushing, Okla., to Texas.
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WORLD
December 13, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee
CONKLIN, Canada - Can the Keystone XL pipeline be built without significantly worsening greenhouse gas emissions and climate change? For President Obama, that is the main criterion for granting a federal permit to allow the pipeline to cross from southern Alberta into the United States. Canadian authorities and the oil industry say measures already in place or under consideration to cut greenhouse gases ensure that Keystone XL can pass that test. "We absolutely think we can maintain growth in oil and gas, and achieve greenhouse gas reductions," said Nicole Spears, a climate policy expert with Alberta's Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Resource Development.
NEWS
December 2, 2013 | By Evan Halper
WASHINGTON -- Tom Steyer, the billionaire hedge fund executive and environmental activist from San Francisco, chose his venue carefully. “It is here President Obama drew his own personal line in the sand,” Steyer said as he convened a conference on the Keystone XL pipeline Monday at Georgetown University. The reference was to a speech by Obama in June in which the president declared he would approve Keystone only if backers of the pipeline could prove that the project would not accelerate climate change.
NATIONAL
November 14, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
A small town about 50 miles south of Dallas was evacuated out of caution Thursday after officials said a 10-inch pipeline exploded and sent flames and a plume of smoke into the air visible for miles around. No injuries have been reported, Milford Fire Department Chief Mark Jackson told the Los Angeles Times in a  phone interview. Jackson said officials were waiting for the fire to burn out instead of actively fighting it. A lieutenant with the Ellis County Sheriff's Office told the Dallas CBS affiliate they expected it would take 24 hours for the fire to burn out. Milford has a population of 728 people.
NATIONAL
November 14, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON - Officials are letting a fire burn out at a Chevron liquefied gas pipeline that exploded in a rural north Texas town Thursday when a construction crew accidentally drilled into the conduit. The town of Milford, about 50 miles south of Dallas, was evacuated, with many of its 700 residents going to a gym in the nearby town of Italy. They are not expected to be allowed back until Friday morning at the earliest, Milford Fire Chief Mark Jackson said. He said no injuries were reported after the 9:40 a.m. blast.
NATIONAL
November 14, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON - Officials are letting a fire burn out at a  Chevron gas pipeline line that exploded  in the rural north Texas town of Milford on Thursday and prompted evacuations. No injuries have been reported after the 9:40 a.m. CST explosion in Milford, home to about 700 residents 50 miles south of Dallas, officials said. Sara Garcia, special projects director for the county judge who has been receiving updates on the fire, told the Los Angeles Times that Chevron representatives were on site.
NATIONAL
October 23, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON - About sundown one Sunday in September, North Dakota farmer Steven Jensen noticed that his combine was running over wet, squishy earth in a wheat field he was harvesting. When he took a closer look, he saw that oil had coated the wheels and that it was bubbling up about 6 inches high in spots. That was Sept. 29; Jensen contacted authorities immediately. At least 20,600 barrels of oil leaked onto the Jensens' land from a pipeline owned by Tesoro Logistics, one of the largest land-based spills in recent history.
NEWS
September 26, 2013 | By David Lauter
WASHINGTON -- In the debate over energy and climate change, the public continues to give support to both sides, according to a a new poll. By more than a 2-1 margin, respondents in a new Pew Research Center poll said they favor building the Keystone XL pipeline, which would carry oil from tar sands deposits under Canada's western prairies through the Midwest to refineries in Texas. Republicans in Congress have strongly advocated building the pipeline, while President Obama has given mixed signals on the project, saying he would approve it only if doing so would not contribute to global warming.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz
Utility giant Pacific Gas & Electric Co. will pay out $565 million in legal settlements and other claims stemming from the 2010 natural gas explosion in San Bruno, Calif., that killed eight people and devastated a neighborhood, company officials said this week. The blast in September 2010 also injured dozens and destroyed 38 homes when a 54-year-old pipeline exploded underneath the San Francisco suburb. Brittany Chord, a spokesperson for the utility, said settlements were reached with 347 victims of the incident on Friday and Monday and had previously reached settlements with 152 others.
NATIONAL
August 19, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON - The Interior Department has warned that the proposed Keystone XL pipeline could have long-term, damaging effects on wildlife near its route, contradicting the State Department's March draft environmental assessment, which concluded the project would have only a temporary, indirect impact. In a 12-page letter sent as part of the public comment on the draft assessment, the Interior Department repeatedly labels as inaccurate its sister agency's conclusions that Keystone XL would have short-lived effects on wildlife and only during the project's construction.
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