Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsPlacebo Effect
IN THE NEWS

Placebo Effect

HEALTH
February 11, 2008 | By Regina Nuzzo, Special to The Times
AS they seek to document and demystify one of life's great thrills, scientists have run across some real head-scratchers. How, for example, can they explain the fact that some men and women who are paralyzed and numb below the waist are able to have orgasms? How to explain the "orgasmic auras" that can descend at the onset of epileptic seizures -- sensations so pleasurable they prompt some patients to refuse antiseizure medication? And how on Earth to explain the case of the amputee who felt his orgasms centered in that missing foot?
Advertisement
NEWS
August 21, 1998 | From Associated Press
The Food and Drug Administration approved a radical and controversial treatment for crippling chest pain Thursday: a laser that zaps up to 40 tiny holes into the heart itself. The heart laser is only for the small proportion of heart patients who have a debilitating type of chest pain called stable angina that is not helped by conventional therapy, the FDA stressed.
HEALTH
August 29, 2005 | Emily Singer, Special to The Times
SHAM medicines can sometimes bring real pain relief. Now scientists say they know why. New research shows that the "placebo effect" has a real physiological basis: It triggers the brain's pain-fighting chemicals. The findings could boost the search for drug-free ways to treat pain. "Just the expectation of pain relief is enough to activate anti-pain mechanisms," says lead scientist Jon-Kar Zubieta, a neuroscientist at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2001 | From Bloomberg News
CardioGenesis Corp.'s stock suffered Tuesday's worst pummeling on Wall Street--losing 71% of its value--a day after the medical-device company revealed that a federal panel failed to back its latest laser treatment for heart patients. Shares of the Foothill Ranch company plummeted $2.04 to close at 85 cents on Nasdaq, the largest percentage loss on U.S. markets Tuesday. During trading, the price had fallen to 76 cents a share.
HEALTH
May 9, 2005 | Emily Singer, Special to The Times
Traditional acupuncture treatments for migraines are no better at reducing pain than sham acupuncture treatments, researchers have found, contradicting earlier research. But, in an unexpected twist, both methods appear to significantly reduce migraine frequency. "Sham acupuncture seems to be very potent compared to no treatment," said lead researcher Klaus Linde, a clinical epidemiologist at the Technische Universitat Munich in Germany.
HEALTH
July 20, 2009 | Emily Sohn
Allergies were far from Christie Littauer's mind when she fed creamed spinach to her son Jack for the first time. The 6-month-old had already eaten peas and green beans. Why not try something more exciting? "A few bites into it, he started wheezing," says Littauer, of Henderson, Nev. "He got bright red. Something was obviously wrong."
HEALTH
July 22, 2002 | JANE E. ALLEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a recent study found that a popular knee operation was only as good as a placebo for arthritis, some sufferers misconstrued the results, assuming that no surgery would help them. Doctors are now trying to reassure people this isn't the case.
HEALTH
August 17, 2009 | Shara Yurkiewicz
If you want to live longer -- avoid heart disease, Alzheimer's disease and cancer -- then pick and choose your foods with care to quiet down parts of your immune system. That's the principle promoted by the founders and followers of anti-inflammatory diets, designed to reduce chronic inflammation in the body. Dozens of books filled with diets and recipes have flooded the market in the last few years, including popular ones by dermatologist Dr. Nicholas Perricone and Zone Diet creator Barry Sears.
OPINION
December 24, 2007
Re "Generic drugs' hidden downside," Opinion, Dec. 17 Naomi Wax had a poor response from generic Zoloft and cites the example of another brand-name medication (Wellbutrin XL 300) that has had problems with its generic counterpart. In this case, the generic may release the active ingredient more quickly, which could result in more side effects and lower efficacy for some patients. But Wax was using a generic version of an immediate-release drug that would not have similar issues.
NEWS
April 14, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
Paging Stacy London and Clinton Kelly: Apparently dermatologists need some help in deciding what to wear when they see patients. The biggest controversy appears to involve whether skin specialists should wear their iconic white coats into the exam room or leave them in their offices. A survey reported this week in Archives of Dermatology found that 54% of adult patients want their dermatologist to wear the coats; however, only 26% of parents who brought their children to a pediatric dermatologist think the white coat is helpful in that setting.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|