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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2013 | By Rosanna Xia
Here's a summer reminder: Chipmunks and squirrels can carry infected fleas and plague, a bacterial disease people can contract through close contact with the furry animals, health officials warned. “Plague is naturally present in many parts of California, including higher elevation ... so we all need to be cautious around animals that can carry it,” El Dorado County Public Health Officer Dr. Alicia Paris-Pombo said in a statement Thursday. Because of the increased plague activity in the Tahoe Basin area last fall, El Dorado County health officials have been urging the public to take precaution this summer.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2014 | Robin Abcarian, This post has been corrected. See note at the bottom for details.
Is there something more to be said about the snafu at Pasadena City College that resulted in the snubbing of an Oscar-winning screenwriter who was invited to be the school's commencement speaker then crudely disinvited ? Absolutely. The school has tried to explain it all away as an unfortunate misunderstanding and has apologized, sort of, to Dustin Lance Black, class of '92. Black, who wrote "Milk," was told his services would not be needed at the school's May 9 graduation after administrators discovered he was involved in a five-year-old sex tape “scandal” that might give the school a “bad name.” They even seemed to realize that Black, an LGBT activist, was the victim in that case.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1999
Concerning Shakespeare on the Internet (Cybertainment, May 7), Erika Milvy reports on a "chart of coinciding historic events" thus: "It reveals . . . that the plague ravaged London during the years Shakespeare wrote his great tragedies and the 'Problem Plays.' " Shakespeare's life span was from 1564 to 1616. The Great Plague occurred decades later, in 1665. SARAH MONTOYA, Monterey Park
WORLD
April 14, 2014 | By Sherif Tarek
The United Nations human rights chief condemned widespread torture by all sides in the Syrian conflict, citing examples such as that of a detained 26-year-old woman who was raped, had her teeth pulled out and was beaten with electrical cables. The Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights said in a report released Monday that it had interviewed individuals who spent time in detention facilities in Syria. It did not identify them by name. It said the young woman reported that she had been tortured during repeated nightlong interrogation sessions.
NEWS
October 31, 2011 | By Dalina Castellanos, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Is migrating to the United States hazardous to your health? If you're Latino and have lived in the states more than 20 years, you might want to listen up: Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have found that the longer immigrants have lived in the U.S., the worse their health gets. Latinos who migrated to the U.S. more than 20 years ago were twice as likely to be obese as those who had lived here for less than 10 years, lead researcher Leslie Cofie and colleagues reported Monday at the American Public Health Association's annual meeting and expo in Washington.
NATIONAL
July 18, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
SEATTLE -- In the category of no good deed goes unpunished comes the tale of Paul Gaylord, the Prineville, Ore., man who tried to save a cat choking on a mouse and is now painfully recovering from a case of the plague. Oregon health officials have said there is no public health emergency - the disease that wiped out a third of Europe during the Middle Ages does not appear to have spread - but Gaylord just barely survived, and is likely to lose the better part of his fingers and toes to the disease.
NATIONAL
November 10, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A wildlife biologist at Grand Canyon National Park most likely died from plague contracted while performing a necropsy on a mountain lion that later tested positive for the disease. Eric York, 37, who worked in the park's cougar-collaring program, became ill on Oct. 30 and called in sick for a couple of days before being found dead in his home Nov. 2. Tests were positive for pneumonic plague. Officials said 49 people who came in contact with York were given antibiotics as a precaution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1989
A campground in the Angeles National Forest has been closed to allow health officials to control an outbreak of an animal disease that shows up as bubonic plague in humans, authorities said Wednesday. A ground squirrel found in the Table Mountain Campground about four miles west of Wrightwood has tested positive for sylvatic, or animal, plague, Los Angeles County health officials said. The disease is a bacterial infection affecting wild animals--especially ground squirrels--and can be transmitted to humans by means of a flea bite.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2010 | By Ruben Vives, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles County public health and U.S. Forest Service officials have closed the Los Alamos Campground in the Angeles National Forest after a California ground squirrel captured two weeks ago tested positive for plague. The camp, between Gorman and Pyramid Lake, was closed Saturday afternoon and will remain closed for at least 10 days, said Jonathan Fielding, the county's public health director. Squirrel burrows in the area will be dusted for fleas, and further testing will be conducted before the campground is reopened.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1985 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
"We hope never to consent to the deadly servitude of naturalism," wrote British playwright Peter Barnes 15 years ago in the preface to his best-known work, "The Ruling Class." His new piece at the Royal Shakespeare Company's Barbican Theatre, "Red Noses," suggests that he has kept the faith. The original title was "Red Noses, Black Death."
WORLD
April 7, 2014 | By Tom Kington, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
ROME -- Pope Francis has given his backing to the Vatican's scandal-ridden bank, Vatican officials said Monday, quashing months of speculation that he might close it down as part of wide-ranging reforms at the Holy See. In a statement, the Vatican said the bank “will continue to serve with prudence and provide specialized financial services to the [Roman] Catholic Church worldwide.” Set up in 1942 to offer accounts to priests, nuns, religious orders and Vatican employees, the bank has been embroiled in a series of scandals over alleged money-laundering and tax-dodging.
NATIONAL
March 21, 2014 | By Lalita Clozel
WASHINGTON - Two-fifths of the nation's public school districts offer no preschool programs, and most of those that do offer only part-day programs. Black students account for less than a fifth of those in preschool across the nation but make up almost half of the students who are suspended from preschool multiple times. Those results from the first comprehensive survey in nearly 15 years of civil rights data from the 97,000 U.S. public schools show they remain marked by inequities.
SPORTS
March 16, 2014 | By Dan Loumena
Carl Edwards won a rain-plagued NASCAR Sprint Cup Series race on Saturday, fittingly with the final two laps under caution as showers began to fall again. The Food City 500 was delayed nearly two hours before the start and for another three hours after 124 laps. The race restarted on Lap 167 with Kurt Busch taking the lead from Matt Kenseth for the lead. The race had already run 43 laps under caution. Edwards lead a sweep of Fords, with Roush Fenway Racing teammate Ricky Stenhouse Jr. taking second and Aric Almirola of Richard Petty Motorsports finishing third.
SPORTS
March 7, 2014 | By Chris Foster
SPOKANE, Wash. -- UCLA players might want to write this down. Game time is 8 p.m. on Saturday. The reason for the reminder is that the Bruins need a wakeup call most nights. They have trailed at halftime in seven of their last 10 games, including the last four. It has caused some second-half scrambles, such as Thursday's 91-82 victory over Washington. Players have identified first-half doldrums as a reason for problems on the road in conference play. UCLA has lost the second game of its three previous two-game trips in Pac-12 play.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2014 | By Angel Jennings
As part of a crackdown on nuisance businesses, city officials revoked the liquor license of a South Los Angeles liquor store Friday that they say had become a hot spot for crime and violence. Law enforcement officials said that 125 arrests had been made directly related to alcohol purchased at Time Square Liquor over the last two years, including for public intoxication and selling alcohol to minors. Additionally, the business had been cited twice for violating its conditional use permit by selling alcohol without a license.  "This is a long time coming," said LAPD Capt.
SPORTS
February 22, 2014 | By Ben Bolch
The New York Knicks were reportedly working on a buyout of Metta World Peace's contract Saturday. But there was nothing even the notorious Knicks public relations machine could do about the tweets of Daniel Artest , World Peace's brother. Among the highlights: "Ron wanted to be a knick his entire career and his dream became a nightmare. Knicks need an overhaul. Top to bottom. "Well. At least I got some nice knick gear. " "I'm not threatening [owner Jim ] Dolan on twitter tho. Lol. Some fan is locked up for that.
SPORTS
August 23, 2009 | Philip Hersh
The debacle continues for U.S. sprint relay teams. For the second straight major competition, neither the men nor the women could get from the preliminary round to the final for reasons that had nothing do to with their speed. Friday, the men botched a baton exchange for the sixth time in the 16 global championships - Olympics and worlds - since 1988. Today, before a rollicking sellout crowd at the 1936 Olympic Stadium, two injuries contributed to the women's failure, although an imperfect baton pass also may have been a factor.
NEWS
February 8, 2014 | By David Wharton
SOCHI, Russia - It was 2:30 a.m. and the stranger on the other side of the door wanted into my hotel room. "How many cards do you have?" he kept asking in broken English. The lock rattled and eventfully broke. Still hazy from sleep, I did all I could to keep him from forcing the door open. Finally, he backed away as more footsteps hurried down the hall. A new speaker identified himself as the hotel manager. He said the late-night intruder was a locksmith mistakenly sent to change the lock.
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