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NEWS
January 29, 2004
Casting: Racing aficionado Paul Newman will provide the voice of one of the characters in "Cars," a new film from Pixar Animation Studios, the company that made "Toy Story" and "A Bug's Life."
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2013 | By Meg James
Walt Disney Co. Chief Executive Bob Iger was honored with the UCLA Anderson School of Management John Wooden Global Leadership Award during an evening that celebrated impressive records. At the UCLA gala Thursday night at the Beverly Hilton, Iger's won-loss record was compared to that of the legendary UCLA basketball coach, who posted a 620-147 record in his 27 years at the helm. Since Iger took the reins of the Burbank entertainment giant in 2005, the value of Disney's stock has tripled.
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BUSINESS
September 11, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Walt Disney Co. has given broader responsibilities to two key animation executives by naming them each to newly created general manager positions at the company's two major animation divisions. Andrew Millstein will continue to oversee the daily operations of Walt Disney Animation Studios in addition to now running DisneyToon Studios, which produces direct-to-DVD animated movies. Jim Morris, who has been managing the production of features and shorts at Pixar Animation Studios, will also assume responsibility for overall operations.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2013 | By Daniel Miller
Pixar Animation Studios has laid off an undisclosed number of people at its Emeryville, Calif., headquarters due to the delay of its forthcoming film "The Good Dinosaur. " The layoffs affect less than 5% of the company's 1,200-person workforce, according to a source close to the studio. In September, "The Good Dinosaur" was pushed back from its original release date of May 30, 2014, to Nov. 25, 2015. About a month before the project was delayed, the studio, a unit of Walt Disney Studios, removed  director Bob Peterson from the project.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2012 | By Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
When his movie "John Carter" thudded into theaters in March, director Andrew Stanton escaped to New York and spent the next three weeks riding the subway, noodling on scripts and visiting with his daughter and some friends. For the first time since he started at Pixar Animation Studios in 1990 at age 24, Stanton was facing an unfamiliar sensation - the gut punch of a public failure in an industry that hardly shelters it. The film had forced Walt Disney Studios to take a $200-million write-down and helped lead to the departure of two top executives.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2006
Regarding "Pixar's Creative Chief to Have Special Power at Disney: Greenlighting Movies," Jan. 27: Why didn't Walt Disney Co. Chief Executive Bob Iger just steal John Lasseter away from Pixar Animation Studios and set him up in his own shop? I guarantee it would have cost the shareholders far less than $7 billion. Jon Crowley Sherman Oaks
BUSINESS
June 3, 2004 | From Reuters
Walt Disney Co. Chief Executive Michael Eisner said there was still a chance for a new film distribution deal with "Finding Nemo" creator Pixar Animation Studios Inc. but noted that the companies were not in talks. "I will not believe it is over until it is over," he said at an investor conference. He said that discussions, broken off in January by computer-animation king Pixar, had not reopened. "We can only make half the deal. I am just an eternal optimist," Eisner said.
BUSINESS
April 5, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Pixar Animation Studios President Ed Catmull will get 400,000 Pixar shares in connection with the Emeryville, Calif.-based company's $7.4-billion sale to Walt Disney Co. The Pixar shares would be worth $25.6 million at Tuesday's closing price of $64.10. Catmull's pay was approved by the compensation committee of Pixar's board, Burbank-based Disney said in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission.
BUSINESS
October 25, 2005 | From Reuters
Shareholders have sued Pixar Animation Studios Inc. in two proposed class actions that claim the company misled investors with inflated projections for DVD sales of its hit title "The Incredibles." A Pixar spokesman described the lawsuits as "completely baseless." Both lawsuits were filed in U.S. District Court in Northern California and purport to represent those who held Pixar shares between Jan.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
If the Walt Disney Studios logo were the only one on "Brave," this film's impeccable visuals and valiant heroine would be enough to call it a success. But "Brave" is also a Pixar Animation Studios film, and that means it has to answer to a higher standard. Pixar's dozen previous features, including classics like"Toy Story,""Up,""Wall-E, ""Ratatouille"and"The Incredibles,"have used subversive wit and singular characters to set a standard for computer-animated features that is the envy of the civilized world.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2013 | By John Horn
The animation exodus from 2014 is continuing as Universal Pictures announced that it will move its “Minions in 3D,” a spinoff from the blockbuster “Despicable Me” franchise, from December 2014 to July 10, 2015. The move comes the same week that Disney said it was moving its troubled Pixar Animation Studios title “The Good Dinosaur” from May 2014 to November 25, 2015. Pixar is replacing the film's director, Bob Peterson, and the resulting production delays will mean that Pixar will have no theatrical release next year, the first time since 2005 that the studio will go a calendar year without a new movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2012 | By Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
When his movie "John Carter" thudded into theaters in March, director Andrew Stanton escaped to New York and spent the next three weeks riding the subway, noodling on scripts and visiting with his daughter and some friends. For the first time since he started at Pixar Animation Studios in 1990 at age 24, Stanton was facing an unfamiliar sensation - the gut punch of a public failure in an industry that hardly shelters it. The film had forced Walt Disney Studios to take a $200-million write-down and helped lead to the departure of two top executives.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
If the Walt Disney Studios logo were the only one on "Brave," this film's impeccable visuals and valiant heroine would be enough to call it a success. But "Brave" is also a Pixar Animation Studios film, and that means it has to answer to a higher standard. Pixar's dozen previous features, including classics like"Toy Story,""Up,""Wall-E, ""Ratatouille"and"The Incredibles,"have used subversive wit and singular characters to set a standard for computer-animated features that is the envy of the civilized world.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2012 | By Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
EMERYVILLE, Calif. - It takes a fearless sort of man to wear a skirt to the office - even when the office is a den of art school grads, the boss is an avuncular guy with a Hawaiian shirt fetish and the skirt is a stylish plaid number designed for charging through the Scottish Highlands. Mark Andrews, originator of "kilt Fridays" at Pixar Animation Studios here in Northern California, has the requisite nerve. So when Pixar Chief Creative Officer John Lasseter announced in late 2010 that "creative differences" had arisen on the studio's movie"Brave" - which centers on a rebellious teenage princess in ancient Scotland - and that director Brenda Chapman was being replaced, he looked to Andrews.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2012 | By Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
"Brave," its filmmakers at Pixar Animation Studios would like you to know, is not your mother's fairy tale, beginning with its unruly heroine, Merida. Deft with a bow and arrow and crowned with a massive mane of curly red hair, Merida (voiced by Scottish actress Kelly Macdonald), defies her parents King Fergus (Billy Connolly) and Queen Elinor (Emma Thompson) and disregards an ancient custom, inadvertently setting off calamity in the lush, fog-shrouded Scottish highlands where she lives.
BUSINESS
June 24, 2011 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
"Cars 2" will get a checkered flag by the end of this box-office weekend, but it won't be traveling in the fast lane. The latest release from Walt Disney Co.-owned Pixar Animation Studios will continue the studio's unblemished record of No. 1 openings, but it is expected to debut with only $50 million to $55 million worth of tickets, according to people who have seen pre-release surveys. That would be the second-lowest opening in the last decade for a Pixar movie, ahead of only "Ratatouille's" $47 million in 2007.
NEWS
April 27, 2007
Pixar stock options: An article in Business on April 10 about an exchange offer made to employees of Pixar Animation Studios by the company's new owner, Walt Disney Co., mischaracterized the backdating of stock options at Pixar. The article suggested that a fraud had been committed when Pixar backdated options by choosing dates for grants when the company's stock price was low to make them more valuable later. Disney disclosed shortly after buying Pixar last year that the company was under investigation by federal regulators for backdating.
BUSINESS
January 3, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
'Toy Story' Video Sequel Being Considered: In a press release, Richmond, Calif.-based Pixar Animation Studios, which produced the hit Walt Disney film using innovative computer technology, said it is discussing a direct-to-video sequel with Disney. "Toy Story," which has grossed more than $150 million to date domestically at the box office, has been Hollywood's biggest hit over the holiday season. No details of the prospective project were announced.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2011 | Nicole Sperling
Jennifer Yuh Nelson, the director of the new animated film "Kung Fu Panda 2," might have been destined for a career in pictures. After immigrating to the United States from South Korea with her parents and two sisters when she was 4, Nelson spent her childhood in Lakewood watching martial arts movies, playing with cars and drawing. As a young girl, she would sit at the kitchen table for hours and watch her mother draw, copying her every stroke. Nelson traces the lineage of her career to those formative family experiences.
BUSINESS
December 28, 2010 | By John Horn, Los Angeles Times
2010 provided valuable lessons about what works -- and, more important, what doesn't work -- when it comes to the box-office performance of movies. Studios, in planning the kinds of films to make this year and next, might want to take note: Be careful what you pay for Reese Witherspoon ("How Do You Know"), Johnny Depp ("The Tourist"), Russell Crowe ("The Next Three Days") and Tom Cruise ("Knight and Day") may still command fat paychecks, but what's good for their agents isn't necessarily good for the box office: Each of the actors' last movies faltered.
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