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Piper Kerman

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July 11, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
Piper Kerman was a comfortably settled member of the Manhattan creative class on the day in 1998 when two police officers knocked on her door, telling her she'd been indicted for her brief but fateful involvement in a drug-trafficking operation years earlier. By the time she finally went to prison six years later, she was engaged, in her 30s and desperate to get her 15-month sentence over with. “The beginning of the sentence was the beginning of seeing the light at the end of the tunnel,” Kerman said this week, over a late lunch of heirloom tomatoes at the trendy New York City gastropub the Breslin -- a far cry from the iceberg lettuce and mystery meat she subsisted on while locked up at a federal prison in Danbury, Conn.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2014 | By Todd Martens
"Orange Is the new Black" will be returning for a second season on June 6, Netflix confirmed on Saturday. The announcement was tucked onto the end of the second-season finale of "House of Cards," the full 13 episodes of which went live on Netflix at midnight PST. A brief teaser trailer, embedded above, was released, but few details or hints as to what viewers may expect in the second season were revealed. Also unknown at press time is how the president feels about the series. Barack Obama's TV tastes became national news when he asked via Twitter that no one spoil "House of Cards" for the Oval Office viewing audience . Jenji Kohan's women-in-prison comedy-drama, an adaptation of  Piper Kerman's memoir, which chronicled her yearlong stint in federal prison, earned its lead, Taylor Schilling, a Golden Globe nomination in its first season.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2013 | By Celine Wright
The women in this summer's lauded Netflix series "Orange Is the New Black" are as colorful as the orange jumpsuits worn by the inmates of Litchfield Prison where the show is set. Though they live within the confines of the same barbed wire fence, the prisoners' backgrounds are radically different, forming a mosaic of backgrounds and personalities. "As the show goes on, they peel back the layers, and you get deeper in knowing who these people are," says Uzo Aduba, who plays Suzanne "Crazy Eyes" Warren, one of the series' breakout characters.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2013 | By Yvonne Villarreal
This old dog is still open to new tricks, witness this year's Golden Globes nominations. Fresh blood was the theme of this year's TV portion when nods for the 71st annual Golden Globe Awards were announced Thursday. The Hollywood Foreign Press Assn. has long been open to embracing new TV shows, and that's no different this year. After getting passed over when SAG nominations were announced Wednesday, "Orange is the New Black" finally seems to be somewhat in season. The Netflix prison dramedy, based on the Piper Kerman memoir of the same name, scored nominations for its star Taylor Schilling, who plays Piper, a WASP-y artisan soap maker who is busted for smuggling drug money years after the fact.
OPINION
September 13, 2013 | By Rayya Elias
"What do you think of 'Orange Is the New Black?'" Since Netflix's series about life in a women's prison premiered this summer, I've fielded the same question from almost everyone I know. I guess it's because I have some experience on the subject. Before I got clean, I spent many years in and out of jails and correctional institutions. I did a short stint at New York City's Rikers Island in 1995, and participated in a six-month alternative-to-incarceration program administered by the Women's Prison Assn.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2013 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
By cultural indications, the Netflix original series 'Orange Is the New Black' appears to be a hit. The prison comedy, based on Piper Kerman's autobiography about her 15-month incarceration in a federal correctional facility on a decade-old drug offense, has garnered extensive media coverage -- and a parody photo featuring the puppets from the Broadway musical "Avenue Q. " But the precise size of its audience remains cloaked in mystery --...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2014 | By Todd Martens
"Orange Is the new Black" will be returning for a second season on June 6, Netflix confirmed on Saturday. The announcement was tucked onto the end of the second-season finale of "House of Cards," the full 13 episodes of which went live on Netflix at midnight PST. A brief teaser trailer, embedded above, was released, but few details or hints as to what viewers may expect in the second season were revealed. Also unknown at press time is how the president feels about the series. Barack Obama's TV tastes became national news when he asked via Twitter that no one spoil "House of Cards" for the Oval Office viewing audience . Jenji Kohan's women-in-prison comedy-drama, an adaptation of  Piper Kerman's memoir, which chronicled her yearlong stint in federal prison, earned its lead, Taylor Schilling, a Golden Globe nomination in its first season.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2013 | By Mary McNamara
An hourlong comedy about women in prison. Released in summer. Without the requisite big-name lead. On Netflix. Television just does not get any more experimental than that. And, as Mary McNamara and Yvonne Villarreal discuss in this week's Talking TV video, "Orange Is the New Black" proves precisely why experiments are so important. Lacking the A-list hype (Kevin Spacey! Robin Wright!) surrounding "House of Cards" and the anticipatory lovefest that led up to the resurrection of "Arrested Development," Jenji Kohan's adaptation of Piper Kerman's memoir, also called "Orange Is the New Black," not only seems buzzier than both those shows combined, it's way more important.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2013 | By Mary McNamara
"Orange is the New Black. " Jenji Kohan's serialized adaptation of Piper Kerman's memoir about doing time in a women's prison, proves that Netflix isn't just delivering original content in a unique way (i.e. a season at a time). It's also delivering unique content. Smart, funny and surprisingly moving, "Orange is the New Black" dares to suggest that the pretty, white, middle-class gal that television so loves to position as an Everywoman is nothing of the kind. As Piper Chapman, Taylor Shilling has all the high-maintenance, obliviously entitled tics down pat. Having finally gotten her life together -- the nice apartment, the devoted boyfriend, the artisanal soap business -- Piper is more than a little outraged that she is going to be punished for the youthful "indiscretion" of carrying drug money for an former drug-dealing girlfriend.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2013 | By Yvonne Villarreal
There's something to be said about being a walking billboard. Jenji Kohan, best known for being the creator of Showtime's "Weeds," fully embraces the task. Her nails - hands and toes - are coated in an orange hue. Her short hair is dizzied up with orange streaks. "I don't know how this Netflix promotion works," Kohan joked. "I'm just trying to spread the word anyway I can. " PHOTOS: Hollywood Backlot moments The 43-year-old writer-producer is at the helm of Netflix's latest commission to roll out this year: "Orange Is the New Black.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
Taylor Schilling earned her first Golden Globe nomination Thursday morning for portraying Piper Chapman, a New York yuppie sent to prison in the dramedy “Orange Is the New Black.” Based on Piper Kerman's memoir of the same name, the series quietly debuted this past summer on Netflix.   Bolstered by strong word of mouth and critical praise, it went on to become the service's most-watched original, besting the more heavily promoted "Arrested Development" and "House of Cards.
OPINION
September 13, 2013 | By Rayya Elias
"What do you think of 'Orange Is the New Black?'" Since Netflix's series about life in a women's prison premiered this summer, I've fielded the same question from almost everyone I know. I guess it's because I have some experience on the subject. Before I got clean, I spent many years in and out of jails and correctional institutions. I did a short stint at New York City's Rikers Island in 1995, and participated in a six-month alternative-to-incarceration program administered by the Women's Prison Assn.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2013 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
By cultural indications, the Netflix original series 'Orange Is the New Black' appears to be a hit. The prison comedy, based on Piper Kerman's autobiography about her 15-month incarceration in a federal correctional facility on a decade-old drug offense, has garnered extensive media coverage -- and a parody photo featuring the puppets from the Broadway musical "Avenue Q. " But the precise size of its audience remains cloaked in mystery --...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2013 | By Mary McNamara
An hourlong comedy about women in prison. Released in summer. Without the requisite big-name lead. On Netflix. Television just does not get any more experimental than that. And, as Mary McNamara and Yvonne Villarreal discuss in this week's Talking TV video, "Orange Is the New Black" proves precisely why experiments are so important. Lacking the A-list hype (Kevin Spacey! Robin Wright!) surrounding "House of Cards" and the anticipatory lovefest that led up to the resurrection of "Arrested Development," Jenji Kohan's adaptation of Piper Kerman's memoir, also called "Orange Is the New Black," not only seems buzzier than both those shows combined, it's way more important.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2013 | By Celine Wright
The women in this summer's lauded Netflix series "Orange Is the New Black" are as colorful as the orange jumpsuits worn by the inmates of Litchfield Prison where the show is set. Though they live within the confines of the same barbed wire fence, the prisoners' backgrounds are radically different, forming a mosaic of backgrounds and personalities. "As the show goes on, they peel back the layers, and you get deeper in knowing who these people are," says Uzo Aduba, who plays Suzanne "Crazy Eyes" Warren, one of the series' breakout characters.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2013 | By Mary McNamara
"Orange is the New Black. " Jenji Kohan's serialized adaptation of Piper Kerman's memoir about doing time in a women's prison, proves that Netflix isn't just delivering original content in a unique way (i.e. a season at a time). It's also delivering unique content. Smart, funny and surprisingly moving, "Orange is the New Black" dares to suggest that the pretty, white, middle-class gal that television so loves to position as an Everywoman is nothing of the kind. As Piper Chapman, Taylor Shilling has all the high-maintenance, obliviously entitled tics down pat. Having finally gotten her life together -- the nice apartment, the devoted boyfriend, the artisanal soap business -- Piper is more than a little outraged that she is going to be punished for the youthful "indiscretion" of carrying drug money for an former drug-dealing girlfriend.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
Piper Kerman was a comfortably settled member of the Manhattan creative class on the day in 1998 when two police officers knocked on her door, telling her she'd been indicted for her brief but fateful involvement in a drug-trafficking operation years earlier. By the time she finally went to prison six years later, she was engaged, in her 30s and desperate to get her 15-month sentence over with. “The beginning of the sentence was the beginning of seeing the light at the end of the tunnel,” Kerman said this week, over a late lunch of heirloom tomatoes at the trendy New York City gastropub the Breslin -- a far cry from the iceberg lettuce and mystery meat she subsisted on while locked up at a federal prison in Danbury, Conn.
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