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HOME & GARDEN
April 17, 2003 | David Colker, Times Staff Writer
The epic "Lord of the Rings" battle looked dazzling. The incredibly thin plasma screen seemed as much a window onto another world as a television. Hordes of mythic fighters swept across the screen as a surround-sound system put me in the middle of it all, with thundering hoofbeats, battle cries and a booming heraldic score. Even the smoke wafting across the screen looked real. Actually, it was real.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2002 | Mark Swed
"Sun Rings" collaborators Terry Riley, David Harrington and Willie Williams all describe Donald Gurnett as an amiable tour guide to the solar system. In fact, a visit to Gurnett's office can be exhilarating and start your head spinning from the implications that plasma physics and space sounds can have on life on Earth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 2002 | MEGAN GARVEY and MITCHELL LANDSBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The deaths of six liver transplant patients at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, all associated with transfusions of a highly touted new form of blood plasma, have led to a warning against use of the product in such surgeries or when patients have severe liver disease. Six of 31 or 32 liver transplant patients at Cedars-Sinai died after receiving the new form of plasma between April and December 1999.
SCIENCE
March 25, 2002 | J. MATTHEW ALDAG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Inside Walter Gekelman's warehouse-sized laboratory in Westwood Village, enough electricity to power a thousand homes pours into a row of 68 magnet rings, each one weighing half a ton. A steady pulse of brilliant red light flashes from inside the cylindrical machine--as tall as a bus and twice as long. With each pulse, a thimble's worth of neon gas seeps into the near-vacuum inside the machine and directly into the path of a 500,000-watt electron beam.
NEWS
August 16, 2001 | DAVID COLKER, david.colker@latimes.com
Plasma monitor televisions, which feature spectacular picture quality and are so thin you can hang them on a wall like a piece of art, are appropriately named. They will bleed your wallet. The prices for plasma display panel, or PDP, TVs range from about $7,500 for a 42-inch model to about $15,000 for a 50-inch model equipped for high-definition digital television. PDP TVs are offered by Sony, Hitachi, NEC, Panasonic, Sharp and others. The non-plasma alternatives are much cheaper.
NEWS
May 31, 2001 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They came here looking for treatment, they said, some way to get better, feel stronger. But they also came to talk about the scourge that has turned their lives into burdens, children into orphans and their village into what one doctor calls a "combat zone." The scourge is AIDS. And it is laying waste to small pockets of China's most populous province, Henan, among poor farmers who knew little or nothing about the disease when they were first infected through tainted blood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
Thomas H. Stix, a leader in the development of the field of plasma physics, has died. He was 76. Stix, professor emeritus of astrophysical sciences at Princeton University, died Monday in Princeton, N.J., of complications from leukemia. Stix's work advanced research in plasma physics by showing how waves could heat plasma, also known as ionized or electrified gas.
BUSINESS
December 2, 1999 | ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The next time a hospital official needs a few pints of AB-negative blood quickly or a doctor runs out of rubber gloves, he or she can bid for them on the medical supply version of EBay. Bergen Brunswig Corp. in Orange, the nation's largest distributor of pharmaceuticals and medical supplies, on Wednesday launched Pharmabid.com, the first auction Web site to sell such perishable items as blood and plasma.
NEWS
May 7, 1998 | From Associated Press
The Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday approved a new technology that allows scientists to wash certain viruses, including the AIDS virus, out of plasma. The FDA's approval comes amid a Justice Department antitrust investigation of the American Red Cross' exclusive contract for this "scrubbed blood," but the first batches of new plasma will be ready to ship to interested hospitals in two weeks, authorities said. The nation's blood supply already is very safe because of intense testing.
NEWS
July 6, 1997 | Associated Press
Scientists who helped engineer the first cloned sheep are close to generating human blood plasma from animals, a newspaper reported today. PPL Therapeutics, the Scottish firm that helped Edinburgh's Roslin Institute clone a sheep, is developing the means to replace the plasma genes of sheep and cows with the human equivalent, according to the Observer, a respected weekly newspaper.
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