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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2013 | By Richard Winton and Ari Bloomekatz
Body parts found at two treatment plants 30 miles away from each other appear to be related, the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department said. The upper torso of a woman was found at a waste treatment plant near Whittier on Monday and is believed to match a pelvis and legs found Saturday at a water treatment plant in Carson, officials said. Detectives are treating the matter as a homicide, said Lt. Mike Rosson of the Sheriff's Department. Coroner's officials said they will examine the DNA of the body parts to be sure they are linked.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2013 | By Robert J. Lopez
Law enforcement authorities in Chino seized more than 100 marijuana plants and high-powered firearms as part of an ongoing investigation, police said Wednesday. Police said the probe was launched after they received a tip of a possible marijuana growing operation at a home in the 6200 block of Susana Street. Part of the home and a separate building in the backyard were allegedly used for the grow operation, according to the Chino Police Department. Of the 11 firearms that were seized, two were assault weapons and two others had been reported stolen, police said.
NATIONAL
September 19, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee and Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration will propose rules Friday to sharply curtail permissible emissions of carbon dioxide from new power plants, an important step toward fulfilling the president's recently reinvigorated commitment to address climate change. New coal-fired plants would have to limit emissions of heat-trapping carbon dioxide to 1,100 pounds per megawatt hour, down from the current range of 1,800 to 2,100 pounds using conventional technology, according to an administration official who spoke on condition of anonymity before the official release of the plan.
BUSINESS
October 9, 2013 | By David Pierson
A U.S. Department of Agriculture letter to Foster Farms highlights a series of food safety violations that may have led to the recent outbreak of salmonella that has sickened nearly 300 people across the nation. Foster Farms was cited 12 times between Jan. 1 and Sept. 27 for fecal material on poultry carcasses and was found to have "poor sanitary dressing practices, insanitary food contact surfaces and direct product contamination. " The letter, known as a Notice of Intended Enforcement, was sent Monday and threatens to close three Foster Farm facilities deemed to be the origin of the outbreak.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 2013 | By Robert J. Lopez
Deputies seized more than 600 marijuana plants valued at about $1 million from a sophisticated "grow" operation at a Palmdale home, authorities said Monday night. Every room in the home in the 200 block of East Avenue P-2 had been turned into a hydroponic pot garden, the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department said. Deputies discovered the plants Monday afternoon after they saw a car at the home registered to a man with a felony warrant for narcotics possession, according to the department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2013 | By Robert J. Lopez
A reputed Palmdale gang member was arrested after deputies reported finding 125 marijuana plants growing at his home, authorities said Wednesday night. Detectives said the "grow operation" was capable of yielding 50 pounds of pot a year with an estimated value of $45,000, according to the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department. The plants were discovered by deputies who served a search warrant at the home in the 6100 block of Plaza Court as part an investigation into suspected marijuana growing, department officials said in a statement.
SCIENCE
October 24, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times
To the naked eye, the white puffs of cotton growing on shrubs, the yellow flowers on canola plants and the towering tassels on cornstalks look just like those on any other plants. But inside their cells, where their DNA contains instructions for how these crops should grow, there are a few genes that were put there not by Mother Nature but by scientists in a lab. Some of the genes are from a soil bacterium called Bacillus thuringiensis that makes proteins lethal to flies, moths and other insects.
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