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ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2013 | By David Ng
Museums usually acquire tangible objects for their collections, but the Cooper - Hewitt, National Design Museum in New York has made the unconventional decision to acquire a sizable piece of intangible computer code. The museum said it has added the iPad application Planetary to its collection, marking the first time that the institution has acquired a piece of software as part of its curatorial mission. The Smithsonian described it in the September issues of its official magazine as an "unprecedented acquisition of an artifact you will never find encased in a plexiglass cube or sequestered in a climate-controlled storage facility.
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SCIENCE
October 10, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Diamonds are forever, unless you're on Saturn or Jupiter. Loads of the super-hard precious stones may be floating among the gas giants' fluid layers and melted into liquid further into their depths, say a pair of planetary scientists. The research, being presented at the Division for Planetary Sciences conference this week in Denver, sprang from very humble beginnings - soot in Saturn's atmosphere, said Kevin Baines, a planetary scientist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and one of the work's coauthors.
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NEWS
January 15, 1989
For "The Koppel Report: News From Earth" to have ignored the primary source of planetary despair--human overpopulation--is mind-boggling and irresponsible. SuSu Levy, Encino
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 2013 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Although most of his fellow space scientists scoffed at the idea, Jet Propulsion Laboratory scientist Bruce C. Murray insisted that a picture of a planet's surface was worth a thousand words - or at least as much as the measurements of magnetic fields and particle concentrations that his colleagues favored in the early days of planetary exploration in the 1960s. "Pictures," said Louis Friedman, a founder and former executive director of the Planetary Society, "were considered a stunt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1995 | From Times staff and wire reports
Peter M. Goldreich of Caltech is one of eight scientists to receive this year's National Medal of Science. Goldreich was praised for "his profound and lasting contributions to planetary sciences and astrophysics, providing fundamental theoretical insights for understanding the rotation of planets, the dynamics of planetary rings, pulsars, astrophysical masers, the spiral arms of galaxies and the oscillations of the sun." Other winners include Roger Shepard of Stanford University, Thomas Cech of the University of Colorado, Hans Dehmelt of the University of Washington, Hermann Haus and Alexander Rich of MIT, Isabella Karle of the Naval Research Laboratory and Louis Nirenberg of New York University.
SCIENCE
October 10, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Diamonds are forever, unless you're on Saturn or Jupiter. Loads of the super-hard precious stones may be floating among the gas giants' fluid layers and melted into liquid further into their depths, say a pair of planetary scientists. The research, being presented at the Division for Planetary Sciences conference this week in Denver, sprang from very humble beginnings - soot in Saturn's atmosphere, said Kevin Baines, a planetary scientist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and one of the work's coauthors.
NEWS
June 7, 1987
Thanks to Mary S. Rauch for her delightful tribute to Henry Ford's incomparable Model T ("The Model That Suited America's Auto Tastes to a T," Other Views, May 31). I have always regretted my failure to buy an excellent T roadster for $35 back in 1946, fearing that I would be unable to master its unorthodox "planetary" transmission. In addition to being the subject of endless levity, the tin lizzie spawned a plethora of lore and legend. When the planetary forward bands began to wear out, knowledgeable owners would brake with the reverse band until the entire transmission gave up the ghost and could be replaced as a unit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1997
Media reports of El Nino lack the one, most critical component--its cause, global warming. Treated as a weather story, we are deprived of the awareness that those who insist on selling us every last drop of oil on the planet are culpable in the various disasters global warming is expected to produce. Our president has responded by helping to move more manufacturing jobs to the Third World, where his proposals would allow greater production of greenhouse gases. Local leaders tell us to prepare, but nowhere do I hear politicians address the real problem; our planetary life-support system is being destroyed in the quest for profits.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1991
I have yet to hear an intellectually persuasive argument supporting the United States' militaristic, non-negotiating posture. Why couldn't we accept the fact that Saddam Hussein got Kuwait (in the same way that we "got" much of our land) and that he will not give it up for nothing? Some of our best friends are murderous megalomaniacs, and our adoption of a posture of moral superiority reflects a capacity for hypocrisy that sends chills down my spine. May no more die, and may our planetary nervous system, the mass media, carry the message of those who have come out with unprecedented numbers and speed and who feel the need to scream to make themselves heard over the quiet aggression of the "suits."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1990
Speaking of the 2,500 American "detainees," President Bush said, "Anything that compels individuals to do something against their will would, of course, concern me." I have to laugh and then cry. It never seems to bother Bush when he wants to compel several million women to be "detained" by a fetus. If we had a sane planetary population policy, we would not need to be in the Persian Gulf. What we are watching is the start of the real wars, not for politics or ideology, but for real things--food and energy, natural resources and living space.
SCIENCE
August 29, 2013 | By Thomas H. Maugh II and Karen Kaplan
Bruce C. Murray, a planetary astronomer who joined the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in 1960 and went on to lead the lab 16 years later, died early Thursday at his home in Oceanside. The cause of death was complications of Alzheimer's disease, according to his longtime friend Charlene Anderson. He was 81. Murray was a strong proponent of the scientific value of taking pictures of other planets, the better to learn about Earth. That was a minority view at the time he joined the lab, where missions to measure magnetic fields and particle concentrations were more in vogue.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2013 | By David Ng
Museums usually acquire tangible objects for their collections, but the Cooper - Hewitt, National Design Museum in New York has made the unconventional decision to acquire a sizable piece of intangible computer code. The museum said it has added the iPad application Planetary to its collection, marking the first time that the institution has acquired a piece of software as part of its curatorial mission. The Smithsonian described it in the September issues of its official magazine as an "unprecedented acquisition of an artifact you will never find encased in a plexiglass cube or sequestered in a climate-controlled storage facility.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 2013 | By Frederick N. Rasmussen
Robert S. Kraemer, NASA's former director of planetary exploration who was also an expert in rocket engines, died Aug. 20 at an assisted living home in Catonsville, Md., of complications from a fall, his family said. He was 84. Kraemer joined NASA in 1967 and, in one of his early assignments, managed the development of a Mars surface laboratory mission at NASA's headquarters in Washington. After the project was canceled because of congressional concerns, he was appointed manager of advanced planetary programs and technology and in 1970 was named director of planetary programs.
SCIENCE
July 19, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
So you've waved at Saturn and had your picture taken by Cassini from nearly 900 million miles away. Now what? At the time of the long-distance photo shoot, Earth and Cassini were about 898,500 million miles apart, which means it will take 1 hour, 20 minutes and 24 seconds for the photons that will go into the image to reach Cassini's wide-angle camera. "If we are to capture your photons, we would need you to be waving 80.4 minutes prior to your photons reaching the spacecraft cameras," Scott Edgington, deputy project scientist for the Cassini mission at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, explained in this blog post . “That's how we came up with the Earth-waving window,” which was between 2:27 and 2:42 p.m. Pacific time.
SCIENCE
April 19, 2013 | By Eryn Brown, This post has been updated. See below for details.
Don't cut planetary science funding, members of Congress urged NASA on Friday. In a letter to NASA Administrator Charles Bolden, Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Burbank) and Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), urged the space agency to maintain funding levels for missions to Mars and the outer planets that were allocated by Congress this spring -- and not to react to budget pressures by making disproportionate cuts to the science budget. "While we fully understand that the funding levels ... are subject to change to reflect across-the-board and sequester cuts, we expect that the balance among programs will remain consistent with the structure directed by Congress," they wrote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 2012 | By Scott Gold, Los Angeles Times
WATERTON CANYON, Colo. - The concrete-floored room looks, at first glance, like little more than a garage. There is a red tool chest, its drawers labeled: "Hacksaws. " "Allen wrenches. " There are stepladders and vise grips. There is also, at one end of the room, a half-built spaceship, and everyone is wearing toe-to-fingertip protective suits. "Don't. Touch. Anything. " Bruce Jakosky says the words politely but tautly, like a protective father - which, effectively, he is. Jakosky is the principal investigator behind NASA's next mission to Mars, putting him in the vanguard of an arcane niche of science: planetary protection - the science of exploring space without messing it up. PHOTOS: Stunning images of Earth at night As NASA pursues the search for life in the solar system, the cleanliness of robotic explorers is crucial to avoid contaminating other worlds.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1989 | SUVAN GEER
The scientific discovery that the universe is continuing to "bang" outward gives artists the fits just like every other mortal who senses his own demise as more than just an abstraction. "Unstable Universe," a current group show, addresses that abstraction and gives it a vivid pictorial grounding. The exhibit uses paintings by several artists to create a kind of cosmic womb-to-tomb experience. To walk around the gallery is to snatch a series of ideas that leap time and space in carefully choreographed rapid bounds.
NEWS
November 14, 2009 | TIM RUTTEN
When Neil Armstrong stepped on the lunar surface and announced, "We came in peace for all mankind," it marked a fundamental break with the long history of human exploration. From the great Age of Discovery forward, men had claimed territories previously unknown for their guilds, companies and nations. The race to the moon was born of the brutal competition between the United States and the Soviet Union for preeminence in every field of endeavor, but the moment of victory transformed America's vision of its heroic triumph.
SCIENCE
December 6, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel
What should the future of our space program be? The National Research Council had unpleasant medicine for NASA in its just-released report on the vision and direction of the agency. A panel of 12 independent experts concluded, among other things, that the program lacks clear direction from the White House and Congress about what its goals should be, and that NASA cannot do everything it aims to without more money. More cash is an unlikely prospect in the current economic climate, the panel also said.
SCIENCE
September 9, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
A new theory is pouring some cold - actually, some really hot - water on the idea that Mars could have been habitable in the past. Planetary scientists searching the Red Planet for places that could have contained the building blocks for life look for clues in clays, which can offer some indication that water must have flowed on or just under Mars' surface. But a new study suggests that, at least in some cases, those clays might be a red herring. A paper published online Sunday by the journal Nature Geoscience argues that such clays might have been formed in hot Martian magma rich in water.
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