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October 24, 1995 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the credits roll next month on Walt Disney Co.'s computer-animated feature "Toy Story," a familiar name will be listed as an executive producer: Steven P. Jobs. The celebrity computer entrepreneur--who co-founded Apple Computer in 1977 and left the company in a bitter falling out in 1985--recently asked for, and got, a credit on the film, sources at Disney say. His main contribution: He owns Pixar, the Richmond, Calif.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2001
The first Oscar statuette for the development of computer software was announced Friday, bestowed by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences on Rob Cook, Loren Carpenter and Ed Catmull of Pixar, creators of Renderman. The computer graphic software allows computer-generated scenes to be seamlessly matched with other footage in movies.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2001
The first Oscar statuette for the development of computer software was announced Friday, bestowed by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences on Rob Cook, Loren Carpenter and Ed Catmull of Pixar, creators of Renderman. The computer graphic software allows computer-generated scenes to be seamlessly matched with other footage in movies.
BUSINESS
May 5, 2000 | Bloomberg News
Pixar Inc., riding the success of the computer animated film "Toy Story 2," said its earnings soared in the first quarter to $26.4 million, or 53 cents a share, in the first quarter from $900,000, or 2 cents, a year ago, well above analyst expectations of 45 cents. Revenue climbed to $61 million from $3.4 million. Separately, Pixar said that former Walt Disney Studios Chairman Joe Roth joined its board. Pixar's earnings tend to rise and fall rapidly based on the release schedule of its films.
BUSINESS
May 5, 2000 | Bloomberg News
Pixar Inc., riding the success of the computer animated film "Toy Story 2," said its earnings soared in the first quarter to $26.4 million, or 53 cents a share, in the first quarter from $900,000, or 2 cents, a year ago, well above analyst expectations of 45 cents. Revenue climbed to $61 million from $3.4 million. Separately, Pixar said that former Walt Disney Studios Chairman Joe Roth joined its board. Pixar's earnings tend to rise and fall rapidly based on the release schedule of its films.
BUSINESS
February 16, 1998 | Associated Press
Officials at Pixar, the company that created the computer graphics for the movie "Toy Story," have filed suit over an anonymous e-mail message that revealed the salaries of the company's 400 employees. The e-mail distributed two weeks ago was attributed to Pixar Chief Executive Steve Jobs, who has denied sending it.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2011 | By Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
Crews of hundreds can typically spend years making a single animated feature — and it's not uncommon during what "Kung Fu Panda 2" director Jennifer Yuh Nelson describes as a "messy, creative process" for a director to be fired midway through a production. It happened to Jan Pinkava, who was directing 2007's "Ratatouille" before Brad Bird took over the Oscar-winning Pixar film. And it happened to Chris Sanders ("How to Train Your Dragon"), who was removed from Disney's "American Dog" in 2006, before it was reimagined as "Bolt.
BUSINESS
June 7, 2013 | By Alana Semuels
The economy is slowly adding jobs, as the most recent jobs report indicates, but they might not be the kind of jobs that will create strength in the economy. After all, employees and employers used to have a lifetime contract in which employees, guaranteed a job for life, would do the best they could for their organization. No longer. The relationship between workers and bosses has changed fundamentally, as a series of L.A. Times stories pointed out, and that's often worse for the worker.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 1994
Leading Japanese and American animation designers and state-of-the-art animation technology will take center stage at Anime Expo '94, a major animation industry convention to be held Friday through Sunday at the Anaheim Convention Center and Anaheim Marriott hotel.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2006 | Rachel Abramowitz, Times Staff Writer
Twenty-two years ago, computer animation was just a byte in Pixar guru John Lasseter's eye. Now, he's the director of "Cars," "Toy Story" and "Toy Story 2," not to mention the new animation chieftain of the Walt Disney Co. But back then, he was just a young animator who'd been canned from the Mouse House and had started working at George Lucas' Industrial Light and Magic, the special-effects powerhouse.
BUSINESS
October 24, 1995 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the credits roll next month on Walt Disney Co.'s computer-animated feature "Toy Story," a familiar name will be listed as an executive producer: Steven P. Jobs. The celebrity computer entrepreneur--who co-founded Apple Computer in 1977 and left the company in a bitter falling out in 1985--recently asked for, and got, a credit on the film, sources at Disney say. His main contribution: He owns Pixar, the Richmond, Calif.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2008 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
I VIVIDLY remember two things about having breakfast with Pixar guru John Lasseter earlier this year. One was that my back was out, so unable to sit comfortably, I had to take notes either standing up or lying down on the carpet of his hotel suite. The second was that when I asked him how Pixar had managed to rack up such an astounding streak of hit films, he said simply, "Quality is the best business plan of all."
BUSINESS
May 15, 1986 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS, Times Staff Writer
It was a night much like Oscar night--with showings of the winning films, nervous acceptance speeches that included naming the "little people" and, afterward, even some autograph seekers. The glitzy awards ceremony Tuesday, part of the National Computer Graphics Assn.'s annual conference and exhibition in Anaheim this week, was proof that at least a segment of the computer industry has gone Hollywood. That's only fitting, of course, because parts of Hollywood already have gone computer.
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